first time engineered click lock installation

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-15-14, 08:53 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 8
first time engineered click lock installation

Hi,
This is my first time doing major DIY home improvement project.
I was initially going for porcelain tile for the entire house because i will have a baby soon and worried about spilling water and scratching but some of you in tile forum advised against it so i am going with wood.

I have questions:
1. Is it ok to install engineered wood continuous covering large area? In other words, one large floating floor. My biggest concern is shrinking/expansion and i am curious if it would worsen in large area.

2. My house has some portion of the 1st floor with hardwood and other areas covered in carpet. Assuming I can find pattern that matches existing floor, how would i do flat transition from my new wood floor to the existing?

3. My first floor living room has step down (about 5 inches) that split the area into 2. Do I just install stair nose at the edge?

4. During acclamation, do I open the box? I heard that for engineered click lock, it is better to not open until installation to help it expand a little and make lock tighter but i want to confirm.

5. I live in Seattle where it rains a lot. Which one is better? HDF or poplar?

6. I will have a baby in a couple of month and I want to protect the floor from water/milk spills. I know that nothing can save the floor if i let the liquid sit for many hours but is there some seals that i can apply between wood tiles to reduce damage?

7. What is the best underlayment? I don't worry about noise on the first floor but i will need some noise reduction on 2nd floor.

8. I will be moving to this new house in a couple of weeks. We will hire 'we pack & move' movers. Any special instructions I need to give them to make sure they don't scratch my new floor?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-16-14, 02:18 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
1) It depends on the thickness of the flooring and the manufacturer's recommendations. Some recommend breaking at all doorways.
2) Flat transitions can only be made if the new flooring is the same thickness as the old. Give us some measurements. Wouldn't hurt to let us know the type flooring you are planning, too.
3) Yes, a matching stair nosing would make it look finished.
4) Again, check the manufacturer's recommendation.
5) Engineered flooring is wood and contains no HDF. Style and brand may help us.
6) Apply no sealant to engineered flooring. It floats. Not literally, but it isn't attached.
7) You must adhere to the manufacturer's recommendation on underlayment to maintain the flooring's warranty. If none are specified, I like the Roberts red with white dots.
8) Pick it up.....put it down. No sliding without carpeted cups under the feet. I would recommend you buy a gazillion of them ahead of time.

While I would not recommend any wood product in a wet area (kitchen/bath), it seems to be the posh thing to do. I would tile the kitchen and install wood in other areas. Let us know the brand and style of flooring you plan on using and you can post some pictures if you like of your work area. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
  #3  
Old 06-16-14, 04:29 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 8
  #4  
Old 06-16-14, 05:43 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
What you have chosen is not engineered flooring, but 3/8" laminate in click lock. It still has a body of HDF, which could degrade over time and exposure to moisture or water. It does have a 55 year wear warranty, so that is a plus. Just be careful in the locations where you want to lay it. Just for grins, check into the pricing of a comparable color click lock engineered flooring. If you could handle it, you would be so much better satisfied.
 
  #5  
Old 06-16-14, 05:56 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 8
Thanks Chandler,
HomeDepot has it under engineered click lock so i thought it is not laminate.
I am confused.
Are you consider HDF as laminate?
Is poplar better? for example this one: Millstead Hickory Natural 3/8 in. Thick x 4-1/4 in. Wide x Random Length Engineered Click Hardwood Flooring (20 sq. ft. / case)-PF9394 at The Home Depot
it says "Core Material: Poplar"
 
  #6  
Old 06-16-14, 06:20 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
The engineered flooring will have cross sectional layers of wood, similar to plywood. That is what gives plywood its strength. Similarly these layers will give strength and resistance to warping to the engineered flooring. The core is real wood (poplar) with layers above and below and a final layer of hickory on top with aluminum oxide finish. I do like your choice and, as you can see, the pricing is not that much different. Both HDF and MDF are laminates in the manufacturing process. No cross sectional strength.

You are doing your studying. Now you make your choice. Hope some information will enlighten your choice. Next, go to the store and hold the two in your hands and look at the composition of the two flooring. I think you will see a difference.
 
  #7  
Old 06-17-14, 01:20 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 8
thanks, i am learning a lot from this post.
In your opinion, is solid hardwood better than engineered in durability and fair well against moisture?
I live in Seattle where it rains and i am concerend about it shrinking/expanding too much.
I also noticed that there isn't that many click-lock for solid.
Most of them are nail down. Do you know why?

What brand is trust worthy. I've been doing research and Bruce seems to have been around for long. If there are others you can recommend that would be great.

And are floors usually made in China thesedays? I am concerned about what kind of chemical treatment they have gone through.

thanks!
 
  #8  
Old 06-17-14, 02:55 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
IMO, staple/cleat hardwood is far superior to any other wood type floor, but that's just an opinion. Full 3/4" hardwood won't come in click lock as it can't float.It must be secures to the subflooring. Way too much movement if not secured. If secured, however, it will be "rock". Acclimating hardwood flooring to the environment it will reside in is of utmost importance, and will reduce the possibility of shrinking and expanding. All flooring must be acclimated at least 72 hours prior to installation.

Bruce is good flooring. While we can't recommend a specific brand on the forums, most of the bigger name brands will be excellent choices. For a variety beyond the box store selections, you may want to visit local dealerships, or places like Lumber Liquidators.

Not sure of the Chinese connection, but I'm too old to be surprised by anything. If they are made in China, we ship them the wood and they make it into flooring. Sort of counter productive, IMO, but it's done.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'