What to do first. Hardwood flooring.

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-20-14, 05:45 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
What to do first. Hardwood flooring.

So my wife and I have recently relocated back to Colorado Springs where we moved back into our old home. Let me start by saying I will never rent my property out again. Anyway long story short the property management company didn't take care of our property. We have started work in the living room completely scraped all the paint off the walls took out the carpet and pad and we discovered hard wood flooring. Some one had halfway painted it white or tried to with primer I think. I have know idea why they did that. I guess my question is should we stop with the walls and do the floor or continue with the walls and do the floor last?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-20-14, 05:53 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,759
Received 74 Votes on 70 Posts
Welcome to the forums Fred!

I'm not sure I totally understand what you are asking but generally you finish the walls prior to finishing the floors. The walls/trim might need some touch up after the floors are done but doing the floors last usually means less work. It's possible the primer on the floor was applied to seal in urine odors
Why are you having to scrape the paint off of interior walls
 
  #3  
Old 08-20-14, 05:59 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The house was built in the 60s and it just looked like the management company would slap a new coat of paint on and it was very textured. My wife wanted a smooth clean looking wall. Most of the paint came off with no issues. You answered my question I just didn't know which to finish first wall or floor. Thanks for the info. If I start sanding this floor will that let the urine odor out? How hard is it to refinish a floor.
 
  #4  
Old 08-20-14, 06:07 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,759
Received 74 Votes on 70 Posts
Just to be clear, we don't know that there is a urine issue - just that it's a possibility. I don't know if sanding will be an issue or if that was the reason for the primer. Sanding is the most difficult part of refinishing a floor.

Normally paint doesn't scrape well off of drywall/plaster. It sounds like somewhere along the line there was an adhesion issue. Latex primers/paints don't adhere well to oil base enamels. The age of the house suggests that oil base enamel was used in the kitchen and baths but normally the rest of the house would have had either latex or flat oil. I've never known of any adhesion issues from applying latex over flat oil wall paint. Whenever painting latex over oil it's best to first apply a coat of a solvent based primer [oil or shellac] The primer will adhere to the enamel and the latex to the primer. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/pa...latex-oil.html
 
  #5  
Old 08-20-14, 06:21 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Well hopefully it's not urine. Thanks for the info on the paint. The stuff pretty much peeled right off there was a few repairs that we uncovered those areas gave us the most difficulty. Pretty much have the entire room down to drywall. Applied a thin layer of drywall compound to the entire area to make it smoother we will sand today.
 
  #6  
Old 08-20-14, 07:07 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,270
Received 41 Votes on 38 Posts
Just to reinforce Mark's suggestion, I would prime everything with an oil based primer after you're done with the mud and sanding in order to create the best possible surface for your paint.

As to the floor, the only way to find out what you have is start sanding and see what happens. Worst case, you'll know why the floor was primed/painted and be doing it again.
 
  #7  
Old 08-20-14, 08:36 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,759
Received 74 Votes on 70 Posts
IMO an oil base primer isn't needed over the skim coat although it might have been beneficial under it. Most any latex wall primer should do well over the j/c.
 
  #8  
Old 08-20-14, 08:39 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,270
Received 41 Votes on 38 Posts
I went with oil based with the idea it could be going over oil based paint in spots as well - I was assuming there were going to be places where we weren't certain what was there and paranoia is covered with the oil based primer. Agreed, for just mud, latex primer is fine.
 
  #9  
Old 08-20-14, 08:51 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks guys for the great info. The wife and I now look like we got carried away eating powdered doughnuts.
 
  #10  
Old 08-20-14, 08:52 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,759
Received 74 Votes on 70 Posts
..... and I was assuming a solid skim coat - maybe Fred will let us know for sure
 
  #11  
Old 08-20-14, 12:48 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Okay now you got me Marksr. Thought all I needed to do was smooth with drywall compound then go right on with the primer then the paint
 
  #12  
Old 08-20-14, 12:53 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,759
Received 74 Votes on 70 Posts
It is, providing the j/c will adhere well to the substrate.
 
  #13  
Old 08-21-14, 08:36 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Name:  image.jpg
Views: 270
Size:  31.7 KBName:  image.jpg
Views: 231
Size:  15.3 KBName:  image.jpg
Views: 242
Size:  18.7 KB

Thought y'all might like to see some of the progress. Walls will get a final sanding this morning and hopefully primer and paint this afternoon. The picture of the floor is to show the paint they put on it.
 
  #14  
Old 08-21-14, 08:41 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,270
Received 41 Votes on 38 Posts
It's like someone started to paint the floor and then changed their mind. Hopefully you don't find something ugly under there....
 
  #15  
Old 08-21-14, 10:26 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,759
Received 74 Votes on 70 Posts
There is no telling what goes thru some folk's minds

Expect to get a good bit of dust on your newly painted walls when you sand the floor but it will dust off easily.
 
  #16  
Old 08-21-14, 12:42 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Okay thought we were through with mud but had a few spots that we weren't happy with. My wife says I can be a bit of a perfectionist. And then she decided she wanted to do the other wall because it also had texture on it so we are once again waiting for jc to dry. Everything else is sanded and waiting for paint.
 
Attached Images  
  #17  
Old 08-21-14, 01:43 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,759
Received 74 Votes on 70 Posts
Better catch them now than after the finish paint is applied! You might even find some more when you prime [still not a biggie] Shining a bright light on the wall while viewing it at an angle can be helpful for spotting the bad spots.
 
  #18  
Old 08-21-14, 02:11 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Can't wait to get paint on the wall. You Guys have been a great source and all the help is appreciated.
 
  #19  
Old 08-21-14, 04:19 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,270
Received 41 Votes on 38 Posts
Just keep in mind paint generally makes imperfections in the wall more noticeable, not less, so you want to address everything you can see now.
 
  #20  
Old 08-21-14, 05:09 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I know take my time and do it right. I'm on a time line here fellas lol they deliver my household goods next week. Need to stay busy the next few days so I can get this done. How long does it generally take to re-Finnish a floor?
 
  #21  
Old 08-22-14, 03:59 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,759
Received 74 Votes on 70 Posts
Sanding the floor takes the most time, hard to judge how long not knowing the sander and person operating it. While staining/finishing doesn't take a lot of time to apply, there is a fair amount of drying time involved. Generally it takes 3 coats of poly [sanding between coats] Oil base gives the toughest finish although water based poly will dry quicker. Temperature and humidity can affect drying time but generally a 3 coat oil job will take 3 days and waterbased 2 days.
 
  #22  
Old 08-22-14, 07:50 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Morning guys just wanted to address a few issues I have seen in the floor so far. There are a few areas in the floor where a squeak exist. I think it adds charm to the house. Wife thinks it's annoying. How do I address squeaks? Also there are a few areas with holes and damaged areas. I'll add pictures so you can see what I'm talking about. I would like to move this coax cable that the cable company apparently put in when I had a tenant living here.
 
Attached Images    
  #23  
Old 08-22-14, 07:55 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,270
Received 41 Votes on 38 Posts
I address squeaks by driving screws through the flooring into the structure below. Not sure how well that works for the appearance of the floor, though.

I'm not sure about the holes - I think you're going to have to fill them with wood of some kind to have anything resembling a nice looking floor afterward.
 
  #24  
Old 08-22-14, 08:17 AM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 8,323
Received 14 Votes on 14 Posts
Lowes has a squeak kit for hard wood floors. Same kit works for carpeted floors. Had a bad squeak in one bedroom and Hour later no more squeaks. Instrustions did not look hard for wood.
 
  #25  
Old 08-22-14, 08:21 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,759
Received 74 Votes on 70 Posts
For a hole of that size, I'd get the right size dowel [redrill if necessary] and glue it in place.
I don't know it's correct name but they sell a paste that is used for filling in cracks and defects in hardwood. You apply it prior to the final sanding, let it dry and then sand. Sanding will remove all of the filler except what stays in the cracks and nail holes.
 
  #26  
Old 08-22-14, 10:37 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks guys. I'm on my way for trip 5 to the Home Depot. Gotta price a sander and make sure it's not a belt sander. Got the first coat of paint on finally here is a picture to show progress.
 
Attached Images  
  #27  
Old 08-22-14, 10:54 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,270
Received 41 Votes on 38 Posts
Looking good so far
 
  #28  
Old 08-24-14, 01:25 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I would really like to meet the guy that put primer all over this what's turning out to be a beautiful hardwood floor. So I can charge him for all the sanding pads I have gone through. But it's really starting to look good.
 
Attached Images  
  #29  
Old 08-24-14, 01:36 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,759
Received 74 Votes on 70 Posts
What some folks were thinking defies understanding
The good thing is, the bigger improvements are that you make, the bigger your bragging rites are when you get done It won't look like the same room when you get done
 
  #30  
Old 08-24-14, 04:19 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
It's really slow going but every inch of hardwood I expose is looking great.
 
Attached Images  
  #31  
Old 08-27-14, 06:49 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Got the stain on and two coats of poly. Should I go another coat?
 
Attached Images  
  #32  
Old 08-27-14, 06:59 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,270
Received 41 Votes on 38 Posts
I like three coats myself so I would say so.

Looking very nice, by the way
 
  #33  
Old 08-27-14, 07:23 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,759
Received 74 Votes on 70 Posts
3 coats is the norm but if the sheen is constant and there are no rough areas, 2 may be ok.

where did the nasty room you started with go
 
  #34  
Old 08-27-14, 08:45 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 15
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Three it is fellas. I know where did that nasty room go? Just hope I can finish out the trim and that it looks nice. I'm not much of a precision wood worker lol. Usually have a beer in my hand which can make things cricked. Lol. I'm about to put the final coat on then we have to take a small break from renovation. The movers are delivering my household goods tomorrow. Thanks for all the help.
 
  #35  
Old 08-27-14, 09:24 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,759
Received 74 Votes on 70 Posts
I'm not a great carpenter but my painting experience has made me a pro with a caulk gun .... and IF the woodwork is close - you can make it look perfect by the time it's caulked, puttied and painted

There is an old saying - give me enough caulk and putty and I can make anyone a carpenter
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes