Kitchen Renovation - Floor Timing


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Old 09-01-14, 10:25 PM
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Kitchen Renovation - Floor Timing

We are renovating our kitchen and will be installing a floating laminate floor (Probably Pergo Max) over a concrete slab foundation.
  1. Should we install the new cabinets first and then install the floor?
  2. Should I install plywood under the cabinets to raise their base surface up to the expected final finished height of our floor?
  3. Should I just handle the required floor edge gap with transition molding or should I consider cutting the front edge of the cabinet under-layment about 1/2" too short so that the floor can just float under the front edge of the cabinets?
Thank you in advance for your help.

Dave
 
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Old 09-01-14, 10:52 PM
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IMO... Yes, yes, and yes. And you should probably also plan on adding base shoe around the cabinets after the toe kick is on.
 
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Old 09-01-14, 10:56 PM
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Should we install the new cabinets first and then install the floor?
Yes. The floor does not go under cabinets. Floor needs to float.

Should I install plywood under the cabinets to raise their base surface up to the expected final finished height of our floor?
Rather than match height of floor, it is more important height of cabinets accommodate appliance height. Check Range and Dishwasher. Compare this to finished height of cabinets including counter top. Talk to your counter provider and check if there will be any underlayment for counter, such as 5/8" plywood.


Should I just handle the required floor edge gap with transition molding or should I consider cutting the front edge of the cabinet under-layment about 1/2" too short so that the floor can just float under the front edge of the cabinets?
No floor under cabinets. You can place flooring under dishwasher or just have it go into the space 3 or 4" so front legs can sit on floor.
In front of cabinets, you should have a separate toe kick that's applied after cabinets are set. Once set, lay down floor. Cut accurately around cabinets so you can cover gap with 3/4 round molding. If you don't have the 3/4 round I would suggest ordering some. 3/4 round finishes off the cabinets and adds a touch of class.

See instructions for floor. In wet areas, all gaps should be filled with high quality silicone. Floor will still float with silicone at edges.
 
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Old 09-02-14, 07:59 PM
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Thank you both the answers and the great tips.

Dave
 
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Old 09-03-14, 05:03 AM
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Both Xsleeper and Handyone are correct.

Just to re-enforce what Handyone said, do put flooring under appliance. It makes so much easier to install, uninstall and repair when necessary.
 
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Old 09-03-14, 10:55 AM
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I'm surprised Chandler hasn't chimed in yet but, while this is not what you asked, I would not put laminate in a kitchen as it does not withstand water well at all.
 
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Old 09-03-14, 02:00 PM
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I'm surprised Chandler hasn't chimed in yet but, while this is not what you asked, I would not put laminate in a kitchen as it does not withstand water well at all.
So long as you don't let water get into the seams. I've had laminate on our kitchen floor now for about 10 years. Even with the dog water dish splash, I've not had problems. But the trick is to wipe it up quickly and don't let it soak into the seams.

But it's true, the smart money is to avoid it if possible.
 
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Old 09-03-14, 02:12 PM
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I put laminate in my kitchen. It's high quality DuPont.
The seams lock so well, normal water will not penetrate. The silicone filled edges are critical, if water gets under the boards, it's time for a new floor.
Laminate's not for everyone, I have the luxury of being able to replace it at a reasonable cost if I ever have a flood.
I didn't mention it before, but I would stay away from Pergo. I have only seen bad looking floors.
I believe they started this laminate trend, but others have far surpassed them in quality.
 
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Old 09-03-14, 06:15 PM
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Put laminate in a kitchen at your own risk. Most leaks will be hidden from view and will get the floor from below. If this is your intended route, but 2 extra cases of flooring and stash away for that rainy day that will come. The style will be discontinued by then and you will be SOL.

I also would not recommend sealing gaps with silicone. Not sure what that means, but if around the edges of the install, it is a no no. A floating floor need room to move. Any obstruction, even if flexible, will cause issues with the flooring.

Maintain your expansion gaps, cover exposed with transition strips or Base + shoe molding. Make sure that your underlayment is a combination sound deadener and vapor barrier.
 
 

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