Hardwood Plywood Flooring?

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  #1  
Old 10-08-14, 05:32 PM
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Hardwood Plywood Flooring?

We're building a 14 X 24 cabin on the remote desert in SW Arizona for recreational use. Our budget is limited and my wife and I will be doing most of the work. I'm going nuts negotiating with myself as to the floor treatment. This is all new to us (building a cabin) and I'm getting most of my information from the internet and a couple of books.

The floor joists will be 2X10's on 16" centers with a 13' span. I want to avoid a subfloor. I was looking at 1X6 T&G pine for the floor but have just about given up on that after seeing the actual thickness (3/4"?) and wondering about just how much that floor would flex when we walk across it. I'm also concerned about my skill and the hours required to do a nice job of laying the T&G.

What I'm considering now is4X8 3/4" hardwood plywood attached with screws. We were looking at birch and oak at HD this morning and thought one of these might be a decent cabin floor, after applying a good finish. The top layer, the hardwood veneer, looked like 1/8" thick. Would this stuff survive as a floor, or is it only for furniture. I'm also looking for recommendations on surface treatment.


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Old 10-08-14, 06:33 PM
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Sounds like your first build.
Plywood's not made to be a finished floor, really want to be looking at seams and screw heads?
What's up with not wanting a subfloor?
After installing Advantech T & G with construction adhesive on the joist attached with 8D ring shanked nails you could have a strong enough floor to install just about any real flooring over it that would holdup for many years.
Considered using engineered or prefinished real wood flooring?
 
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Old 10-08-14, 06:37 PM
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I want to avoid a subfloor.
At your own risk, installing flooring without proper subfloor is something that most of the pro's on this site will frown upon. Every floor, regardless of what you end up putting in, needs a good base to sit upon. Starting out the gate with a negative attitude about the sub structure will leave you disappointed down the road. You do it right the first time or you will be doing it again in the future.

I understand tight budgets, I get it. But you managed to buy a cabin in the desert, so we are not paupers. I think you need to rethink priorities. The cabin and all that are attached convey with the building. You get one shot to make it right when building it. It is cheaper to do it right now than redo later. Search all the posts here who have particleboard floors who have needed to change things. Skimp where you want. I would not skimp under the flooring as it needs to last a long time.
 
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Old 10-08-14, 09:18 PM
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Thanks for the feedback.

Yes, this is my first build. I appreciate your comments and am prepared to go with a subfloor. Earlier on I was looking at GP Plytanium Sturdi-Floor as an option. Would 3/4" Sturdi-Floor be a sound choice here? The advantage I have been able to find for AdvanceTech is it's resistance to moisture (rain and snow). Given my location SW Arizona (hot and dry) and the short time the subfloor will be uncovered ((I could use a tarp for cover if necessary), is there any negative to the Sturdi-Floor option?

As a point of reference, we'll be using this cabin 1-2 months each year. It's a "dry cabin" - no water, electricity, or sewer. Any other suggestions are welcome!
 
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Old 10-08-14, 09:31 PM
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I would think if you put the best sub-floor you could afford down now, you could use that as the actual floor for a while til you have the money or get a good deal on what you'd really like? I mean, it's a cabin right? So it looks a little unfinished for a while, what's the harm?
 
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Old 10-09-14, 04:33 AM
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I agree installing a sub floor and leaving it bare [or maybe painting it] until you can afford the flooring you desire is a good plan. That said, we rented a cabin in the smokeys a few yrs back that had 2 bed rms 0n the 2nd floor. What they did was used T&G pine on the floor which doubled as the exposed ceiling on the 1st floor. IMO the biggest drawbacks are pine doesn't wear as well as hardwood and between a few missing knots and lack of insulation there was a lot of sound transfer between the 2 floors.
 
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Old 10-09-14, 05:17 AM
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You should be fine with the Sturdi-Floor. However, if you ever intend to install tile or plank "wood" look tile or large format tile, up one step to the Advantech (Home Advantage in big orange). Few bucks more, but worth the investment.

And, it is more than just weather resistant, it is a superior material altogether - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cqL4K6m4kKI
 
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