Building 10' x 6' bookshelf, better to put on laminate or on underlay?


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Old 10-22-14, 04:12 PM
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Building 10' x 6' bookshelf, better to put on laminate or on underlay?

Okay, So I'm in the process of remodeling a EDIT: [my] bedroom and right now have a bare concrete floor.

I will be building a 10' wall-to wall bookshelf along the entire north wall, and will be running the laminate north-to south.

I have read that one should avoid placing very heavy objects on wood laminate flooring as it needs to "float", So should I place the bookshelf on the underlay and then use a shoeing strip (or similar) across the front of the bookshelf, or would it be better to build the bookshelf on top of the Laminate?
 
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Old 10-22-14, 06:25 PM
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Welcome.

Built-ins should not be placed on floor. If you plan to lay floor before building the unit, plan footprint accordingly.
I'm not too familiar though with vapor barriers, I would wait for more input on placing bookshelf.
 
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Old 10-22-14, 06:53 PM
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Is this below grade? If so, check with the manufacturer to see if the laminate will be OK to be placed there. Some are not. Laminate, in general is substandard, IMO, for below grade. Do as Brian said, or install the bookcase and floor around it.
 
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Old 10-22-14, 07:02 PM
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Thank you for the reply and welcome.

Do you mean that built ins should be completely hung from the wall (beyond my confidence level) or that they should not be placed on bare concrete floor?

Edit: @ Chandler Does grade refer to ground level? If so, then yes, it's above grade.
 
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Old 10-22-14, 07:36 PM
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No, the built in can be placed on the concrete, but at the peril of pending moisture. Grade does mean ground level.
 
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Old 10-23-14, 07:13 PM
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While I agree that a floating laminate floor should not be installed under the bookcase it may not be a huge problem. My (almost) floor-to-ceiling bookcase some twelve to fifteen feet wide, IS sitting on the (high end) floating laminate floor and it has caused no problem whatsoever. Been that way for well over ten years now.
 
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Old 10-23-14, 08:19 PM
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I would agree with Furd. Heavy objects can sit on floor, you just don't want them bolted down or other. An example would be a piano.
But the built in bookshelves may outlast the floor, so this is why I would isolate them.
 
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Old 10-25-14, 01:50 PM
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Is there any reason why I couldn't place a different type of floor under the bookshelf (where it wouldn't be seen) and then run the laminate right up to the edge of the bookshelf, treating the bookshelf like another wall (when attatching the laminate to it.) ?
I think I may have enough of some tile lying around that doesn't really match anything to place under the bookshelf if this is doable.

@ Furd: Well, the laminate is 7mm, and from everything I hear that's not high end Laminate
 
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Old 10-25-14, 02:12 PM
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7mm is, as you state, not high end. You can take tile and stack under the cabinet, bringing your laminate to within 1/4 to 1/2" of the perimeter of the cabinet, then use shoe molding attached to the cabinet, not the flooring, to trim it out.
 
 

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