Questions regarding 3/4" oak hardwood floor being installed on planks

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Old 12-11-14, 01:00 PM
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Question Questions regarding 3/4" oak hardwood floor being installed on planks

Hey everyone, the house we recently purchased had ugly carpet in the 2nd bedroom and everywhere else upstairs was 2.25" oak hardwood flooring, 3/4" thick.

I was able to locate almost identical hardwood flooring from HomeDepot and would like to continue the run from that small hallway into the second bedroom.

The house was built in 1947 so the floor is old planks(seen in the photo). It's fairly straight also but not OSB.

I looked under the hardwood that is run in the rest of the house and doesn't look like anything was put underneath the flooring and above the planks.

So my questions are, should I put anything on the planks and install the oak floor onto it?
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Lastly, I am confused about nails and nail length. My father has installed hardwood in his own home before but I want to make sure I research into this and get the right lengths and such.

I've read that there are nails that torque down into the wood to prevent the boards from lifting.

Here is the floor I found and purchased that matched the rest of the upstairs flooring:
http://www.homedepot.ca/product/moha...g-1825-/811401

Any suggestions/help would be greatly appreciated. I'm trying to do this myself for the first time :-)
 
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Old 12-11-14, 01:27 PM
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There should be felt [roofing/tar paper] between the subfloor and the hardwood. That helps to prevent squeaks. How thick is the existing hardwood? Do you plan to use a floor nailer?
 
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Old 12-11-14, 01:33 PM
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Hey thanks for the reply :-)

I've read about a felt type paper being used but I wasn't sure if it would raise the existing floor or not.

At the door entry, if you can see it in the photo, the original hardwood was stopped and a finishing piece was added. I am not sure if hardwood was in this room once or not but it 3/4" hardwood I purchased slides into the grove of the finishing piece by the door allowing me to continue the run as if it was all installed together.

The room, IIRC, is around 90 SQ.FT, so not huge. I have a compressor and a floor nailer ready to use...just want to understand everything I can before starting it in order to do the best job I can.
 
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Old 12-11-14, 01:36 PM
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Will you be installing raw hardwood or prefinished? I doubt 15 lb felt will make any noticeable difference in the height of the flooring. I assume you know to let the hardwood acclimate in the room before installing.
 
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Old 12-11-14, 03:02 PM
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3/4" hardwood I purchased slides into the grove of the finishing piece by the door
You would be better served by installing a spline in the groove of the existing floor and marrying that to the groove of the new floor. You install flooring with the tongue out so the orientation you have is backwards to the direction you want to go. A spline is just a strip of wood large enough to fit snugly in the grove of both pieces so that you can reverse direction of the installation. Glue the spline in place, I would start short on the 15# felt paper at that first piece and run a bead of liquid nails under the spline side (note use liquid nails for subfloor only, not regular liquid nails). Leave expansion room at the walls (best attained by removing the baseboard molding).
 
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Old 12-12-14, 03:29 AM
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Are you planning on changing direction of the flooring? If not, then I would install a piece of flooring across the threshold in the manner Z said, then allow the flooring to continue in the same direction. You'll never match end grains, and the threshold piece of flooring will help break it up without actually having an obtrusive actual threshold.
 
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Old 12-12-14, 02:53 PM
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What is referred to as "felt paper" is not actually felt. So it isn't very thick at all.
 
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