Engineered wood flooring

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Old 02-23-15, 09:39 PM
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Engineered wood flooring

Was just discussing flooring options with a contractor tonight.

My thought was to get the original red oak [2.5"?] flooring refinished even if it is not perfect [since it has many nail holes around the edges from carpeting strips]. He suggested engineered flooring which I had not ever heard about.

He suggested laying it over the current flooring so my main question is: Is this an accepted way to do this [reasoning that he can better match elevation changes from flooring in other rooms].

I also wonder how natural is the look. I really like my oak floor because it is original. Also, I have seen many remodels where new things have been installed and just look out-of-place in homes that are older -- whether it is due to style or poor workmanship I cannot say.

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Old 02-23-15, 11:33 PM
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Engineered hardwood flooring looks VERY nice. Do not mistake this with laminate flooring which is only a picture of wood on a fiberboard backing. Whether or not it will look "right" in your home is more a matter of the wood species and the finish color than anything. I suggest that you go to Great Floors and look at examples of engineered hardwood. I don't remember where in Washington you live so here is their store finder.

Find a Store - Location Directory

(I have no connection whatsoever with Great Floors.)
 
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Old 02-24-15, 03:37 AM
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A shoddy installation will ruin the look of any flooring regardless of type.

Is your contractor recommending a floating engineered floor, a glue together floating engineered floor, or does he want to nail down on top of your existing hardwood?

Options one or two are acceptable. Option three gives me pause as you would have 2 different floors competing for expansion and contraction rights. I would recommend instead, removing the current, adding 3/4" Advantech and then nail down the new floor.
 
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Old 02-24-15, 08:23 PM
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Good idea Furd, in the Renton/Kent area so there is a location not far away.

Cannot remember about the method of installation but, I will need to find out. Really not liking the idea of covering over the floor though.
 
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Old 02-25-15, 03:49 AM
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What were his reasons for not refinishing your existing floor? Are there just nail holes or did a portion of the wood break out when the tack strip was removed? Any water stains?
 
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Old 02-25-15, 07:06 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr
What were his reasons for not refinishing your existing floor? Are there just nail holes or did a portion of the wood break out when the tack strip was removed? Any water stains?
One reason from what I recall is that the wood flooring is sitting lower than some of the other flooring [kitchen 'Pergo' in pic and carpeting in rooms]. However, we are getting rid of laminate in pic so that will drop a bit [replacing with vinyl flooring]. Cannot see the drop in pic but the laminate was installed over the old vinyl.

Mainly nail holes [in pic] around the edges. A few gaps where boards will need to be butted up against each other.

No water stains -- at least not major and I am okay with it if it is not perfect as long as it looks natural.

A major factor is the removal of a wall and transitioning between the two rooms. Haven't figured out a good solution for that since they may not be able to match the flooring.

Part of it may also be that it is easier [and more cost-effective] for them to just replace -- not really sure.
 
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Old 02-25-15, 09:53 AM
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Looks like that might be white oak. One work around when you can't match the flooring is to pull up the hardwood in a closet and use it for the repairs and then use whatever in the closet.
 
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Old 02-25-15, 01:00 PM
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Although her home is just outside of Mill Creek it was the Renton Great Floors where my sister picked out the new floors for the house. It could have been because she was living just north of Auburn at the time.

I generally recommend pre-finished flooring because the old Swedish finish required moving out of the house for a minimum of three days and often a full week because of the smell during application. From what I read the new water-based finishes are almost as good without the waiting period. Refinishing your current floors may be a viable option.
 
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