Laminate installation gap

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  #1  
Old 03-18-15, 09:39 PM
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Laminate installation gap

Hi all. First time taking on a flooring project. Decided to do my bedroom first so if I jack it up I don't feel quite as bad lol.

Lifted up the carpet cleaned the subfloor and removed the baseboards.

1. There is an uneven gap going all the way around room ranging from 3-14mm dry wall to subfloor. is this normal? Do I need to fill the gaps with something?

2. Assuming I do not need to fill in the gap s, mentioned above. When I install my laminate that requires 1/4 inch spacing....will the portions of the wall that have the gap already create a problem? Meaning those areas will have a much larger expansion area and I'm worried that might cause my floor to expand too much and separate... if that makes sense.

3. There are slight gaps in my subfloor where different pieces of wood were nailed. The gaps are perfectly spaced and clearly intentional but I can also feel air/sound coming through. Do these need to be sealed or are the gaps designed specifically for air circulation/controlling dampness etc?

4. Near the door... there is an elevation between two pieces of subfloor... kinda like a peak being created when you push stacks of paper together. I'm assuming this will have to be flattened and level prior to floor install. Safe to just sand it down until flat?? Rest of the floor seems pretty rough and "gritty" but doesn't feel like I would need to take additional action.

5. My laminate has a thin pad attached to it. do I still need additional under layment?? What if I want additional underlayment, is that still safe for the laminate??

6. Why are you guys awesome?

 

Last edited by RedZoneOS; 03-18-15 at 10:10 PM. Reason: added picture
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  #2  
Old 03-19-15, 03:41 AM
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1. No, that gap is normal and will be covered when you reinstall your base molding.
2. The gap is 1/2" deep since that is the thickness of sheetrock. Lay your laminate to where it falls directly under the vertical plane of the sheetrock. Again, your base molding will cover it.
3. If non- tongue and groove sub flooring was used, yes, you will likely have an air gap, but it presents no real problem as long as it is at least 3/4" A second layer of 1/2" would stiffen the floor and eliminate such cracks especially if you only have 1/2" subflooring.
4. Yes, the area should be sanded to where it is reasonably flat.
5. Only add underlayment if the manufacturer calls for it. If not, then you could void your warranty by adding something that would make it too pliable and cause joint problems.
6. We don't sleep, we have intravenous coffee 24-7, and most of us have BTDT. Just kidding. Thanks for the compliment.
Don't forget you will need to undercut all your door jambs so any additional subflooring and/or flooring will slip under it for a clean look.
 
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Old 03-19-15, 09:02 PM
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Thanks for your response but I'm still a bit confused.

I expected to put the laminate spaced 1/4 inch away from the wall and then the baseboard on top of that.

Since there is already a gap present in some sections I was worried that my spacing of 1/4 inch plus the additional gap would give "too much" expansion space.

You're saying to just put the laminate all the way up against the beginning portion of the gap (essentially where the wall would normally meet the floor)Since the 1/2 inch is already there???

If that's right.... my issue is that the gap isn't even on all 4 sides and in some spots doesn't even exist. Options would be to leave it, space the floor and move on... or cut a gap into all areas so it's even. Or fill it and then space the laminate 1/4 inch out.

Sorry. Maybe I'm just over thinking it and confusing myself and you guys lol


Edit. In the picture at the top you see how my sample piece fits perfectly into that gap. That same gap is not even and also missing in various areas. This is what I'm confused about
 
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Old 03-20-15, 03:59 AM
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If your gap is not consistently tall enough all the way around, then leave the 1/4" away from the vertical plane of the sheetrock so it can expand evenly all the way around. Otherwise you may get into a binding situation where the sheetrock is too low. Option to cut the sheetrock exists and would be a good solution since your baseboard will cover it all up anyway. That will give you 1/2" of expansion and fully enough to cover with the baseboard. Technically sheetrock should not touch the subflooring anyway.
 
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