Sand high spot or fill in low spots?


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Old 04-07-15, 08:09 PM
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Sand high spot or fill in low spots?

Floor joists run from left to right opposite of how flooring is laid out. The first floor joist, which runs between the door frames is a high spot where the nails are. Therefore, on either side of the joist are low spots.

Would you sand high spot or fill in low spots on this engineered wood floating click lock install?

Thanks!
 
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Old 04-08-15, 04:16 AM
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Not much can be seen in that pic. How high is high? Is there access from a cellar?
 
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Old 04-08-15, 04:58 AM
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I'll agree that not much can be deciphered from the picture attached.

You mention "where the nails are" is it a break between two pieces of subflooring? Is it that the nail heads have mushroomed the wood as they were driven at an angle too close to the edge of the panel? Does the floor lay flat relative to the balance of the hall, yet stand proud of the floor near the far wall? Lay a straight edge across the hump and show us what you see from a perpendicular to the joists picture.
 
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Old 04-16-15, 08:26 AM
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@Pulpo, @ czizzi, Thanks!
My apologies, working on getting better pics...

Originally Posted by czizzi
...You mention "where the nails are" is it a break between two pieces of subflooring?
Yes

Originally Posted by czizzi
...Is it that the nail heads have mushroomed the wood as they were driven at an angle too close to the edge of the panel?
Not sure about the angle or being too close. It seems like the subfloor where the nail heads are just is higher than the high traffic areas on either side of them going into bath and going into bedroom.

Originally Posted by czizzi
...Does the floor lay flat relative to the balance of the hall, yet stand proud of the floor near the far wall?
Again, not sure about hallway, since it still has finished parquet flooring installed...I ripped old carpeting & padding up from this subfloor.

Originally Posted by czizzi
...Lay a straight edge across the hump and show us what you see from a perpendicular to the joists picture.
I have a STANLEY 77-500 IntelliLaser™ Pro Stud Sensor and Laser Line Level. How can I use it as my straight edge here?
 
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Old 04-16-15, 02:38 PM
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Your laser level will only be as accurate as the level of the floor relative to the laser line, if that makes sense. However, set the level on a chair and project a level line across to the wall behind the area in question. Set level on the bubbles on the laser, and then cross check with a conventional level with the line projected on the wall. Then you use a yard stick or metal ruler to take measurements around the floor. If the measurements grow, you have a dip, if the measurement shrink, you have a bump.
 
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Old 04-16-15, 04:43 PM
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Just jumping in here, but is that floor visiable from below? If so, can you identify the beam or beams that are associated with the high spot?

Bud
 
 

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