1/8" Wood Recommendation for Refacing Stair Risers?


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Old 04-17-15, 04:31 PM
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Question 1/8" Wood Recommendation for Refacing Stair Risers?

My home, which was built about a year and a half ago, came with carpeted stairs. It was cheap carpeting, so we're going to replace with wood stairs.

The wood underneath the carpet is pretty cheap, so we're gonna pop off the treads and replace with stained/poly'ed oak.

As for the risers, we want to get some decent 1/8" wood to paint/poly and attach to the front of the current risers. I'm just not sure what to get. I was checking out both oak and maple plywood at the hardware store today and it just looks like if I hit that with a circular saw, it's going to split all along the edges.

Any recommendations for what I should buy to reface those risers?
 
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Old 04-17-15, 05:42 PM
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If you are only going to reface them, an oak plywood to match your new treads would work. 1/8" you can cut with a straight edge and razor knife. No need for a saw. If you have a table saw, all the more better, just leave your blade really low, only protruding through the plywood 1/2 tooth or so.
 
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Old 04-17-15, 06:01 PM
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Why? any carpeted stairs I've ever seen use OSB or plywood for risers.
"Paint, poly" makes no since.
Pick one or the other.
 
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Old 04-17-15, 06:06 PM
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I think the OP was leaving an opening for either paint or poly on the risers. OSB isn't pretty stained and a judicious application of thin veneer could enhance it quite a bit.
 
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Old 04-17-15, 06:16 PM
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Paint with poly top coat is the way to go imo
 
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Old 04-17-15, 10:12 PM
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Yeah, the risers are made with particle board with don't look good once you pull out the staples from the carpet. I think I'll give that 1/8" oak ply a shot. Thanks.
 
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Old 04-18-15, 04:29 AM
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Paint with poly top coat is the way to go imo
While many folks think that way, there is no need to apply poly over enamel. The biggest difference between poly and enamel is the pigments. A quality enamel will wear just as good/long without poly being applied over it. Poly would also complicate any paint touch up needed.

If you stain and apply 2 coats of poly to the treads and do the same for the risers [or prime and first coat of enamel] before installing them you will save yourself time on the finishing along with only tying up the staircase for drying time.
 
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Old 04-18-15, 05:17 AM
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Poly over latex is what I am referring too. I personally have never encountered a situation where a touch up was needed after the poly was applied. It does a very good job at protecting the paint. Again, just my opinion.
 
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Old 04-18-15, 05:20 AM
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A waterbased poly isn't any more durable than a quality latex enamel. If you apply an oil base poly over the latex it will protect it BUT oil base can alter the color of most paints other than the dark colors.
Personally, I'd prime and apply 2 coats of waterborne enamel and call it a day ... well maybe 2-3 days
 
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Old 04-18-15, 05:25 AM
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I don't use latex and poly for the durability, I use it strictly because of the yellowing accosiated with oil paints. Both are equally durable in my opinion, I just prefer working with the latex and poly.
 
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Old 04-18-15, 05:33 AM
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Latex and waterborne enamels don't yellow. Waterborne dries to almost as hard a film as oil base but with a quicker drying time and no yellowing. While there is a wide range in the quality of the different latex enamels, the few different brands of waterborne I've used have all been top notch.
 
 

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