Lines in flooring after refinishing


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Old 06-02-15, 05:24 PM
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Lines in flooring after refinishing

I just had my hardwood floors refinished. Now there's some lines in it that are perpendicular to the grain. I can feel some of them, so it's got to be from the sanding. See pics below. Anyone seen anything like this? Did they use the wrong sander?



 
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Old 06-02-15, 06:37 PM
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It is definitely from the sander. Its not necessarily due to the wrong sander, (in this case it is from a drum sander) but more so due to a lack of experiance using it. The only fix is to resand the floor.
 
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Old 06-02-15, 06:47 PM
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Looks like grooves left by a drum sander being operated by an inexperienced person. Did you you do your "due diligence" in checking the credentials and previous jobs done by the refinishing contractor?
 
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Old 06-02-15, 06:50 PM
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No I did not check on this guy. Insurance company recommended him. This job was from a claim I filed due to some extensive ice dam damage.

Also, I shouldn't have to ask, but, this is definitely unacceptable, yes?
 
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Old 06-02-15, 06:51 PM
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Exactly, it looks as if he pushed too hard on the machine, to remove a particular spot. I used to do it when I scrubbed tile floors with a rotary machine. Apparently, too much pressure was applied.
 
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Old 06-02-15, 07:45 PM
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Insurance company recommended him.
Too late now but you have to be VERY wary of contractors recommended by insurance adjusters. The insurance company wants to settle for the least amount of money and will often suggest barely adequate, or sometimes even sub-standard, contractors. You do NOT have to use the contractor suggested by the insurance adjuster and should always do an independent review of any contractor prior to hiring them.
 
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Old 06-02-15, 08:03 PM
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Too much starting and stopping and back and forth. You have to keep a drum sander moving.
 
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Old 06-03-15, 04:56 AM
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I agree, the drum sander wasn't kept moving - while drum sanders are the most efficient way to strip the old floor and level the wood it does take skill to operate them correctly. Have you paid the contractor yet?
 
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Old 06-03-15, 07:06 AM
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No, hasn't been paid yet. I'm meeting with the boss today to show him.
 
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Old 06-03-15, 07:11 AM
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As mentioned earlier, sanding the floor down and starting over is the only fix. IF those areas won't be overly noticeable after the furniture is put back in the room you might consider leaving it as is at a reduced price ..... BUT the customer deserves to get what he paid for so don't let yourself get talked into that if you aren't sure you can live with it!
 
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Old 06-03-15, 09:04 AM
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It is going to be resanded. Fortunately insurance is paying.
 
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Old 07-01-15, 11:59 AM
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How many coats of poly should be applied? They put 2 on, but it's not as shiny and smooth as an original floor.
 
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Old 07-01-15, 12:08 PM
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Three is my standard but two is common.

Did they sand between the coats?
 
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Old 07-01-15, 02:55 PM
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2-3 coats is the norm with 3 being preferred. The floor should always be sanded [or screened] between coats with the sanding dust removed. Poly comes in 3 basic sheens; gloss, semi-gloss and satin. Do you know what you had originally compared to what they are using?
 
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Old 07-02-15, 05:51 AM
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I would say I had gloss then. Very smooth and shiny.
 
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Old 07-02-15, 08:59 AM
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It would not be surprising if they used a lower gloss first is to help hide any potential defects this time around.
 
 

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