Click-Flooring Problem

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  #1  
Old 06-17-15, 04:47 PM
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Click-Flooring Problem

Is it possible to remove and replace ONLY 1/5 of a floor, where the damage is bordered by two adjoining walls? ie: a corner area about 6' x 8' in a 30x20 room.

I've tried reasoning it out. But it's a bit mind-numbing when considering the 36"x4" floor pieces have a tongue or a groove on all 4 edges. And placing them requires room for working each piece. I never installed before.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-17-15, 04:54 PM
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Welcome to the forums. I am assuming it is laminate. The floor will need to be unzipped from the tongue side for ease of replacement, so how far is a wall from the tongue side of the flooring? Hopefully you can get some additional flooring to match what you have, for surely you will damage a deal of it upon removal. You may want to post pictures of what you are doing so we can see what you see. Good luck with it. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
  #3  
Old 06-17-15, 05:35 PM
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I have successfully replaced a small section of click-lock laminate in the middle of a large floor.

I cut out a section around the damage using a circular saw set just deep enough to cut through the planks. Then I carefully pried out the cut pieces. You have to remove the pieces all the way to factory edges. To replace the boards, I had to carefully shave off the "bump" of the click joint in some places so they would mate by sliding without lifting. And on one end of each plank and one edge of the last plank I had to remove the bottom of the groove so the plank could drop down on the mating piece from above and not click. Per manufacturer, these places were spot glued with wood glue since they don't have the full joint to keep them in place. Repair looked great and it has held up for a couple of years now. Hope this helps.
 
  #4  
Old 06-17-15, 06:17 PM
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Carbide I am surprised you did it in the MIDDLE of the floor. If you did that then I can certainly do mine. My damaged boards run right up to the walls, in perpendicular directions. Meaning in one direction I've got the 4 in ends, in other direction I've got the 36" side.

Getting an iphone tomorrow so will try to get a pic here.
 
  #5  
Old 06-23-15, 09:45 AM
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Here's photos of floor

It's a 10x10 area... click-floor. I included pic of floor piece. Tongue on one end, groove on other. With each long side also having a tongue or groove. Baseboards are removed.

The room area shown continues on the couch side another 15 feet, which is not damaged. I'm guessing I start

1. removing from the left of photo to the right.. and
2. begin installing from right to left.

Advise if I'm wrong; provide pointers if helpful, thanx.
 
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  #6  
Old 06-23-15, 12:10 PM
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You should be ok removing them as far as needed to get all the damaged ones out. I assume you have more of the same type to replace the damaged ones with. Before reinstalling make double sure all the locks are still intact on each peice. It wouldnt hurt to even add a few dabs of glue as you go. In my experiance they pieces do not hold together as well after the second time they have been installed.
 
  #7  
Old 06-23-15, 02:33 PM
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re-installing....

No. I bought all new matching pieces.
 
  #8  
Old 06-23-15, 03:43 PM
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How and/or what damaged the flooring pieces? Is that a basement we are looking at? If so, laminate is not rated for below grade installations. Which may be the cause of your issues. If water damage or moisture damage, you will be fighting an uphill battle.

It is one thing to replace a singleton piece by cutting it out and glue it back in. But I disagree with Carbides suggestion that you can glue a whole section of laminate back in. Laminate floats and needs to move. He may have been fortunate with his relative humidity, but under normal circumstances, a bunch of glue would cause more harm than good.
 
  #9  
Old 06-23-15, 04:42 PM
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I have to disagree with you czizzi about the glue. As long as the flooring is only glued to each other, and not the subfloor it will still be free to expand and contract. The floor moves as a single unit, not just individual pieces. All floating floors used to be glued together until the click system came out.
 
  #10  
Old 06-23-15, 05:03 PM
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more...

Basement. Damage not caused by moisture but by ice dams causing water to run down walls. I'm moving in 2 years. Not worried. Been here 30. No real problems beforehand.

Have no plan to glue anything.

Is my planned direction for removing and replacing correct?
 
  #11  
Old 06-23-15, 05:12 PM
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yes, your plan will work fine. Depending on which way the floor was installed originally, you may be locking your planks in opposite of normal installation, but it will still all go together fine. Just make sure each peice is fully locked on the long and short sides before moving to the next.
 
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Old 06-23-15, 05:50 PM
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OK Keith, hey - everyone glue your laminate. Keith says it is OK.

Let me ask a question - Why does not every manufacturer of laminate recommend that to save hastles down the road, simply glue all your laminate floor pieces together? That is the key, simply glue it all together. Forget about the click lock, that is a minor inconvenience. Glue is all you need.

Hmmmm, why would it void the warranty? Puzzling... Why not forget all standard practices and just do your own thing? Sounds great to me. Keith said it is OK...

Well, every manufacturer, and every flooring has a recommended installation method. Many can be both glued, glued down, nailed, stapled and floated. But they are called out in the installation instructions. If not, then that is not an approved installation method. Regardless of what Keith thinks. I have never to date run into a laminate flooring that recommends glue together as a preferred method of floating. Engineered yes, but usually only the thinner floors (3/8"). So, I will stick with recommended installation procedures as I hate call backs for issues.
 
  #13  
Old 06-23-15, 06:09 PM
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Czizzi, Every floating floor system before the click lock was glued. The click lock was designed to ease installation, and make it a DIY job. I am not saying you must glue every click floor, I am saying that any click floor will perform as intended if it is glued. Most click flooring I have worked with actually give it as an option but not a requirement. Furthermore, most manufacturers do require glueing if the installation is in an area prone to moisture. It has nothing to do with "what I say", but what the manufacturer says.

Read for yourself direct from the manufacturer.

How to Apply Glue to a Laminate Flooring Plank | Kronotex USA
 

Last edited by Keith Weagle; 06-23-15 at 07:06 PM.
  #14  
Old 06-24-15, 09:29 AM
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ok

Thanx everyone for the help. I'll begin reconstructive surgery shortly.
 
  #15  
Old 06-24-15, 01:56 PM
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Keith is right. On the first laminate floors we used strap clamps to hold the floor together until the glue dried.
 
  #16  
Old 06-27-15, 10:42 AM
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Reducing depth of cricular saw.

re: removing boards

Any idea how to do this 1/8" so I don't hit the cement? Thanx. I'll be traversing about 150 running feet of boards.

Or, should I make a jig like 2 lengths of wood and keep moving it as I do the job. It would attach and re-attach to the floor, using a couple small screws...? The underside of the saw is an awkward place to attach something.
 
  #17  
Old 06-27-15, 11:10 AM
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What is it that you need to cut out? You should be removing the flooring from the wall to the bad spot and then replacing it.
 
  #18  
Old 06-28-15, 07:12 AM
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cutting

It's not that easy, Keith. You're right, though, there's a lot less need for the saw. But still needed. The complication is when the board to remove is in between 2 other boards not needing removal. And since all boards are staggered, if I don't leave some boards alone I'll end up removing the whole floor. I remove the board by sawing right up the middle of it then taking out its 2 halves. I replace it by sliding the new board along the floor and into place. I can not load the new board in as you would in original installation since there's no space.

Note I am only removing 8 feet from the wall, not the entire 25 feet of room. And it's not just one course of boards. It's 12 courses, each running between 6 and 10 feet out from wall.

(I rigged the saw yesterday to adjust blade depth. Works great.)
 

Last edited by pmarc1; 06-28-15 at 07:43 AM.
  #19  
Old 06-28-15, 08:05 AM
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Normally, we would actually remove the entire floor back to the damaged areas. So in your picture above, I would remove all the flooring from the wall on the left to to the damaged boards on the right. It sounds like what you are doing is trying to work your way back from the wall with the end cuts to replace them. I dare say, it would have been way faster to remove that whole section of floor than the way you are doing it. They come apart and go back together very fast, especially when you dont have to cut anything.

It sounds like you have it under control now though.
 
  #20  
Old 06-28-15, 08:17 AM
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ok

I'm not sure If I'm doing it exactly the way you said I am. But you may be right - LOL. And I'm sure I'm less than efficient. But when you consider I'm saving $5,000 doing it myself, not bad.

Every contractor wanted the whole job or nuthin. So be it. They're happy. I'm happy.
 
  #21  
Old 06-28-15, 08:22 AM
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$5000 ?!?! To do what, take the old floating floor up and put a new one down? How big is the floor?
 
  #22  
Old 06-28-15, 09:01 AM
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25x22 incl cost of boards
 
  #23  
Old 06-28-15, 09:41 AM
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Wow, that is extremely high, even for some of the most expensive laminate.
 
  #24  
Old 06-28-15, 11:05 AM
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I think he is overly ambitious based on all the glue comments previously. It will actually cause more work not less. The easiest and fastest without any cutting is to take painters tape and put a piece on every end cut along the wall. Then label them each in reverse order of how you remove them. Start with odd numbers on the left, even numbers on the right. Unzip the whole floor back to your needed repairs. Then reassemble the floor. All your cuts are already made, just re-install based on the labeling already done. Every plank in the field is the same, you can just grab and go, no need to label.

If you need help getting the planks to interlock, let us know. There are lots of videos on how to install laminate. You are making it more complicated than it should be.

Not the way to assemble laminate involves inserting the tongue into the groove, not the other way around.
 
  #25  
Old 06-28-15, 11:13 AM
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I'm not using glue. 20% of the boards need replacing. Not having trouble getting boards to interlock.
 
  #26  
Old 06-28-15, 12:01 PM
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running into problems ...

1. I assume you want all boards removed (out to the damaged ones), not just bad ones.

2. What order of removal do you suggest? From couch to steps or from the wall with white closet door, out?

3. My biggest confusion is removing boards.
 

Last edited by pmarc1; 06-28-15 at 12:50 PM.
  #27  
Old 06-28-15, 01:31 PM
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Yes, You should be removing all the boards starting from the wall with the steps (on the left of your picture) the entire width of the room, to the couch (if that is as far as you need to go to get the damaged ones out). Then you will work your way back replacing the damaged ones with new ones.

It is next to impossible to replace them coming from the wall with the closet door

As czizzi stated, keep track of the order you removed them and put them back down the same way.
 
  #28  
Old 06-28-15, 03:42 PM
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ok

I'm using a 1 in chisel to losen a board at its end, and also its side a bit. Is this right? Otherwise I don't get enough force on the board to pull out. Sometimes I damage that board, but I have lots of new ones.
 
  #29  
Old 06-28-15, 04:04 PM
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You may need to pry the first row away from the wall, but your baseboard should cover any damage. After that, the pieces should come apart by simply lifting them up.
 
  #30  
Old 06-28-15, 07:20 PM
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here's what's removed...

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Boards in the middle, with 2 damaged areas removed on both sides.

Can replacing happen now or do I have to remove the middle area?
 
  #31  
Old 06-29-15, 03:37 AM
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You "can" replace it like that, but it will be alot of work and will almost certain involve the need to but locks off some of the prices and glue them.


What you need to do is remove the rest of the floor from where you have it now to the other end of the room (the wall behind where you are standing in that pic).

I know it sounds like alot of work, but it not. Even for an amateur it should only take 10-20 minutes to remove the rest of the flooring, and then an hour or two tops to have everything replaced. If I were doing this for a customer, I would be on and out in an hour.

You are making alot more work for yourself trying to remove just that small area in a direction the floor was never meant to be taken part or installed from.
 
  #32  
Old 06-29-15, 06:14 AM
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ok

Unfortunately I'm a spaceshot. I will never number 150 boards without losing place. And you're right. There's a lot of cutting if done wrong.

Yesterday I was able to slide a board (into place and click) between two others. It looks perfect today. But this is very risky for several reasons. Thinking.

I think I need a 1-person floor guy. The others were teams.
 

Last edited by pmarc1; 06-29-15 at 06:56 AM.
  #33  
Old 06-29-15, 01:06 PM
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You only need to keep track of the cut boards on each end, everything else is a full peice so it don't matter where it goes back.
 
  #34  
Old 06-29-15, 01:32 PM
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Unfortunately I'm a spaceshot.
LOL! No, you are just over thinking things, that is all.

Listen, remove the first row and set it aside with any cuts labeled "1st row". Then, as you take apart the subsequent rows, don't label, just push (slide) them forward 4" to the space that the previous row was in. That way, all the pieces are still positioned out on the floor in the correct order just waiting to be re-clicked into place. In the industry we call it "racking" the floor or having everything sitting right in front of where it needs to be. Here is a picture of what racking a floor looks like.

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  #35  
Old 06-29-15, 02:44 PM
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ha

LOL. I was wondering about this since most boards are the same length.

This a very tough medium to explain something like this but I am gracious you're hanging in with me!
 
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