Engineered on 2nd floor plywood subfloor...Float or glue down?


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Old 07-01-15, 02:48 PM
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Engineered on 2nd floor plywood subfloor...Float or glue down?

I'm planning to install engineered wood (3/8", "random length" x 4 3/4" wide) on 3/4" plywood subfloor in 2nd floor bedrooms and hallways.

If I understand correctly, floating click-lock install is supposed to be easier but requires an underlayment/moisture barrier i.e. "Floor Muffler" plus T-Moldings in all doorways as well as an Overlap Reducer or similar transition from hallway to top stair tread, which would give me a little trip bump right at the top of the stairs and in all doorways. ;(

That said, I don't believe I've ever walked on a floating engineered click-lock floor and other than all of the required transition "trip bumps", I'm also concerned about the not real "feel" and potential that even leveling the subfloor can still result in a "bouncy" floating floor.

Would you float or glue down and why?
 
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Old 07-01-15, 03:20 PM
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Recently, I was a helper on a floating tongue & groove floor job, with an underlayment. It had no "bounce" feeling after we finished. That was the second floating floor job that I did with the same guy. The first floor didn't have the "bounce" feeling either. In between those two jobs, I did a glue down job. Anyone walking on either type floor wouldn't know the difference.

The floating floor isn't that much easier, to install. It takes a sharp eye to make sure that you don't lose the "square" during the installation. An extra 1/16" between two pieces can throw off the entire floor.
 
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Old 07-01-15, 04:39 PM
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What size planks, which underlayment & what type of sub-floor on your floating tongue & groove floor jobs?
 
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Old 07-01-15, 05:03 PM
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If your subfloor is level and within specs for the floor you are installing, you should not notice that it is floating unless you drop something on it and it will sound a little different. So, unless you are a klutz and constantly dropping things you nor your friends will ever know it is a floating floor. On the other hand, if yours subfloor and joists are subject and under rated, any floor you put in will be noticeably bouncy.

As far as the stair nosing is concerned, many floors come with accessories some to include stair nosing. Sometimes they can be installed as a flush option, others not. But it is worth noting during your flooring search as a needed item. There are thousands of floors out there, find one that meets your need from both an aesthetic and functional perspective.
 
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Old 07-01-15, 05:52 PM
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c1351996, The T&G was on a slab. The planks were 4" wide. The lengths varied up to 3'. The underlayment was a green roll. I'm not sure of the material.

The job before that was 18" squares that went over another kitchen floor. The underlayment was a red & white roll, sold by Home Depot.

The advantage of a floating floor is that it can be easily replaced. If you choose a glue down, you better be sure that you like it.
 
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Old 07-03-15, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by czizzi
If your subfloor is level and within specs for the floor you are installing, you should not notice that it is floating unless you drop something on it and it will sound a little different. So, unless you are a klutz and constantly dropping things you nor your friends will ever know it is a floating floor. On the other hand, if yours subfloor and joists are subject and under rated, any floor you put in will be noticeably bouncy.
The joists and 3/4" plywood subfloor are solid & level but not exactly flat within specs in some areas. That said, how does one know whether to grind the high spots of fill in low spots? Oh and I'm not concerned about being a klutz and constantly dropping things but more curious how the bw's heels will sound?

Originally Posted by czizzi
As far as the stair nosing is concerned, many floors come with accessories some to include stair nosing. Sometimes they can be installed as a flush option, others not. But it is worth noting during your flooring search as a needed item. There are thousands of floors out there, find one that meets your need from both an aesthetic and functional perspective.
I have my flooring already: Home Legend Oak Gunstock - Engineered HDF Click lock Yes, it comes with stair nose accessories. Floating calls for a non-flush "trip bump" at the top of the stairs but glue down has a a flush option. This is one of my concerns with floating vs glue down....Floating requires all these transition "trip bumps" at all doors and at top of stairs, while it appears, glue down can be installed without transitions and with a flush stair nose option.
 
 

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