About time for a new floor


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Old 09-08-15, 01:05 PM
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About time for a new floor

I have linoleum flooring in my kitchen and it had a pretty large tear in it, so I cut the flooring into a square shape and tried to patch it with some left over flooring we had. Unfortunately, the amount we had left over wasn't enough, So I have this huge square piece glued and it looks horrible.

Now I have two questions.

1. I am really leaning towards laminate flooring for my kitchen. It is not big at all. I was wanting to do tile, but I want something a bit easier and a little more kid friendly. If the kitchen was more open I would do tile.

a- Is laminate kitchen flooring looked down upon or is it normal?
b- What is a good color that is modern for kitchen flooring, but also something that will seem new for years? I am looking to rent/sell the home in about 2 years.

2. If I did end up getting a laminate, do I need anything to put over the linoleum or can I put it right over it? The part of the floor that I have the linoleum patch is pretty large, so that I am worried about. If I did have to tear out the existing linoleum what would I put down over the baseboard? That is what is under the linoleum I am 99% sure. There is definitely not any kind of concrete backer.

I'd appreciate any help. I can post pics of the patch if needed. Thanks!
 
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Old 09-08-15, 01:19 PM
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Laminate flooring is a bad idea in any wet location and a kitchen qualifies.

What's wrong with doing tile?
 
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Old 09-08-15, 01:26 PM
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The more I see newer kitchens, hardly any have tile. That style seems like it did well in the 90's, but most I see have wood style laminate or tile style laminate. Tile just seems like a nightmare with having to clean the grout so much, if my child fell and smacked her face on it, plus my kitchen is so small with a bunch of different angles. I'm sure it would be a pain to do it. I have never tiled before, but I understand the concept and how to do it.

Why would laminate be bad in wet cases?

I am thinking of something like this as an example..

Innovations Murano Tile 8 mm Thick x 11-3/5 in. Wide x 46-1/4 in. Length Click Lock Laminate Flooring (18.60 sq. ft. / case)-875272 - The Home Depot
 
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Old 09-08-15, 01:33 PM
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Maybe I am calling it the wrong name flooring. I always forget what it is called. Maybe it falls under the engineered flooring.
 
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Old 09-08-15, 01:35 PM
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Laminate and engineered wood are different creatures - laminate is a picture of wood on a fiber-board substrate which swells if it gets wet while engineered wood is more like plywood with a finished layer on top. The latter is much more durable.
 
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Old 09-08-15, 01:39 PM
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Well I don't think I want to go with a wood look. I'm thinking a tile replicate. Engineered is definitely what I was thinking then. Do I need to lay anything under it or remove my linoleum?
 
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Old 09-08-15, 01:45 PM
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Here's a picture to help illustrate the patch..

 
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Old 09-10-15, 06:08 PM
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Are there engineered floors that look like tile?
 
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Old 09-12-15, 12:00 PM
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I bought some premixed patch and level. Would I be fine to level the area around my patch and then lay a vinyl/laminate over it?

I'd appreciate any advise.
 
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Old 09-12-15, 12:24 PM
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Would I be fine to level the area around my patch and then lay a vinyl/laminate over it?
Floating floors would be fine to level and go over what you have. I do not off the top of my head know of a engineered floor that looks like tile. However, there are 100's of different wood looks in both narrow and wide plank format.

Installing any type of vinyl however would require you to work toward a perfectly flat floor without imperfections. This means removing what you have, or installing a new 1/4" underlayment grade plywood layer on top or in place of what you have there. Any (and I mean any) imperfection in the underlayment will telescope through to the surface as a bump or divot.
 
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Old 09-12-15, 12:35 PM
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So would it be better to just remove all of the linoleum?

This is the flooring I am looking at...
TrafficMASTER Allure, 12 in. x 36 in. Cordoba Resilient Vinyl Tile Flooring (24 sq. ft. / case), 211916 at The Home Depot - Mobile
 
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Old 09-12-15, 01:24 PM
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That vinyl look pretty beat up so I would remove it. It also is probably setting on a 1/4" thick plywood underlayment. You may want to remove that as well. Any dents, divots, seams between underlayment sheets need to be skimmed over.

Your choice said "sold online only" so measure well and don't be short.
 
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Old 09-12-15, 01:39 PM
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By skimmed over what do you mean? With a leveling agent like I have or something else?

The only reason I was hesitant about removing the linoleum was because of the mess I would have with removing glue. However, it seems there isn't much glue.

When I remove the trim wood around the wall will I start this vinyl 1/8 inch from the wall? I watched a video that said that and I'm not sure why I would need to do that.
 
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Old 09-12-15, 01:55 PM
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Remove the 1/4" plywood under the vinyl and you don't have to worry about glue.

Skim coat to make a dent or seam flush with the surrounding wood subfloor.

You leave 1/8" so that the vinyl floating floor has room to expand and contract with the seasons. Remember, it floats, so don't bind it in any way, don't nail through it in any way. It should be loose and move should it need to. You will never notice the movement unless you restrict its movement in some way. If it tries to expand and can not, it will tent up and buckle to make up the needed room.
 
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Old 09-12-15, 02:13 PM
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Would the plywood have been installed because of the linoleum? Is this standard to remove the plywood?
 
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Old 09-12-15, 02:19 PM
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Standard procedure for installing linoleum is to first install a layer of underlayment grade plywood 1/4", skim the seam and nail holes to make perfectly smooth, and then install the linoleum. If the linoleum has been replaced in the past, it is not unlikely that you will find a second layer of this sandwich under the first layer.
 
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Old 09-12-15, 07:24 PM
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Thanks czizi. I purchased that vinyl in the link I posted. I saw it at my local home depot for less. I measured my kitchen floor to be 58 Sq ft.. small I know. I purchased 100 Sq ft, so I should have room for errors and an extra box for later, if needed.

I am going to remove the linoleum and try to use the plywood, if possible. If not I will remove that.

Any tips for easily removing the wood molding/trim?

Also any tips for removing the glue? I don't think there is much as I lifted up the linoleum where it is torn and it goes up 5 ft from where I am lifting, so I'm sure only the edges are glued.

Thanks for all the help!

I will update this as I do it.
 
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Old 09-13-15, 02:50 AM
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For the baseboard, stick a 3" stiff putty knife behind the base and wiggle it to loosen and pull it away from the wall. Then insert a pry bar between the putty knife and the baseboard and pry toward the center of the room. It should pull the base and nails out. Pry against the putty knife only and not against the wall. It can leave marks and or punch through. Use a pliers to pull the nails out of the wood from the backside of the molding.

Use heat to loosen the glue. Heat gun, hair dryer, clothes iron (only if old and not going to be used again for clothes)
 
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Old 09-13-15, 04:18 PM
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Well today I started taking off the trim and it didn't go too well. The bottom of a lot or the trim broke off. I believe that was due to the 1/4" plywood board. The trim was pretty beat up so I dont mind that I will have to put new in. I just really dont feel like having to get a miter saw to do anglee cuts.

Tomorrow I'm going to start trying to take off the linoleum. I tried taking off a glued corner and it wasn't the easiest. I was using a hair dryer to help with the glue, but it still was pretty tough to do. If I did take off the 1/4" plywood, would that be pretty tough to do? I'm just nervous that if I take off the plywood I am going to have to do it all again.

I will post pics once I start taking the linoleum off.
 
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Old 09-17-15, 06:14 AM
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Before I try ripping this up, does anyone have any good advise on how I can take off the door base board without causing any damage to it?



 
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Old 09-17-15, 07:25 AM
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I should take that off and put the new flooring under it, right? It would seem odd to have a 1/8" gap there or would it be best to not take it up at all and cut around it?
 
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Old 09-18-15, 03:03 PM
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Anyone know how to take off the door baseboard?
 
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Old 09-18-15, 07:08 PM
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Take the floor up to the door and then cover with shoe molding to hide the seam.
 
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Old 09-19-15, 08:51 AM
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Should I take off this metal part first or cut the door baseboard so it is flush with the rest of the floor?

 
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Old 09-21-15, 08:06 AM
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These are the parts I was referring to:

The blue circle is the metal part. Should I take that off?

The blue dashed line is where I was referring to cut it. Should I cut it there to make it level with the other floor or just cut the new flooring?

 
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Old 09-21-15, 01:56 PM
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To be honest with you, I don't know what that metal is. Logic tells me it is there to cover up the edge of the old floor. But it is unlike any other piece of metal I've ever seen. Also, the block of wood set up is nontraditional from a threshold point of view so I hesitate to advise on that as well.
 
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Old 09-22-15, 06:03 AM
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Would additional images help? The house is from the late 50's and it just cam to my attention that the room that the kitchen goes out to, which is a breezeway, was added on after the house was built. Not sure if that is why it is nontraditional or not.
 
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Old 09-22-15, 11:32 AM
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Take the metal out, if the current linoleum goes under the door, then cut it where it is visible and don't worry about what is underneath. New floor will go up to the wood threshold and be covered either with metal again, or shoe molding.
 
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Old 09-23-15, 06:30 AM
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What if the linoleum doesn't go under the door? Should I still take the metal piece out? I would have had the linoleum out by now, but I decided to paint the walls and do a new back splash before I pull it up. I should be pulling it up this weekend at the latest.
 
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Old 09-26-15, 05:03 PM
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So the linoleum went under the metal, so I will take that off.

Here is a pic of it without the linoleum there...



Do I need to take off all of the glue that was under the linoleum? It was only applied on the edges of it. It is not thick at all. I will for sure take it off if it is the right thing to do. I can barely even tell the glue is raised from the baseboard. Here is a pic of the glue where there is the most of it...



I am definitely not going to remove the baseboards as they are in great shape and I fear what is underneath the baseboards now. Do I have to put any sealant in the crevices between the baseboards? Also what about the little metal staples? The staples for the most part are flush in the plywood. Only a couple are out a tiny bit.





Then I have a couple of places that a little bit of the plywood came up. I have to fill those, correct?




Lastly, here is a pic of some of the kitchen floor. You can see where that patch was, since I took this picture I removed all of the glue and it looks very nice and is perfectly flush with the rest of it.

Thanks for all of the help so far.

 

Last edited by pfar54; 09-26-15 at 06:48 PM.
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Old 09-28-15, 06:48 AM
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Also, you can see in the pics I posted the gaps between the plywood and drwall. Do I install the flooring up to the edge of the plywood or an 1/8 inch away from it?

In this link...

Installing Allure Vinyl Plank/Tile | Home Depot Canada

it has the flooring go up to 1/8" away from the trim. My only concerns is that the plywood is not exactly even. I will have to measure to be sure though. If the plywood does not have an even distance away from the drywall, what should I do?



I have left the door moldings in place around the three doors in the room (closet, basement and door that leads outside). Should I do as what is in the link and go and 1/8 an inch around that or should I remove that trim and put the flooring closer to the frame? You can see a picture of the door molding in some of the pics I posted below.
 
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Old 09-28-15, 09:19 AM
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Undercut the door trim so you can hide the edge of the fooring. Mirror the plywood up against the base moldings or at least leave the recommended expansion gap. Cover the edge with shoe molding stained or painted to complement what you have.
 
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Old 09-28-15, 09:39 AM
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Undercut the door trim so you can hide the edge of the fooring.

-Do you mean just to cut some of the bottom of it, so I can slide the flooring under?


Mirror the plywood up against the base moldings or at least leave the recommended expansion gap.

-So go all the way up to the end of the plywood or at least the 1/8 gap recommended? I took out all of my molding.

Cover the edge with shoe molding stained or painted to complement what you have.

-I believe with my old molding they lined the entire thing with shoe molding, so just do the same for the entire trim? What if the plywood is not evenly installed?
 
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Old 09-30-15, 09:21 AM
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Do I have to take of the glue around the edges where it was? There is hardly any glue around the edges. Below you can see a picture of the glue. That spot is the most there was, the other spots are maybe half of that, if that much.
 
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Old 09-30-15, 02:54 PM
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Please link to the exact floor you are going to install so that I can check the specs. On traditional sheet vinyl, if you can feel the ridges, then it needs to be skimmed smooth or removed.
 
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Old 09-30-15, 06:29 PM
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Why didn't anyone suggest vinyl click flooring? It is the perfect solution for someone who wants the ease of installation of a laminate floor but in a wet location. It is also sold in tile patterens.
 
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Old 10-01-15, 06:16 AM
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I'm fine with this installation as it seems very easy to do. I just want to be sure of a few things before I install it, so that I do not have any issues later on.
 
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Old 10-01-15, 04:08 PM
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Sorry for making you post the link to your flooring twice, I had parallel posts going and got hem crossed.

Your Allure states in the installation instructions that if you are going over old linoleum that has an embossed texture or tile with grout, then those floors should be skimmed smooth. That said, if the glue in question it raised with texture, I would skim it smooth to be on the safe side.
 
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Old 10-02-15, 06:11 AM
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No problem at all.

Alright, I will remove the glue, I think most of it can stay as I think the only thing that remains of it is a discoloring on the wood from where the glue was. There are only a couple of spots like the picture I posted.

Floor should hopefully be going in this weekend.
 
 

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