Refinishing floor and changing color

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Old 09-12-15, 07:58 AM
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Refinishing floor and changing color

hello, I bought a old house and the flooring is oak. It is currently has a natural light color and i plan to change the color to dark brown. i only know that I need to sand the floor first and i now need some help on what needs to be done next. When do i apply the stain and do I need to sand after i apply the stain. How many coats of stain and then when so I use polyurethane? Can somebody please guide me?
 
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Old 09-12-15, 10:02 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

First the floor needs to be sanded down to bare raw wood, then the stain can be applied [after removing the dust] It's never a good idea to apply more than 1 coat of stain. Once the stain is dry you're ready for the 1st coat of poly. It generally takes 3 coats of poly with a light sanding and dust removal between coats.
 
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Old 09-14-15, 12:16 PM
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One coat of stain - it works by partially soaking into the wood and subsequent coats can't do that. Light scuff sanding (220 grit) before each coat of polyurethane promotes good adhesion between the layers but you have to remove the sanding dust before applying the poly.
 
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Old 09-14-15, 01:18 PM
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Just to clarify, you don't sand the stain coat
 
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Old 09-14-15, 01:33 PM
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Mark - I typically do sand the stain coat. You get good adhesion of the poly without it?
 
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Old 09-14-15, 02:13 PM
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The danger with sanding the stain is removing the stain and having an uneven stain job. I've never had any issues with applying oil base poly directly over oil base stain.
 
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Old 09-14-15, 02:37 PM
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Cool - nothing wrong with taking out a step
 
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