Laminate vs porcelain tile in kitchen


  #1  
Old 11-06-15, 06:43 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 81
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Laminate vs porcelain tile in kitchen

Hi, my wife and I are remodeling our kitchen. We are torn between porcelain tile and laminate. For the tile, it would be harder to install (no experience) and be harder on our feet since we are on a cement slab. The linoleum would be easier to install (installed in two rooms already so we have experience). However I've heard water damage is a real concern for a kitchen so this is why we are so undecided. Do thwy make a sealant you can put on the laminate? Sorry if this has been posted before, but what do you al think? Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 11-06-15, 06:55 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,388
Received 15 Votes on 13 Posts
Laminate in a wet location (kitchen, bath, basement) is always not recommended. One need only to read the warranty on any laminate and you will see that it is void for any water related event. The product swells and there is no sealant to make it work. If you want something softer on your feet, look into a floating vinyl floor - they come in plank and tile formats, and are DIY friendly.
 
  #3  
Old 11-06-15, 07:07 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 14,967
Received 597 Votes on 512 Posts
Google "luxury vinyl tile" or "luxury vinyl plank". Installation is similar to laminate but it is virtually waterproof.
 
  #4  
Old 11-06-15, 08:33 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 81
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you! We will check out your advice. Is underlayment required for vinyl plank?
 
  #5  
Old 11-06-15, 12:01 PM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,388
Received 15 Votes on 13 Posts
Thank you! We will check out your advice. Is underlayment required for vinyl plank?
Most likely no, there are floating and glue down varieties. You need to read specifics for installation over concrete as to whether or not a vapor/moisture barrier is needed. Most of the vinyls are fine on their own, some are paper backed however, so it is best to make that frequent question during your search for flooring.
 
  #6  
Old 11-06-15, 02:11 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 94
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Dupont makes a Laminate that looks like tile and is made specifically for kitchen and baths. I have it in my kitchen, it is over 5 years old and still looks new.
 
  #7  
Old 11-06-15, 02:18 PM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,388
Received 15 Votes on 13 Posts
Dupont makes a Laminate that looks like tile and is made specifically for kitchen and baths
According to Dupont, they have discontinued their laminate flooring.
 
  #8  
Old 11-07-15, 08:26 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 94
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sorry it is pergo and the company says its the only laminate recommended for baths and kitchens
Pergo Presto Lago Slate 8 mm Thick x 7-5/8 in. Wide x 47-5/8 in. Length Laminate Flooring (20.17 sq. ft. / case)-LF000331 - The Home Depot
 
  #9  
Old 11-07-15, 08:44 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,388
Received 15 Votes on 13 Posts
Believe what you want, laminate is not recommended for wet locations.

One need only to read the warranty on any laminate and you will see that it is void for any water related event.
I said this in my first post here. But proof is in the pudding - here is the link to the warranty of the pergo you linked to. http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdf...41b0e1555b.pdf

Here are the passages that pertain to moisture from that warranty above:

Damage resulting
from the use of a jet mop, spray mop, or similar wet mop
with the flooring is not covered by this limited warranty

These limited warranties do not apply to water damage,
including but not limited to water damage caused by
flooding, standing water (water that remains on floor
longer than 30 minutes), leaking pipes, mechanical
failures, appliance leaks or pet urine

These limited warranties do not apply to damage caused by
water or moisture in the subfloor or underneath the flooring,
including but not limited to damage from subfloor hydrostatic
pressure (water or moisture under the floor that is transmitted
to the surface through exerted pressure) or other conditions
that result in water or moisture being below the floor


So, no, it is not rated for kitchens or baths.
 
  #10  
Old 11-08-15, 03:22 PM
sam floor's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: May 2010
Location: floor installer
Posts: 1,067
Received 25 Votes on 20 Posts
Why not use sheet vinyl like an IVC product. It comes 13' 3" wide to help eliminate seams and it's DIY friendly. It can be loose laid.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: