Installing laminate flooring in basement


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Old 12-14-15, 10:07 AM
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Installing laminate flooring in basement

We had an extension put on our house and it included a basement. Now, we have broken through the walls of the original basement (two 5' openings). The original basement was never finished, now we will finish both rooms as one area.

1) The floor area where the two rooms meet, in the doorway, was chipped away. It will need to be filled in and leveled (I am assuming) before installing laminate flooring over it.

What is the best way to smooth this rough area? Each one is 5 feet long and 8 inchs wide, and is just chipped up concrete.

Do I just buy a bag of sacrete and fill it in? I have a bag of thinset left over from a tile job, could I use that?

2) When the laminate flooring is installed over the concrete, I will also have two areas that need a transition.

One, to the laundry/boiler room. this would be a transition from laminate to the concrete floor. Basically, a transition from laminate to no more laminate. I think there will be a piece I can buy to handle this. Is that right?

But the other spot is a transition from laminate to tile. the tile is already installed and it will meet the laminate at an angle. Not quite a 45, but about a 30 degree angle. so i dont see how I can use a pre-made transition that will go into the tongue/groove.

How would you handle this transition?
 
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Old 12-14-15, 10:54 AM
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Here should be your question # 1: Do I have a dry enough basement to make installing laminate even a marginally ok thing to do?

Have you done a moisture test on your slab yet? Laminate and water do not mix well and basements tend to be moist enough to destroy laminate.
 
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Old 12-14-15, 11:03 AM
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Doesn't the underlayment handle that problem?

I have not tested for moisture. Although do run a dehumidifier in the basement on a regular basement. does that matter?

I will google how to test for it now.

Assuming my basement is not dry enough, what would you suggest as a flooring? The original basement has 9x9 tiles with cutback adhesive that I do not want to remove.

Then, assuming the basement IS ok for laminate... then what would be the answer to the questions?
 
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Old 12-14-15, 11:13 AM
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Laminate is not rated for below grade installations. The fact that you run a dehumidifier says that you have a moist basement. Look into one of the many luxury vinyl flooring products on the market. Many go together exactly like laminate but are impervious to moisture. We are not talking sheet vinyl, but plank or squares that are installed and floated over your slab. Follow the manufacturers recommendation on use of a vapor barrier.
 
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Old 12-14-15, 11:20 AM
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But I will still need to answer the above questions... no?
 
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Old 12-14-15, 11:57 AM
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Merely filling in the transitions between the two rooms with concrete will most likely crack out again in de course. I would remove the rubble and make the slab pour at last as thick as the basement slabs (~4"). They most likely will crack at the transition between the 3 pieces but be solid enough to support your flooring.

Your transitions will depend on what ultimate flooring you choose. You can add some pictures if you think it will help us see what you see. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
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Old 12-14-15, 12:06 PM
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If it's only an inch or two in depth (or less, it's not consistent) wouldn't thinset work?

as for the transitions, I will post pictures tomorrow.
 
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Old 12-14-15, 12:11 PM
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If it's only an inch or two in depth (or less, it's not consistent) wouldn't thinset work?
No, considering the name of the product "THIN"set it is not meant for thicker applications. It is more of a bonding compound which is different from cement which is a structural one.
 
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Old 12-14-15, 01:41 PM
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Oh, I didnt consider an inch or two to be thick, which is why I figured the thinset would be ok.

Ok, so assuming I wasnt going to cut out the concrete so that it is the same depth as the floor, what would be the best way to go?
 
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Old 12-14-15, 02:53 PM
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You want the floor to be solid where you have opened up the walls. Last thing you want is for the floor to crack underneath the flooring you are going to put in. A sturdy slab should be around 4" thick. Maybe the pictures you are going to upload will help tell the story.

I think the largest recommended trowel for thinset is 1/2" x 1/2" which would compress down to less than that once a tile is set. Here is some reading on different mortars.

https://www.tcnatile.com/faqs/71-thi...thick-bed.html
 
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Old 12-14-15, 04:39 PM
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You could also install a sheet vinyl like IVC, It can be loose laid and is very DIY friendly.
 
 

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