Filling gap along baseboard molding and floor...

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  #1  
Old 12-30-15, 04:00 PM
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Question Filling gap along baseboard molding and floor...

I am working on renovating a bedroom and we removed wood paneling that was placed over plaster. We stripped all the plaster from the walls and put up 1/4in drywall and re-installed the baseboard molding. There is now a gap between the baseboard molding (in some areas, as big as a 1in gap) and the floorboard -- see photo:

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Quarter rounds won't over the gap. I have a made-up solution, but I'm not sure it looks good and haven't fully installed it. I basically took a base cap and 3/4" quarter round and stacked them see photo:

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Does anyone have any other solutions to fix this? Does my solution look bad and unprofessional?

Thanks for any insight into this matter.
 
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Old 12-30-15, 04:10 PM
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Your solution does not look bad. I've seen similar.

Was the gap there before you removed the paneling? It seems that the floor has dip in it. That should've been fixed prior to the wall being built or re-built. Is the floor level?
 
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Old 12-30-15, 04:21 PM
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I'm with Norm; doesn't look bad. The only thing I would do differently, assuming you're not too far along, is use shoe moulding in place of the quarter round. It's a bit more subtle, in my opinion.
 
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Old 12-30-15, 04:22 PM
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Okay, that's relieving to hear my 'solution' it doesn't look terrible. I thought it would look decent once I paint it all white, but wasn't sure as this is my first dealing with flooring issues.

There was a smaller gap prior to removing paneling and plaster, not as big as it is now, however. Unfortunately, we didn't catch this or think about this being an issue until everything was up...The floor is level. Not sure if I understand your dip observation...are you referring to the plastic tarp on the ground that I'm pulling back?
 
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Old 12-30-15, 04:25 PM
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Thanks aka pedro.
Re: shoe moulding vs quarter round -- I agree but I couldn't find shoe moulding as thick as I could with the quarter round which was necessary for the gap to be covered.
 
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Old 12-30-15, 04:25 PM
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I don't think it looks bad either, but 1/4" sheet rock? To replace plaster and paneling? That's one reason for the huge gap. You should have shimmed the studs and used 1/2".
 
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Old 12-30-15, 04:41 PM
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Vic, I don't think he rebuilt the wall (no studs were moved or replaced). What do you mean shim the studs?

My remark was that I suspect the actual floor has shifted or sunken because of some reason. Are the gaps all around the room or just on one side and in the same area? Is there a basement below this wall? If so is there any chance that the support may have moved (maybe there is a jack stand under that wall). Did or does any of the walls have cracks in them? As it stands it a moot point since you seem to have the solution in hand. As you said a coat of paint and it will look good.
 
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Old 12-30-15, 05:28 PM
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Gotcha, Norm. The floor has not shifted nor sunken. It is up on the second floor and is a bedroom (living room is below). Also, the gaps are all around the room, just not 1in thick in every spot. No cracks in walls either.

Thanks for input and feedback!
 
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Old 12-30-15, 05:35 PM
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Deleted, Non-Benefitial, read the question wrong.
 

Last edited by czizzi; 12-31-15 at 04:25 AM.
  #10  
Old 12-30-15, 05:42 PM
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Well, I'm telling you everything that is going on, so there's that. Don't appreciate you insinuating I'm hiding something. Why on earth would I be hiding something and then ask the boards for help?

The house is 107 years old, and who knows how old the floor is but it certainly has some wear to it. Yes, we removed paneling and the plaster, which apparently made the walls much thicker than when drywall was installed. When we re-installed the baseboard moldings, there was a larger gap that was created.
 
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Old 12-30-15, 05:56 PM
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Deleted - Non-Beneficial - Read the question wrong.
 

Last edited by czizzi; 12-31-15 at 04:26 AM.
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Old 12-30-15, 08:07 PM
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something is messed up if you are getting one inch gaps under your baseboards
Czizzi, the gap isn't under the base... it's in front of the base- the front of the base is farther from the edge of the flooring because he removed all that plaster, lathe and paneling, moving the front of the base backwards.

Trickyur, there is no reason to get upset with the people who are trying to understand your problem and help. He clearly misunderstood your problem and sometimes pictures lack perspective. I can see the problem but the way optical illusions work, someone else might not. Cut him some slack.

Personally, I'd probably lay down a piece of 1/4" x 1" lattice, then put the 3/4" quarter round on top of that. In all truthfulness, it looks like you DO have flooring there... it's just not as clean and pretty as the rest of the floor. It probably hasn't seen the light of day in... 107 yrs or so. You could always hit it with a sander, some stain and poly.
 
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Old 12-30-15, 11:12 PM
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You guys aren't getting it. The gap is between the base mounted to the new sheetrock on the wall and the existing flooring. I'm no remodeler but if you take down walls that were probably at least an inch thick (paneling, plaster, maybe lath? ) and replace it with 1/4" sheetrock, you are going to have a gap between the re-installed baseboard and the original flooring that no shoe or 1/4 round is going to cover well.

1/4" sheetrock (drywall) should never be used on floors or ceilings over studs or joists alone. It will bow and flex like crazy. It's for making bends and curves or laminating over poor walls.

Norm, what I meant is that if 1/2" drywall wouldn't be thick enough to get out to the floor, he could have used 1/4" shim strips (or whatever) on the studs to bring it out enough.

Maybe I'm wrong, but that's the way I see it.
 
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Old 12-31-15, 03:08 AM
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I'd like to know more about the 1/4" drywall install. As noted above 1/4" isn't thick enough to be used by itself. It's main use is overlay or on rounded walls two layers will be used to make the 1/2" thickness. Mobile homes use it but they also have extra framing [1x2s] to support it. If you installed the 1/4" over wooden lath you might be ok.
 
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Old 12-31-15, 04:40 AM
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Well, I stand corrected on the issue, the picture and the stacked moldings made me think the gap was under the baseboards which obviously confused me. Thanks X for pointing that out.

If you have issues with the baseboards, how are you addressing the new gaps around the windows, doors, at the ceilings, and all electrical outlets and switches. Seems to me the problem would have been universal. I probably would have shimmed everything out or just removed the paneling and attached the 1/4" sheet rock to the plaster beneath. But hindsight is 20/20.

I have in the past built out a box at the bottom of a wall and attached base molding to it. I had to hide the main cable wires coming into a hotel that were directed straight through a hotel room and hid by ugly metal conduit that was installed about 1 ft below the ceiling, crossed the whole room and dropped 90 degrees and went through the floor. The box along the floor was much more palatable. Unless I told you that was what it was for, no one would ever know.
 
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Old 12-31-15, 07:09 AM
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Norm, what I meant is that if 1/2" drywall wouldn't be thick enough to get out to the floor, he could have used 1/4" shim strips (or whatever) on the studs to bring it out enough.
Now I see it.

Vic, I had to re-read your response twice. And yes you are correct. I was looking at the picture all wrong. What you say is absolutely correct.
 
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Old 12-31-15, 09:42 AM
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Thanks again for all the feedback. I appreciate it!

I reconfirmed with my friend who helped install the drywall and as it turns out we actually used 1/2" drywall. So that should eliminate the concern for the drywall to bow. Phew!

Another option would be to remove the base cap from my rigged 'solution' and only use the 3/4" quarter round. As you can see in the photo below, it doesn't cover the entire gap:

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Most likely another dumb question on my end, but is there a filler that can be used to fill the gap in this situation? Do they make thicker quarter rounds -- I can't seem to locate any at Home Depot or Lowes...

OR, should I just tear off all the mouldings, install new thicker base mouldings to hopefully cover this gap and then use a quarter round if the new mouldings don't cover?
 
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Old 12-31-15, 09:46 AM
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I would say go with you original idea and let it go. It looks good to us.
 
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Old 12-31-15, 09:57 AM
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The piece of lattice I mentioned is available at the box store. Its just a flat piece 1/4" thick, 1" wide. If you put it on the floor flat it would create a ledge for the 3/4" quarter round to sit on. The 1/4" step in front would look decent once its all caulked and painted.
 
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