Acclamtion and humidity control for engineered floor?

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Old 02-28-16, 06:26 AM
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Acclamtion and humidity control for engineered floor?

I am getting ready to install engineered wood floor and wondered about humidity and acclimation for the new floor. Right now no one is living in the home, we have not moved in yet. The temp is being maintained at about 66 degrees. When I go forward with installing the floor and then in a month the temp goes up to say 70 will I have a problem. I am planning on leaving a 1/4" gap all the way around the room.

What about humidity? what if the room is not humidity controlled? Thanks
 
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Old 02-28-16, 06:36 AM
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Not going to be an issue.
It is was that delicate there would be millions of failures.
Engineered flooring is very stable.
Have you opened up the packages and spread them out or sticked them for air flow between the boards.
As far as the gap, follow the company's install directions to the letter.
 
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Old 02-28-16, 01:34 PM
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The floor needs to come into harmony with the surrounding environment. If you could push it to closer to normal operating temperatures it would be optimal but a few degrees low shouldn't hurt. You did not mention if this is nail down or floating. On a slab or subfloor or any other pertinent information pertaining to the install like subfloor thickness and material make up.

72 hours for acclimation.
 
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Old 03-06-16, 10:33 AM
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Cleaning glue off while installing eng. floor

I am getting ready to install engineered wood floor. tongue and groove. if excess wood glue gets on surface what is best thing to clean it off with as I go. so it would still be wet. planning on using titebond glue or elmers wood glue.
 
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Old 03-06-16, 10:37 AM
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floating floor, gluing together, also planning on putting 6mil plastic for vapor barrier and then an underlayment between the plastic and the wood floor. floor is going on ceramic tile that is on a slab.
 
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Old 03-06-16, 10:55 AM
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Elmers wood glue is water based so a wet rag would be fine.
Titebond is a brand name for many glues. Cleanup should be listed in its instructions.
 
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Old 03-06-16, 11:23 AM
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Be sure to rinse the rag/sponge frequently so you are wiping up the excess glue and not smearing it around.
 
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Old 03-06-16, 12:32 PM
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No, use a glue designed for FLOORING. Go to the box store and in the flooring department they should have a glue for engineered flooring specific. Looks like elmers but it is not. Regular glue will not take the constant movement nor expansion and contraction of associated with flooring.

Roberts 1406 16 oz. Tongue and Groove Adhesive in Pint Applicator Bottle-1406-P - The Home Depot

You apply it to the bottom side of the groove and then pull the pieces together. Very little should get through to the surface. Have a damp rag handy at all times and simply wipe up. What are your plans for an underlayment? On a subfloor system or over concrete?
 

Last edited by czizzi; 03-06-16 at 12:46 PM. Reason: typo
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Old 03-06-16, 12:37 PM
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czizzi.... thanks for clarifying that.

I was thinking after I left my original reply that Elmers wood glue may set too hard.
 
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Old 03-06-16, 12:50 PM
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You have two threads going simultaneously on the same project. I have merged them together for continuity of others reading.

Check the installation instructions to see if you have to skim the tile to smooth out the base for the wood. The 6 mil poly may be redundant if the underlayment is a 3 in 1 as it serves as a vapor barrier itself. Duct tape the underlayment sections together.
 
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Old 03-06-16, 12:52 PM
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thanks for the great info. I will get that kind. as for underlayment, I am planning on 6mil plastic then the underlayment that lowes has that folds out. I was looking at something called pergo gold but that might be overkill so I was going to go with the next one down which also unfolds, (is not rolled). Lowes item number is tem #: 670313 | Model #: A61940

here is link. Shop FloorComfort 100-sq ft Premium 2mm Flooring Underlayment at Lowes.com

was going to use just the pergo gold but really want to make sure I have a good vapor barrier.
 
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Old 03-06-16, 01:04 PM
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Check my previous post as we crossed as I was merging the threads.

Your proposed floorcomfort underlayment states that it controls moisture, therefore it should qualify as an underlayment so eliminate the poly.

Send a link to the actual flooring so I can advise on the going over tile. But keep in mind, if the tile has any lippage or height differences between adjacent tiles, it will result in a less than solid floor when you put hardwood over it.
 
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Old 03-06-16, 01:26 PM
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I don't have link to what i have. I got it at a place in NC that has overruns & discontinued. I believe it is made by Shaw. Not positive
 
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Old 03-06-16, 01:38 PM
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H/D has a traffic aster underlayment that comes in a roll and is about 3mm thick & has vapor barrier. Item #1001-220-617
Would you have a preference between this and the pergo gold that Lowes has? Item #670312
 
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Old 03-06-16, 01:50 PM
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Look like they all supply vapor barrier protection, so vote with your pocket book as they all will work. Sounds like the 2 lowes flat varieties are boasting of sound isolation for rooms below. If that is a main selling point, you obviously don't need that you are on a slab.
 
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