Brand new engineered hardwood floors: lots of creaking

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  #1  
Old 03-16-16, 05:46 PM
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Brand new engineered hardwood floors: lots of creaking

I just paid a small fortune to have engineered hardwood flooring put in in our house. The house is a ranch style, one story with concrete slab.

The install is maybe 5 weeks old.In the kitchen there is major creaking and popping in certain spots. On those spots I can put my foot down and the wood rises slightly and falls under my weight, creating the loud creak/pop.

They used only glue to put the floor down.

This also is happening in the space between the hall and the master bedroom.

Is this normal? Should I have the installer come back and fix this? Thanks.
 
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  #2  
Old 03-16-16, 05:55 PM
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Some pics might help. Do you have the name of the manufacturer & the floor?
 
  #3  
Old 03-16-16, 06:34 PM
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No it's not normal.
How wide is this flooring?
Anyone check how flat the slab was before installing?
Did they leave any gaps on the outside edges and around the door opening for expantion and contraction?
No location in your profile so where going to have to guess on some issues.
Was there any moisture test done before the install?
Was the flooring left in the room with the boxes open and the flooring sticked for a few day?
 
  #4  
Old 03-17-16, 05:25 AM
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You didn't pay for a loose, creaky floor. Call your installer and ask him to look at it.
 
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Old 03-17-16, 07:14 AM
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I'm not an Engineer . . . . just a Real Estate Broker; but I've seen hundreds of houses with this type of floor covering.

Many of them have been severely buckled because the flooring doesn't have the same coefficient of expansion as the underlying material. Not knowing where you're located, I suspect that, in response to temperature changes, the concrete slab is contracting or expanding much more slowly than the flooring on your surface. Humidity also has negative effects; and those houses that have been subject to freezing have often had whole boards and sections pop right out of position.

Two things I know about engineered wood flooring are that Dogs Hate it . . . . because they can't get any traction; and Buyers have come to think of it as Paneling for the Floors . . . . instead of real wood. Not a good sign for the re-sale market !

I haven't seen a good solution implemented.
 
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Old 03-17-16, 08:06 AM
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Here is the first pic of the specs
2016-03-17_1100 - kage65's library

Here is a pic of the wood
2016-03-17_1101 - kage65's library

"Anyone check how flat the slab was before installing?
Did they leave any gaps on the outside edges and around the door opening for expantion and contraction?
No location in your profile so where going to have to guess on some issues.
Was there any moisture test done before the install?
Was the flooring left in the room with the boxes open and the flooring sticked for a few day?"

I don't know if they checked how flat the slab was before the install.
This is in Snellville, Ga
No moisture test prior, but this was done about 5 weeks ago and it was pretty cold during the install and not raining, so I can't imagine there was much moisture.
Flooring was not left in room with boxes open prior to install.

The floor is called Floor Score, it was installed by Xxxxxx Xxxxx.
Thank you.
 
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Last edited by czizzi; 03-17-16 at 02:54 PM. Reason: Remove installers Company Name
  #7  
Old 03-17-16, 08:18 AM
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Hi cwbuff,

I should say, its not really "loose" per say, you can barely see it moving under weight of my foot. Not like its rocking up and down. But it is very loud.
 
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Old 03-17-16, 08:22 AM
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hi Vermont,

I almost wish I had gotten laminate now. The only reason I got engineered wood is because I thought it would not creak and pop because it is glued down and its not floating.

The salesman told me that their laminate would not make any noise - but I did not believe him because in my last home I had laminate, and it creaked loudly in a lot of places.
 
  #9  
Old 03-17-16, 09:10 AM
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I wouldn't worry much about moisture or acclimating with an engineered floor.
Creaking is due to movement. If the floor was glued down there shouldn't be a lot of movement. Do you know if the installer rolled the floor? In any cast the installer should return and make it right.

I think Floor Score is a trade rating system and not a brand.
 
  #10  
Old 03-17-16, 11:57 AM
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Your installer has a policy of installing floors the day after the contract is signed. In my area they also have a less desirable reputation because of that policy. They obviously do NOT bring in the material and let it acclimate to the room temperature and humidity before installation, contrary to the requirements of the flooring manufacturer. They also will do minimal preparation of the sub-floor prior to installation. What you DO get is a brand new floor the very next day.

My sister had engineered hardwood installed in her house and while most of it went in without a hitch the living room was a different story. In her house there was a "dip" in the middle of the floor, about 3/4 of an inch over (as I recall) about a 20 foot span. The installer told me that while he could go ahead and install it it would not be a good install, that it would creak and pop whenever someone walked in that area with the dip and would eventually fail although he could not predict when it would fail. I asked if it needed self-leveling compound in the dip and his response was that yes, but not a regular SLC as it would crack at that thickness and that what it really needed was a special filler that was very expensive but that would be guaranteed. Well, it was another $1,000 for this special filler and labor but she has a SOLID floor that should last the rest of her life.

My opinion is that you also have irregularities in your floor that should have been corrected BEFORE the hardwood was installed. Even though you paid a premium (for next day service) for your installation I doubt that you will get your floor lifted and PROPERLY laid for free.
 
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Old 03-17-16, 12:45 PM
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I agree with acclimation with flooring, BUT, the flooring we installed a few weeks ago, although we did have in in the rooms for at least 72 hours, had a notice on the box "No acclimation needed". I find it difficult to believe that, but it was from the manufacturer. It was click lock engineered flooring.

In this instance, I feel the concrete and glue did not bond causing the rise in the flooring. I don't think there will be much that can be done aside from removing the flooring.
 
  #12  
Old 03-17-16, 01:12 PM
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My understanding is that engineered hardwood flooring is a glue up of cross grain hardwood layers. One of the benefits is that like plywood it is less susceptible to temperature variations.

This statement is from Mannington's installation guidance for their hardwood floors. It is typical of several other manufacturers -

While considered a best practice, Mannington engineered Wood flooring products do not need to be acclimated to the job site unless the flooring will be transported from one extreme temperature or humidity into another.
 
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Old 03-17-16, 01:59 PM
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My opinion is that you also have irregularities in your floor that should have been corrected BEFORE the hardwood was installed.
I agree with Furd's quote above and that the installers didn't have time to prepare the floor properly.
This isn't a race and it takes time to do a quality job. I don't believe it has anything to do with acclimation.

If the vendor promised 100% satisfaction, I'd take them up on it and get it fixed. If you have to push them, many national companies will replace a product regardless of what it costs them.
They want to avoid court and bad publicity.
 
  #14  
Old 03-17-16, 03:04 PM
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After 5 weeks I doubt there is anything your can do as the glue is already set. However, you can put some heavy weights on that area and see if weighting in down helps it make a bond. There is obviously a slab irregularity or moisture issue that has caused the bond with the glue to fail.
 
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