Which underlayment pad is best for my flooring?

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Old 04-06-16, 01:49 PM
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Which underlayment pad is best for my flooring?

I am going to lay some Armstrong Grand Illusions laminate in a master bedroom and a guest bedroom. The subfloor is plywood and both bedrooms are on the upper floor of the house with trusses between the floors. Armstrong recommends either the Armstrong quiet comfort underlayment ($32.99 per 100 ft2 roll) or the Armstrong quiet comfort premium underlayment ($64.99 per roll). I can't find any particular specification that directs me to one or the other. What do you suggest?
 
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Old 04-06-16, 01:52 PM
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The premium will be a little more lofty and will give the floor more of a squishy fee, IMO. If they recommend either, I think the regular at $32.99 would be adequate.
 
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Old 04-06-16, 02:01 PM
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As for laminate, thicker is not always better. Excess movement in the click lock mechanism can cause issues down the road. A basic underlayment is fine in your case. The more expensive ones are to be considered when you are on a slab and moisture barrier protection is needed. The pad is there to give the floor less of a clacky feeling when walked on.
 
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Old 04-09-16, 08:56 AM
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Thanks for the advice. I have ordered the flooring and pad. Now, I would like some advice on the doorway transition.Name:  IMG_0565.jpg
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Size:  20.7 KB We are adding more laminate flooring, but it is not exactly the same as the original is out of business. It is very, very, very close. I would like to actually do without the "T" mold transition, but it may be necessary. Can I run the new floor the same direction as the floor in the hall? It would make the closet look better I think. I will be flooring the closet. Can I attach the new to the old with glue if I don't use the "T"? Do I start the new at the doorway, or in the far left wall? Do I need a pull bar? I have laid laminate in two other rooms, one on the diagonal but I didn't have to meet an existing wood floor.
 
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Old 04-09-16, 10:37 AM
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You will most likely have a cut edge where the existing laminate ends so you will have to use t molding.

Flooring is traditionally set perpendicular to the floor joists system to prevent possible waves in the floor where there is deflection between the floor joists.
 
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