Laminate layout in an oddly-shaped basement

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Old 04-24-16, 12:21 PM
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Laminate layout in an oddly-shaped basement

Hi folks,
I am doing floating flooring and have the following layout in the basement, all rooms totaling ~1000sq ft.
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Overall I would like all planks laying parallel to wall 2. My plan was to begin with the wall 2 and go toward the office. Not quite sure what to do about wall 3. It's not long enough to be the starting wall. Going from 2 to 3, in the opposite direction, I am estimating 7-8 rows - that's quite a lot. Is this doable? Is there a special technique for laying laminate in the opposite direction?

Also, the manual states that I need to remove tongue for all row 1 planks, which only adds to the confusion.

Any advice?
 
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Old 04-24-16, 01:30 PM
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Welcome to the forums! Start with wall 3 and work your way to the opening provided by wall 2. When you get there you will make sure the section you just laid will be parallel to wall 2 and continue laying. If you have to correct the lay of the small vestibule, you can do so since it is floating. You can't very easily back lay laminate as you can with hardwoods. If any run is over 40', you will find that the manufacturer will call for an expansion joint provided by a transition strip. You didn't give measurements, so we can't tell.

I would run a transition strip at the office entrance and continue with that as a separate room layout starting at the same wall and direction. In each closet, you will have one or two pieces to back lay, but you can do that on the fly as you do each closet by laying the wings and drawing them together with the main run across the closet.


Questions to answer for yourself. Have you done a moisture test on the concrete? Are you using a manufacturer's approved underlayment. Is the laminate approved for basement or below grade installation?
 
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Old 04-24-16, 01:32 PM
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I know it is not your question, but laminate in a basement is generally not a good idea. Moisture and laminate don't play well together. I see a sump, so moisture is a probable issue which will severely shorten the life of your flooring. A better idea would be a floating luxury vinyl floor which would not be subject to a moisture issue and you could lift and get a fan underneath should you need to. Have you performed a moisture test yet?
 
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Old 04-24-16, 02:53 PM
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Have you done a moisture test on the concrete?
Are you using a manufacturer's approved underlayment.
Is the laminate approved for basement or below grade installation?

Yes to all of the above. I do have a sump pump box but the sump pump itself has been unplugged for many years and the basement has been issue free (knock on the wood).

My main question was regarding the layout, and yes I will begin at wall 3.

Manufacturer recommends removing the tongue for row 1. I've watched countless online videos and no one does it. Is this a must do step?
 
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Old 04-24-16, 04:51 PM
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Removing the starting tongue minimizes the chance that the molding along that side will not cover the edge of the laminate since you must leave a gap at all walls and that gap means from the end of the tongue, not the end of the finished surface. If you leave the tongue on it's very possible the molding will not be wide enough to cover the gap as the floor expands and contracts with temperature.

I agree with chandler about starting at wall three, but suggest you take some measurements so you will end up with a joint right where you need it to pick up wall two. In other words, you may have to rip the piece(s) against wall 3 so you have a full piece ending right in line with wall 2 (plus the gap).

While you are at it, measure carefully all across the room to the closets to make sure you don't end up with little skinny pieces at that side. You may have to rip the pieces against wall two to avoid that, which would require additional adjustment to pieces against wall 3.

Transition strips at the door of all the closets would make life easier for you too.
 
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Old 04-24-16, 08:29 PM
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Thank you. Very helpful.
I already started at 3... and running a test layout without hammering the sides .. planning to run it all the way to the closets. Once I reach the doors of the closets:
-- I will be able to properly alight 1st row (both walls 2&3 are wavy)
-- Decide whether rip at wall 3 or 2 (or both)

Thanks to all for your help. I am much more comfortable now. This will be a time consuming project for me but I am now confident I can do it right.
 
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