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Leak onto engineered wood caused cupping. Being told to replace ENTIRE FLOOR.

Leak onto engineered wood caused cupping. Being told to replace ENTIRE FLOOR.


  #1  
Old 04-27-16, 05:56 AM
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Leak onto engineered wood caused cupping. Being told to replace ENTIRE FLOOR.

Hi guys, I am really in need of some expert advice!

I am staying at one of my parents properties while in university. About 6 months ago there was a leak in the bathroom that got into the hallway. There was bulging and my neighbor removed two planks and the bulging went down.

However, it seems that the water may have spread on the sub floor (terrazzo) and caused a bit of cupping in other areas of the house. The cupping is no more than a few milimeters and relegated to only a few patches in the house.

I read that perhaps a dehumidifier could help with the issue, and worst case resanding the floor. However, I had a guy come to look at the floor and he said the whole floor would have to be redone and to "forget about the dehumidifier or sanding, that was a lost cause." He quoted me 12k.

Honestly, I think he is trying to take advantage of a young girl who doesn't know anything about flooring. What he is saying is not jiving with what I have read online. He didn't even take a moisture content reading.

Could you guys weigh in? Full disclosure, my parents still don't know about the leak and I am kind of freaking out. I would like to fix it before they find out : /

For what it is worth, I live in VERY HUMID south florida, and I am sure that is not helping the problem.

I am attaching some pictures. The pics with the pencil are the absolutely most raised areas in the house. The rest of the house is not cupped, and if it is, it is very minimal.

Also, what do I do about the missing boards? We have extra ones, but I have no idea how to put one in : /

I would really appreciate all the help I can get, feeling very upset about it

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Last edited by Heather1997; 04-27-16 at 08:52 AM.
  #2  
Old 04-27-16, 06:59 AM
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Much depends on your flooring. Some have a veneer on top so thin that sanding is not an option especially if the plank is warped or cupped. Others have a thicker layer of "pretty" wood on top and can be sanded but again it depends on the thickness of the wood and how much needs to be removed to get rid of the cupping. In general I tend to think of replacing engineered flooring if it's been water damaged and cupped. I would consider sanding if it were still down solid and flat and only the finish on top had wear damage.
 
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Old 04-27-16, 08:58 AM
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I just checked the box with the extra planks and I think I was mistaken. It is not engineered wood, it is Brazilian Redwood.

Thank you for your reply, although it comes bearing bad news. So nothing can be done with a dehumidifier?
 
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Old 04-27-16, 09:13 AM
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Solid wood flooring can withstand a lot more sanding than engineered but before any sanding/finishing is done you need to make sure the floor has dried! It's fairly easy to replace individual boards. You cut the bottom half of the groove off so you can insert the tongue and then tap down the side with the groove.

Do you know what the air humidity is in your house? and the flooring? A dehumidifier always helps in fla!
 
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Old 04-27-16, 10:01 AM
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Thats good to hear, thank you! The humidity in the house now is 35%, that is with the AC running for most of the day.

As far as dehumidifiers are concerned, should I just get a basic one to run all day or rent a big industrial one for a couple of days?

I REALLY hope that the cupping can go down by drying out the floor
 
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Old 04-27-16, 11:24 AM
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I hate to deliver bad news. There's no hope for that floor. You cannot sand it, and it will never lay flat again.

The exception is the 3rd picture. It looks like real oak planks. That is repairable if it is solid oak floors like from old houses.
 
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Old 04-27-16, 11:28 AM
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Your AC is doing all you need for dehumidification, 35% is low for FL and should be sufficient to dry anything that is still moist. Remember, if you sand you or someone will need to match the color and finish, not an easy job.

I would start (continue) with getting a few more professional opinions and prices.

The step you missed wan to have the insurance company take care of the repair, minus a deductible if needed. Not sure if they could be called at this point.

Bud
 
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Old 04-27-16, 01:26 PM
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Hi, I was mistaken. The entire floor is Brazilian Redwood. The worst of the cupping is only in some areas, the rest of the floor is either totally flat or only slightly cupped. Really no hope???

I better head to the learn to dig your own grave section of this forum bc my parents are going to KILL ME.
 
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Old 04-27-16, 01:32 PM
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Since the floor is "real" wood and not engineered I think it can be saved. The question is whether or not it's worth it. It will take heavy sanding to take the unevenness out and the entire floor will have to be done, not just the damaged section. How many square feet of wood flooring is there? It may be cheaper and easier to rip it out and replace.
 
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Old 04-27-16, 02:49 PM
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Heather,

I think there is a bit of confusion about exactly what type of flooring you have. There are 3 most common hardwood floors.

Laminate - sometimes confused with "engineered" flooring. It comes in various thickness but is not a "real" wood floor. Some laminates can be very susceptible to moisture.

Engineered wood - typically 3/4" thick "real" wood with an engineered finish on top. Usually not sandable but individual boards can be replaced.

Hardwood flooring - usually strips that are pure wood 3/4" thick. The can be sanded and refinished. They are also not as susceptible to water damage.

Can you determine for certain what type of floor you have? In any case, I would get other floor guys to look at it. The 1st guy might just be looking to make a few bucks.

If it helps, when my daughter was an undergrad she shared an apartment with a friend. They had a party and when it was over there was a couple of thousand dollars of damage to the apartment. Some drunk dirtbag spray painted graffiti all over the kitchen and baths. Like most college kids she probably had $20 in her bank account. She called me and her mom and I paid for the repairs.
We didn't kill her although she knew we weren't happy. Stuff happens and your parents will know that. Tell them that someday you will pay them back with grandkids.
 
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Old 04-27-16, 03:28 PM
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CW offered some consolation and I will do the same. I have high quality laminate/engineered in my kitchen and I like it. It's not solid wood.
I knew when I installed it that it would need replaced in the event of a flood. I'm OK with that and hopefully the parents will feel the same. They also have the benefit of writing it off.
 
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Old 04-27-16, 05:34 PM
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For some reason I thought it was engineered, but checking the box with the extras now it says it is Brazilian Redwood. So I was mistaken. I am having someone else come and take a look. He says it is actually not an issue of water damage but not enough space put it when it was installed. Who knows. I am NEVER getting wood floors when I buy a house.

That is horrible about the guy at the party! What a loser.
 
 

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