Replacing a Laminate Floor

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  #1  
Old 04-30-16, 08:18 AM
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Replacing a Laminate Floor

Hi, I am replacing a laminate floor. The old floor has a pad underneath, no pad on the boards. The flooring that's going in has pad on the boards. What are the good things about leaving the pad down under the floor, so it would be double padded? What are the bad things that would make me pull up the pad?

Thanks - Dave
 
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Old 04-30-16, 09:11 AM
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I'm not the flooring pro but have installed floors in my own home. I would remove the existing pad.
I think 2 pads might be a little spongy. Also the more flex the laminate has, the better chance of the locking seams separating.
 
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Old 04-30-16, 10:21 AM
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Agree with Brian. Double pad would make the surface a little quieter perhaps, but you run the risk of the snap lock separating if the joints can flex too much. You could review the install instructions for the new laminate and see if they allow additional pad and what type.
 
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Old 04-30-16, 11:47 AM
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OK, Guys, thanks. We bought the flooring at Lowe's, it it Allen and Roth brand. I called and talked with someone in the flooring department. I was told that people do it all the time. There is nothing in the install instructions about two pads, only to install pad for floor boards without pad already attached.

The original flooring under the pad is not too great, and the guys who installed the last floor had to build up a couple of places with pad.

Obviously I don't want the joints to separate. It's my first floor, and a little hesitant.

Dave
 
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Old 04-30-16, 03:22 PM
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You always default to the manufactures recommended install method. As the pad is already attached, then that is the way to go. With laminate, more pad is not better. Too much flex will tax the click lock mechanism and bring failure down the road. Deal with the areas that are not flat separate from the rest of the floor. The pad really just helps with sound deadening and has nothing to do with insulation or softness of the final floor.
 
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Old 04-30-16, 04:04 PM
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Thanks, Guys. I am now hoping that I'm not doing something incorrect because everyone tells you "listen for the click". I am not hearing any click, so I hope it's just some sort of metaphor, haha.
 
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Old 05-01-16, 04:29 AM
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There is no click that I have ever heard. You just need to make sure that the tongue fully engages the groove along the entire length of each board and that they lay completely flat on the ground. If it wants to resist laying down or gives you some minor resistance, you are not fully engaged or there is some crud in the groove.
 
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Old 05-01-16, 04:50 AM
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Czizzi is correct. Always go with manufacturers recommendations. Most store clerks are not installers or even knowledgeable about the products they sell, especially the big box stores. If in doubt call the manufacture directly.
 
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