Tools needed to install a hardwood floor.


  #41  
Old 09-01-16, 02:22 PM
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Absolutely leave the gas work to a pro.....gas can be deadly. You've got a lot of projects on your plate....prioritize them....Rome wasn't built in a day. If you have too many DIY projects in process at the same time none will get done and it will get overwhelming. Just my 2 cents
 
  #42  
Old 09-01-16, 02:58 PM
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JIMMIEM,

You're right, that was why we ended up calling the plumber to begin with. I originally gave it a shot and when I realized I couldn't hook the soft copper up to the CSST and needed to replace it all, I thought we'd get a quote or two. We'll leave the plumbing stuff up to the pro's. We've also called another place to get another quote. Perhaps BC Plumbing can do the AC / furnace cheaper but charge more for the gas lines. Perhaps Corning Appliance Corporation can do the gas lines cheaper but charge more for the AC / furnace. If so, maybe we'll mix it up a bit. Have one company do one thing, another company do another.
 
  #43  
Old 09-01-16, 03:12 PM
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With multiple quotes you may be able to get one of them to sweeten the deal or throw in some extras. If one is a company you would do regular business with let them know that you're looking to become a regular long term customer.
 
  #44  
Old 09-01-16, 03:37 PM
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You can haggle with companies just like with pawn shops? I would have never of thought of that! We're already renting a hot water tank from Corning Appliance. What's weird is our neighbor that we met last night for the first time, he works for Corning Appliance and he installed the hot water tank. He highly suggested we buy one and not rent one from his company. But he also was the one who suggested we get the free quote from his company for plumbing work we need done. We called them, just waiting for a return call.

I'll give the haggling a shot when I get an official quote from BC if someone else is cheaper. I'll say, well, Corning Appliance can do the CSST for the same price you're doing the black pipe for. I think we're going to let them install that there. Maybe they'd lower their price or something for us or match it. I like BC because of how wonderful a job they do. I mean, it's great! When they replaced my dad's electrical panel, they made it look very professional. Ran the wires all nice look so it looks real good and you can tell it was done by a pro. They're just pricey. Thanks for all the advice guys! I'll keep ya posted.
 
  #45  
Old 09-01-16, 04:35 PM
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Everything is negotiable. Your dad is a customer? Some places will give you something for referring a new customer to them. Lots of competition out there. But, if you have a company you're happy with it may be worth it to pay a little more for the peace of mind.
 
  #46  
Old 09-02-16, 03:24 AM
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Nothing wrong with haggling with the contractors to get a lower price or have more included in the job but you don't want to get too aggressive, some will comply, some will refuse and a few will lower the price to get the job but then cut corners to make up the difference.
 
  #47  
Old 09-02-16, 06:44 PM
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I think I found a better company. Corning Appliance. Our new neighbor works for them and highly suggested we get a free quote. They're coming Tuesday. The guy I talked to at Corning Appliance seemed really nice. He said they're not the cheapest around but everything will be up to code and they treat every house as if it was their own. He said it'd be very professional and they want our business. If we need something down the road, they want to make sure we go back to them. He asked if I got the quote from BC yet. I said no because I hadn't gotten it, but even if I did, I'd probably would have said no (I learned that lesson a while back).

Ray, at Corning Appliance, said they'd do their best to quote us a low price but when BC's quote comes in, if it's cheaper, let them know. He said he has some wiggle room and can take it to his manager and they might be able to beat it. We was thinking maybe the reason BC said the CSST was 5$ - 6$ a foot, just to buy, not install, and pushed really hard for black iron was maybe because black iron takes longer to install. Do you guys think that black iron is better than CSST?

One last thing, I'm getting ready to purchase the tools for the flooring job. I was thinking of getting one of those framing nailers for the plywood but then I remembered how I'm supposed to use screws instead of nails.
 
  #48  
Old 09-03-16, 04:51 AM
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The plumbing gas line question is a good question for the plumbing forum guys. For the subfloor there are screw guns that have a long barrel which allow you to stand while installing the screws......fairly pricey and a one trick pony....maybe rent one. If you don't mind working on your hands and knees a drill/impact driver would work and be useful for other projects.
 
  #49  
Old 09-03-16, 08:54 AM
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I don't mind working on my hands and knees. It's a small room, 11 foot by 12 foot. I'm planning on buying the plywood and the tools today. I have 1,000$ set aside for this project and it might not be enough. But my dad has some tools I can borrow.

Minus the hardwood flooring, what should I be getting today at lowes? So far, I have this on my list:

Shop Plytanium 23/32 CAT PS1-09 Tongue and Groove Pine Plywood Subfloor, Application as 4 x 8 at Lowes.com (how many sheets though?)

Shop Bostitch Staples Flooring Pneumatic Nailer at Lowes.com

Shop Bostitch Roundhead Finishing Pneumatic Nailer at Lowes.com


Then I'll need some screws. Not sure which ones to get yet. My dad used those star screws, the ones that take the hex bits or whatever they are. I don't really like those but if they're better, I can use them. Not sure what length to get. Still gotta read the book and links that people suggested. That might give me some insight.

To cut the plywood, I was going to borrow my father's circular saw. My wife says she knows a trick on how to cut a straight line with one using a 2x4 and some clamps or something. My dad's got drills and I got a drill. I was thinking I put a screw driver bit on the end of it. He used to have this drill that was made for screws. It had the long barrel. He's got dementia now and he's been doing real weird stuff, like putting his tools in a file cabinet, etc. It might be very hard finding it, if he still has it. I think that's the one you were talking about JIMMIEM.

I was hoping it had a setting on it, so I could set the depth, you know? Then, no matter how long I held the trigger down for, it'd set the screws down to the same depth each time. I can't remember if it has that or not.

I'll also be borrowing a pry bar and a claw hammer. We got a tape measure but I'll probably borrow a square (not sure that's the right name, it's what we call it. It's a big metal L) and then a level, although I might not need it. Trying to think if there's anything else I might need or not....
 
  #50  
Old 09-03-16, 10:13 AM
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Get some knee pads. Construction adhesive for the subfloors. If you find the stand-up screw gun you'll have to find out what type of screws it uses. SPAX screws work well for attaching the plywood subfloor.....I know HD has them, not sure if Lowe's does. Sorry to hear about your father's dementia. Follow the subfloor installation guidelines concerning joint staggering and abutting. Butt joints require gaps to prevent squeaks caused by rubbing. Kudos to your wife.
Also, hardwood flooring and the subfloor will require acclimation to your house in order to ensure that their moisture contents are within acceptable limits....might want to add a moisture meter to you list of things to buy.
$1000 might be tight....you'll need to buy in the vicinity of 150 square feet for the room....this will allow for waste, etc. The flooring usually comes in boxes containing 20 square feet. Depending on what species and brand you buy you won't have a lot left over for tools and supplies e.g. subfloor screws, hardwood flooring cleats. Did you say you had a miter saw?
 
  #51  
Old 09-03-16, 11:21 AM
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Is this the correct construction adhesive for the subfloors?

Shop LIQUID NAILS Subfloor & Deck Interior/Exterior Construction Adhesive at Lowes.com

I'm probably going to purchase two of those saw horses. The electronic screwdriver gun might not be the right one. I'm looking at it and it's made by Porter Cable. It says Porter Cable Electronic Model: 659 HD Drywall Driver. I found this e-bay link that shows a picture of it:

Porter Cable Electronic Heavy Duty Drywall Driver Model 659 | eBay

Would that work? I can switch the heads out for whatever type I want. I got a whole bunch of screwdriver heads that would work. I got a few extra long ones and looking at it, I might need to use the extra long bits.


Also, I found a bunch of SPAX screws on Home Depot's website. Would these be the ones I'd want to purchase?

SPAX #8 x 1-1/2 in. Philips Square Drive Flat-Head Full Thread Yellow Zinc Coated Multi Material Screw (197 per Box)-4101020400406 - The Home Depot

Today, I'll probably buy everything I need for the subfloor and then tear up the old carpet and old subfloor. I'll let the plywood get acclimated for a few days in the room and then start on cutting and installing it. That'll give me time to read the book and link.

Not sure what hardwood flooring cleats are but I'll read up on that as well. We do have a compound miter saw. It's a cheaper one made by ProjectPro. It's 8 1/4" and the model is 92101.

Is there anything else you can think of that I'll need at Lowes or Home Depot? I just want to make sure I got the right screws coming and everything. I was thinking of this pinless moisture meter from Lowes. They say it's good for finished work, hardwood, softwood, masonry, etc:

Shop General Tools & Instruments Pinless Moisture Meter at Lowes.com

I was thinking 6 sheets of the 23/32 4 x 8 foot plywood. What do you think?

For my father's dementia, it's alcohol related dementia. The doctors I've talked to have said chances are good that if he stops drinking, his dementia won't get worse. It won't get better, but at least it won't get worse. My mum drinks heavily as well and now she has something called Chronic Kidney Disease Stage 3B. It's from a lifetime of untreated high blood pressure. The doc says every drink she has increased her blood pressure and if she doesn't stop, she'll die as well. It's very hard watching them drink but there's not much I can do to stop them at this point. At stage 4, my mum will need to be put on dialysis.
 
  #52  
Old 09-03-16, 12:56 PM
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Crude Drawing.

I took measurements the best I could with a tape measurer and here's a crude drawing I created in paint brush. I know it's not the best, but it gives you guys an idea of how the baby's room looks. There's no closet in this room.Name:  Diagram 1 (floor).jpg
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I figure if I buy 6 sheets of plywood, that'd be more than enough and I could save what I don't use for later. Still not sure on the screws to get yet though but because the wood has to acclimate, I can go to Lowes and buy the tools and supplies now and wait to hear back on the glue and screws that I need. I'll purchase the moisture meter as well.
 
  #53  
Old 09-03-16, 12:57 PM
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If you can find the correct screws for the Porter Cable.....you don't want to use drywall screws.
Use at least 2 inch screws for the plywood floor. There are also screws specifically for decking....if you can find them....may be cheaper than SPAX.
PL Premium Adhesive is good for the subfloor to joist joint, but what you have listed will work as long as it's for subfloors.
The miter saw you have will be fine....don't need anything fancy....the cuts that you will be doing will wind up hidden under baseboards, door casing, etc.
Do a sketch of the room and joist locations to determine the correct number of sheets of plywood. Don't want any plywood joints that aren't on a joist.
Pinless moisture meter will work but pin type are supposed to be more accurate. The pinless will at least get you in the ballpark.
Sorry to hear about your mother. You've got your hands full....hope you have some family around to help out.
It's your $ but there may be less expensive flooring tool options that will work just fine. Have you decided on your hardwood flooring yet? Once you get it then buy the tools that you will need to install it. You may change your mind about things as you get into the project.
Flooring cleats are the 'nails' that are driven with the flooring nailer. The cleats have a little head....kind of L shaped.
 
  #54  
Old 09-03-16, 01:11 PM
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If you are not taking the subfloor down to the joists, you do not need adhesive for a second layer. I use deck screws made by Senco - they are collated for use in a crew gun, but the collated part also makes it easy to hand drive as it holds he screw for you until it bites in the floorng. The are found in buckets in the screw department. They take a #2 square head bit.
 
  #55  
Old 09-03-16, 02:56 PM
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I figured out what the cleats were when I was down at Lowes. I almost bought the staples but when I saw the cleats I was thinking maybe I should hold off. I got the Bostitch Flooring Nailer that I linked too. Not sure which cleats to get now because there's a lot of different gauges and sizes. My wife works next door to Lowes, so she can pick them up on Monday (or maybe Tuesday) after we determine which ones to get.

I don't think screws will be a problem for the Porter Cable because I can just put on a different bit for the different types, unless I'm missing something here. Should I use 2" or do you think go a little longer? We're going to place an order for samples of the hardwood on Monday. I'll try placing it today but I got a feeling they're closed. The samples cost money but if we order the wood through the company, they'll refund us for the samples they said.

I didn't get the plywood yet. They want 68$ to deliver it. I figure I'll just borrow my brother's truck and pick them up myself.
 
  #56  
Old 09-03-16, 03:08 PM
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Currently, all there is on the floor is a carpet, a carpet pad, the old hardwood floor and then the joists. So I'm definitely taking it down to the joists. I haven't had a chance to fully read the book yet but I'll be doing that once I get the old floor out of there. What do you mean the second layer? I thought the game plan was to tear up the old floor until I got to the joists, lay down 23/32 thick T&G plywood (after it acclimates), put down a vapor barrier and then on top of that, put down the hardwood floor.

On page 44 of the book by Charles Peterson, I see them talking about beefing up a bouncy floor and they mention an underlayment. From the picture, it looks like this goes above the plywood but before the vapor retarder. Am I going to need one of those underlayments? I haven't come across what I'm supposed to use as an underlayment yet. Gonna go rip up the old carpet and old floor now though and I'll be back later. Wish me luck!
 
  #57  
Old 09-03-16, 03:51 PM
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2" screws for the plywood will be fine...longer won't be a problem is you're so inclined. Get the 2" flooring cleats. I believe the other poster thought there was a subfloor under the floor that is under the carpet and that you were adding a (second) layer of plywood over that. A 3/4" plywood subfloor on the joists should be sufficient. Additional underlayments are used to beef up a bouncy subfloor. If the floor is not bouncy now then you should be ok. What size are the joists and what is their spacing?
 
  #58  
Old 09-03-16, 05:07 PM
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Not sure what size the joists are because I haven't reached them yet. I had to take my brother home. I was babysitting him while my parents went to my sister's wedding. We got the carpet out and the carpet pad. There was something weird and thin under the carpet pad. It wasn't over the whole floor. It was very thin and broke easy like. It was kinda hard and had these fiber things in it, kinda like that press board, but the fibers were real sharp.

I'm so glad I took all of that out! The carpet smelled soooo freaking bad of cat / dog pee. There were urine stains all over it. Even the carpet padding and that weird thin thing smelled soooo horrible and was real sticky! We washed our hands after removing each layer. We're down to the old hardwood now.

It looks like where the doorway is, the old hardwood might actually run out into the hallway. I hope that's not the case, but if it is, what do I do? Use the jig saw to cut it at the doorway or remove the sticky tiles for that section in the hallway and when I get the new hardwood, tear up those pieces and lay it down in the room and when I reach the doorway, continue out into the hallway? I'll try showing pictures once I get it torn up a bit more.

Are these the cleats I need? It doesn't show the gauge and doesn't list my Bostitch flooring nailer as one of the tools it fits.

Shop Bostitch 1000-Count 2-in Flooring Pneumatic Nails at Lowes.com

I know my flooring nailer says it takes:
[code]
16-gauge "L" shape cleat nails from 1-1/2-in to 2-in lengh
[/code]
 
  #59  
Old 09-03-16, 05:31 PM
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My wife, who knows a lot more about this stuff than I do, also had me buy these things called squares. They're triangle though but she said she'll show me what they're used for and how to use them when it comes time. Then she had me buy this new blade for the circular saw. It's a 140T Irwin Marathon 7 1/4" blade that says it's for plywood, OSB, veneer and plastic. We're probably going to need another blade for the hardwood, right?

Do these look like the right screws?

SPAX #10 x 2 in. Philips Square Drive Flat-Head Full Thread Zinc Coated Multi-Material Screw (105 per Box)-4101010500506 - The Home Depot

I wonder how many boxes I should get of the cleats and the screws.

So currently, I might not need the adhesive, is that correct? That should save us some money...
 
  #60  
Old 09-03-16, 05:44 PM
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Here's the weird drywall / floor stuff. In our old house, there was a gap between the flooring and the drywall. It's almost as if the floor in this bedroom isn't level. The wall that has the yard on the other side has a bit of a gap, but the other walls don't. And the floor looks like it goes straight into the other rooms. Almost as if they ran the floors and then built the walls. Not 100% sure how to proceed tearing it up. I'm probably going to start where there's a hole in the floor and go from there. Not sure if I should take a sheet rock knife and cut a 1/2 from the floor upwards into the drywall, to give that spacing that's normally there or not. What do you think?

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Last edited by Spork Schivago; 09-03-16 at 05:45 PM. Reason: added spaces between pictures to make them easier to see
  #61  
Old 09-03-16, 05:50 PM
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You will need the adhesive. Those are the correct Bostich cleats. #8 screws would have been fine. You'll have to stop the new plywood subfloor on a joist. Will the flooring run perpendicular or parallel to the door? This will determine how far to go with the new subfloor for now. You don't really need a blade with that many teeth. The more teeth the smoother the cut. You don't need a real smooth cut for the subfloor. When you cut the hardwood floor boards to length that would be done on the miter saw. If/when do have to do a lengthwise rip cut on a hardwood floor board you can use a table saw, circular saw, or jig saw. Rip blades for the table saw or circular saw are usually 24 tooth blades.
 
  #62  
Old 09-03-16, 06:00 PM
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An oscillating multi tool would be best for this. Lay a 3/4" thick board against the drywall and cut away the drywall. You'll then be able to see what the wall studs are set on. This drywall gap will eventually be covered by baseboard. Depending on what you find will determine how to go about working on the existing flooring. Can you take a picture for the basement and show us what the joists and bottom of the existing floor looks like.
 
  #63  
Old 09-03-16, 06:21 PM
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So, I got the first few boards out. When you walk into the room, I started with the far left corner. The one where the wall is against the outside and the other wall is against the master bedroom. The old hardwood definitely runs before the drywall. And what's where, in the very corner, there was what appears to be a 2 x 4 nailed to the subfloor behind the sheetrock. I got it out, but I don't think that's right. Wondering if I should take down the drywall. So, now there's a 2 x 4 that isn't anchored to anything. This was the furthest left corner of the room. Any ideas what that might have been and why it was done that way?
 
  #64  
Old 09-03-16, 07:25 PM
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Stop pulling flooring out.....if it's a load bearing wall you're going to be in trouble. When a house is built a subfloor is laid on the joists and a finished floor or carpeting laid on top of that. From what you are describing the flooring that you have served as the subfloor and finished floor. Years ago the finished floor was laid directly on the joists and this appears to be what you have. Don't start taking down walls. Does all your flooring run perpendicular to the joists?
 
  #65  
Old 09-03-16, 07:57 PM
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JIMMIEM, I didn't get your message on time, I took more out, but only that one was like that. It's a bit odd, because in that area, there's actually new wood. Not sure how it got there. I don't think that two by four is very tall, the one that had the nail in it. It's as if they nailed from the top of the 2 x 4 down. That's the only one like that though. Here's some more pictures of what you asked for.

So far, all the flooring runs the opposite way of the joists. The joists run this way | | | and the flooring runs this way: - - -


This first picture here, this is where the hardwood continues into the hallway. One of the load bearing walls is on our stairway. When you walk into the baby to be's bedroom, that would be the wall on the right. The one where I started ripping the floor boards out after I realized I was going the wrong way.
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This second picture here shows the 2 x 4 that had a nail through it. This seems to be the only one like this.
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We're pretty good with the drywall stuff, I got a good bit of experience with that. So, if I have to cut a piece out where that 2x4 was and see what's back there, I can easily put it back in when I'm done. We brought joint compound from the old place with us and all our drywall tools, so it shouldn't take too long. I mean, minus the time for the mud to dry and stuff.

What do you suggest I do at this point? I'll hold off an anymore work until I hear back from you. I don't want to break the house!
 
  #66  
Old 09-03-16, 08:02 PM
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So, when you walk into the bedroom, the floor joists run right to left (or left to right) so far. And then the flooring runs forwards to backwards... Jess was thinking we could try to cut the floor boards somehow by the drywall if it ran too far into the hallway. But from what you're saying, something's wrong here, right? Can we not do what we want to do? Somehow, it appears the master bedroom had new hardwood put in a while back. In the closet, if we pull up a loose piece, we can see they put it over the old hardwood. It's poorly done though and not very level. It's wavy too, like this ~

Also, most of the joists that I can see are running 16 on center. The one almost in the middle of the room runs 12 on center but the one up against the outside wall, that runs more like 11 on center.

Also, when I started again on the second side, instead of a 2x4, there's these larger boards, either 2 x 6's or 2x8's. They go all the way down to the lathe and plaster and appear to be nailed to the joists. The 2x4 that was attached to the hardwood floor, although it's hard to tell from the pic, appears to be newer than the joists. Not sure if that matters. It doesn't appear to be as new as the brand new looking 2x4's, but it's not as discoloured as the joists or the other 2x6's or 2x8's (whatever they are) that run down behind the drywall.


The old owners said the kitchen had hardwood floors that they didn't want to refinish, so they put the fake tiles over it. I go down in the basement and I can see they removed the stuff I was removing in the baby's room and laid hardwood directly down on the joists. In the downstairs bathroom, next to the kitchen, I can see the same stuff I was pulling up in the baby's room. Even though they measure 3/4" thick, I think they're 1x4 pine and I think that's the subfloor, not old hardwood. Man, I really messed this up! I wonder if I should try cutting the broken pieces that go out into the hallway off and trying to put down some 1x4 boards to undo what I did...then get some sander type machine and level it all, then put plywood directly over that or something. Maybe try to insulate the parts of the floor that aren't insulated. What do you think?
 

Last edited by Spork Schivago; 09-03-16 at 08:38 PM. Reason: added joists spacing.
  #67  
Old 09-04-16, 04:42 AM
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At this point I would call in a pro to asses what you have. I can't get a clear picture of what you have there. Call in a builder/contractor to assess the subfloor work and see if it's something you can do yourself or require a professional. You could wind up in trouble if there is structural work involved.
 
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Old 09-04-16, 10:03 AM
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JIMMIEM,

It's a bit hard to tell from the pics and everything. I can try posting a video if you'd like. I'd like to hold off on the contractor from now, if possible.

Everything I say from here on out will be as if we just walked into the room. So if I say the back left corner, that's from walking into the room and looking at the very back left of the room.

Minus the very first far left floor board I removed, the rest on the back wall there are laid a little bit behind the drywall. I've been able to remove all the nails very easy like. One on the right side of the board, one directly on top. There's issues with the wall that's closest to the door, but I'm wondering why I cannot just cut the floorboards there that run into the hallway in the middle of a joist and just put the plywood down and attach it to the joists?

From looking at the basement, that appears what they did with the hardwood in the kitchen. They didn't use plywood though, they just removed the old 1 x 4 subfloor and put the hardwood directly over the joists. We can see that from the basement. At the wall where the bathroom is, they got the old subfloor for the bathroom on the same joist as the hardwood flooring they installed.

So long as there's no more floor boards attached to 2x4's or whatnot, I don't see why I couldn't proceed with removing this stuff...just gotta find away to cut it at the joists. There should be a joist for the walls. Does that make sense to you at all?
 
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Old 09-04-16, 10:50 AM
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There isn't necessarily a floor joists dedicated to support a wall. They all play a part. The danger with removing subfloor from under a wall is if that wall is load bearing - it will allow the load above to sag. It isn't uncommon to have to add a short piece of floor joist to support the end of the new subfloor.
 
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Old 09-04-16, 02:28 PM
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Marksr, I was thinking the same, adding a short piece of floor joist between the joists, that runs perpendicular to the joists, for the plywood to attach too, to make it not bouncy or whatever there. We now have one of those oscillating tools with a blade made to cut wood flush with the wall. I'm wondering if I should cut the old floor boards directly at the edge of the wall or try cutting behind the drywall some how.

We just got the call one of our friends died so I might not be on much for a bit.
 
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Old 09-04-16, 03:46 PM
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So, just so you guys have a clearer idea of what I'm talking about, the outside wall, where the floorboards go further behind the drywall, it has 2x8's for studs that are attached to the 2x8 floor joists, minus that first 2x4 that was attached by one nail to the floor boards. Because the wall that I'm talking about runs parallel with the floor joists, we can assume it's not load bearing, right? Same with the wall that goes to the hallway, correct? There's no beams in the basement for that wall at all, none in the attic. The only walls that have the beams in the basement is the stair way one. When you walk into the baby's room, that's the right wall. That's a load bearing wall, for certain. I also believe the living room might be a load bearing wall as well.

Is it safe to assume I can remove those floor boards on the walls that aren't load bearing, so long as they're not attached to anything minus the floor joists? The bedroom protrudes further out than the rest of that side of the house. Where the rest of the house walls are (around the middle of the baby's bedroom), I can see what I think are called point loads. You know, a bunch of 2x8's all together. They line up perfectly with the outside wall of the master bedroom, which isn't as far out as the baby's bedroom. I believe those are for load bearing applications, am I right?
 
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Old 09-04-16, 05:35 PM
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The outside walls are load bearing. The wall rests on a joist and that joist rests on the sill and foundation.
 
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Old 09-04-16, 06:44 PM
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Here's a picture of the outside wall. I know where that floor board was attached to the 2x4, there's nothing under that part of the room. No first floor at all, no basement.

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The rest of the room goes down in the basement though. From looking down there though, I don't see one of those really big 8x8" boards that are for the other two load bearing walls. I do see one behind the concrete down there and it might be big, but from how close it is to the outside, it looks like one of those 2x8's again, if not a 4x8.

Could that be bad? Should there be a 8x8 board down on that octogonal room (we call it the den)? The baby's bedroom is square, the den, directly below, is shaped like a stop sign.

The two 8x8's aren't really 8x8's. One is a 4x8 with two 2x8's nailed to the sides, the other is a 6x8 with one 2x8 nailed to the side. I know all the studs, so far, on that one outside wall are attached to the floor joists. They're all 2x8's, minus that one newer 2x4. I'm thinking someone did some work on it from the outside maybe, or when they redid the room with the insulation and drywall they put up.
 
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Old 09-04-16, 07:09 PM
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The floor joists that support the wall and floor of the octagonal area are cantilevered. You don't want to remove anything that the wall framing is resting on.
 
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Old 09-04-16, 08:04 PM
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So as long as I don't remove anything that the wall frame is resting on, I can continue removing the floorboards? If so, I think we're back in action JIMMIEM! It was only that one 2x4 that was attached to that first floorboard, nothing else. Even in that area, I can see the frame is still attached to the joist, not to the floor. Not really sure what the 2x4 was for, but I'm sure they put it in there for one reason or another...
 
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Old 09-05-16, 04:30 AM
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As long as you don't remove any floor boards from under the boards that the wall studs are sitting on. Also, if you cut any floor boards make sure the cut end has support under it and the plywood edge is supported too. Do you own the whole building? Are you working on the floor where the octagon wall is?
 
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Old 09-05-16, 09:29 AM
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We own the entire house (my wife and I) and I'm working on the floor where the octagon wall is. The boards are coming out real easy, minus the wall next to the hallway, because the boards go under the wall, into the hallway, minus where there's a stud nailed to the joists. I'm going to cut them flush with the multi tool once my wife brings home a respirator. That dust is tearing me up!

The joists run the opposite way as the door, kinda, perpendicular I think it's called. The door frame and door is at an angle. I don't know where the cut the floorboards there. I'm attaching some pics and maybe you can show me. Also, I think I need to remove the molding around the door frame in order to cut the floorboards that are under the molding (one on the left and one on the right of the door).

Here's the door frame and this is the pic where I need to know where to cut:
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This picture here shows how the doorway is at an angle compared to the rest of the room.
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I'm definitely going to by laying the new hardwood at a 45 degree angle. Not sure which way I'm supposed to lay it though. With the boards running this way /// or them laying this way \\\. I don't think it'd really matter, just not sure which one would look best. I'll probably go with the /// way.
 
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Old 09-05-16, 10:47 AM
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Is the doorway angle 45 degrees? If not you may be cutting some of the new hardwood flooring at a different angle.....miter saw. When you install the new hardwood flooring it will look best if you undercut the door jambs and trim and slide the flooring under to give a nice clean look......similar to how it will look when you install baseboards......the hardwood flooring 'disappears' underneath.
Don't remove the door trim.....undercut now to give you room to work. In order for the new hardwood flooring to have a good fit under the door trim use the oscillating multi tool with a plunge blade. Lay a piece of scrap plywood subfloor on top of the existing flooring and rest the tool blade on the plywood. This will ensure that the undercut will the at the correct height for the new plywood subfloor and new hardwood flooring. You can either let the new hard flooring flow through the door into the hall or install new hardwood flooring across the doorway from jamb to jamb to make a flush transition header and create a stopping point for the room you are currently in. When you do the hallway you will abut the new hardwood flooring in the hallway to the transition. Letting the flooring flow or creating a transition is a matter of personal taste.
 
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Old 09-05-16, 11:58 AM
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I have this blade for the oscillating tool that I've been using for the drywall and old subfloor. I can cut the old door trim by using the 3/4" board on top of the current floor, to give me the new height, like you've suggested. That's how I've been cutting the drywall, but I think with the drywall, I need to go another 3/4" in height. The plywood will be 3/4", the hardwood would be 3/4". Currently, if I laid down the plywood and the hardwood, the drywall would go right down to the hardwood. Don't I want a 3/4" gap from the hardwood and the drywall so if liquid is spilled, the drywall won't act as a sponge?

I'm looking at this picture: http://i.stack.imgur.com/9pzqu.gif It shows what a door jamb is. Just so I'm certain on this, I would cut the floorboard on the outside of the room where the door jamb starts, right?

I would rather run it out into the hallway, up to the opposite wall, so when we do the hallway, I wouldn't need transition header at all. But it's going to be a very long time before we can do the hallway and currently, there's these really old tiles up there that are stuck down. I tried taking one up, but it started to break so I stopped. It'd look very weird to have tile and then a patch of hardwood I think and by the time we get to the hallway, the hardwood would be worn differently than the new stuff, so I think it's probably best to just cut at the door jamb.

I'm not sure how to cut the subfloor that's currently under the doorway trim. Even with a 3/4" gap, I won't be able to get the oscillator under there without using it at an angle. Am I allowed to do that?

Not sure how to check the angle of the doorway. How would I measure that? From the joist that's close by, I think it's around 20 degrees to the joist, mabe 110 degrees from the side wall there.
 
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Old 09-05-16, 12:24 PM
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You'll want your new hardwood flooring to go under the door jamb and door trim....so you'll undercut both with the multi tool. The drywall can extend down to the top of the new hardwood flooring.....you won't butt the new hardwood flooring tight to the plane of the drywall you want to hold it back at little....the baseboard will cover the gap. This gap will be part of the expansion gap which you will need to leave....especially along the wall that has the new hardwood flooring installed parallel to it. After you have undercut the door jamb and door trim.....if the current floor has a nail in it you may have to use a chisel to split the floor board in order to remove it. If there is a nail you can cut it flush with the multi with a metal cutting blade or pry it out with a pry bar, pliers, or whatever tool you have. There are different ways to find the angle of the door and short section of wall in relation to the rest of the room. An inexpensive tool you can use is a speed square. You can also use a compass. You can also lay a board against the long wall near the door and draw a line on it the is perpendicular to a line that runs between the door jambs. Take this board and lay it on your miter saw and swing the blade so it's at the same angle as the line on the board......this is the angle of the doorway in relation to the rest of the room. If you lay the room at a 45 degree angle you will have to adjust the door way angle by 45 degrees.
 
 

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