Help matching a stain

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  #1  
Old 08-31-16, 05:49 PM
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Help matching a stain

My dog had an accident on my wood floor. A 1 inch by 1 inch portion of the floor turned black. I lightly sanded the floor and applied 3% hydrogen peroxide to the area. The floor area is now no longer black, but must be restained. For some reason I'm having a real problem getting a stain to match. I'm using minwax because that's what is easiest to get where I live. Can anyone recommend a minwax stain color to match the original stain? I believe the floor is oak. I've posted a picture of the floor with the desired stain color. Based on pictures online using minwax stain on an oak floor I've tried golden oak and gunstock but golden oak was too light and gunstock too red. I'm thinking of trying colonial maple, red oak, early american or maybe even sedona red. If anyone can help narrow it down or pin point the correct stain I would be very thankful. Name:  photo (2).jpg
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  #2  
Old 08-31-16, 07:14 PM
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Golden oak would have been my guess. A couple of hints. If top coating with oil based poly, it will darken the color some; water based is pretty clear. If you will be using oil based, then judge your color with the top coat.

You can mix a little darker stain in with the golden oak to shift the color, or you can add artist colors (universal art colors, available at any hobby/art store). Burnt umber or Vandyke brown are good colors to try when you are in brownish shades and want it darker.
 
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Old 08-31-16, 07:33 PM
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You have sand the finish off, right? It won't penetrations into the wood if you haven't sanded all the finish off. And even then it may still be too light. Your poly finish has darkened over time.

The other minwax colors you suggested wont be even close. Honestly I would have also said Minwax golden oak, but you could also try Minwax Fruitwood, Ipswich pine, puritan pine. Colonial maple will probably be too orange/red. Watco light oak or honey maple would be a good match too I think. But sanding the finish down to bare wood is essential.
 
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Old 08-31-16, 07:58 PM
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Yes, it's definitely sanded off. The picture I posted does not include the spot that was sanded, just the normal color of my floor for reference. Is a gel better for "spot treatment" or is this just a matter of trial and error with the traditional stains?
 
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Old 08-31-16, 08:36 PM
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With a gel, the tendency for some people is to leave too much of it on the surface, almost like paint. That can affect the adhesion of the finish as the solvents can dissolve the semi-dried stain and smear it around. Either type of stain needs to be wiped easily. The gels are just more user friendly for someone that wants to use that type of product.
 
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Old 08-31-16, 09:04 PM
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The gel stain makes it easier to avoid lap marks in things such as furniture, you just need a stain that is color matched. Easier said than done.
I live in a large city with many paint stores and cabinet makers. If I have trouble matching stain I go straight to Sherwin Williams, that's the best results I have found.
Maybe not every store, but some can work magic.
 
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Old 09-01-16, 03:12 AM
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Most paint stores [not paint depts] are good at matching paint and stains. I've never been fond of gel stains but maybe I'm just old school and used to using the old thin penetrating stains.

I'm also leaning towards golden oak, red oak is too red and early american is too brown. The wood is definitely oak. A pic or two of the area needing help would garner more advice.
 
  #8  
Old 09-01-16, 07:21 AM
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So this picture obviously has the problem area and is in natural light. Yesterday's was taken at night with the lights on.Name:  photo (3).jpg
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  #9  
Old 09-01-16, 10:05 AM
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So you only sanded a few square inches? Did you create a dip in the floor when you sanded?
It looks like there is still a little moisture damage in the surrounding boards.
 
  #10  
Old 09-01-16, 10:29 AM
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It's fairly level, no distinguishable dip. I tried to "feather" the sanding. The area was very small, but very black and extremely noticeable. Almost like someone dropped black ink on the floor. The dog had an accident and no one noticed it until later in the day which turned about a 1x1 inch portion totally black. The other boards looked like that prior to the incident. Eventually in the next year or so I am going to have the whole floor done professionally, but in the mean time I can't leave it looking the way it does.
 
  #11  
Old 09-01-16, 10:37 AM
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Take some golden oak - or whatever color you think is appropriate [pics can be misleading] and wipe over the sanded area with it. Hopefully it will blend ok other than not having a sheen. The best way to get the poly not to stand out like a sore thumb is to apply it to an entire board [s] Poly comes in 3 basic sheens; gloss, semi-gloss or satin. Your does not appear to be gloss.
 
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