1st Timer - flooring planning stage

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  #1  
Old 09-12-16, 01:02 PM
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1st Timer - flooring planning stage

Hello,

My wife and I are building a house that should be done in about 9 weeks. After 2 hours of youtube and lots of reading we are thinking about battling solid hardwood floors ourselves (nailed down). But I have a couple questions...



1. Based off the floor plan I'm thinking I would start against the 17 2" wall? That's where I start my first line right?

2. Assuming I'm correct on question 1. I would need two significant direction changes and one smaller one. One to feed into the Nook, one to feed into the Study and one smaller one for the Pantry correct? Looking at using slip tongue. Is this the right idea?

3. The one area that concerns me is the Study. As you can see the study entry is angled. I do this exactly like everything else? I just have to cut my board edges at a angle or do I have to do something completely out of the norm to overcome the transition into that room?

4. Do you guys see any other tricky areas that I may have missed here?

Thanks for all the help!
 
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Old 09-12-16, 01:06 PM
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Normally the hardwood is laid perpendicular to the floor joists. Do you know which direction they run?
While I wouldn't think twice about laying and finishing the floor, I'd consider hiring out the initial sanding, it is easy to get in trouble with a drum sander
 
  #3  
Old 09-12-16, 01:10 PM
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The joists run from front to back here. So I'll be laying the wood from left to right based on the floor plan if that makes sense?

We're going to buy 3/4" pre finished hardwood of some variety. 5" wide plank most likely.
 
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Old 09-12-16, 01:14 PM
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Good choice, the main thing is to measure correctly [where needed] and make sure your joints are tight. The prefinished hardwood has a tougher finish than site applied.
 
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Old 09-12-16, 02:50 PM
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You don't necessarily want to start with a full strip against the starting wall because you may end up with a very narrow piece at the opposite end. So you want to measure the area and figure out how many strips of flooring will be needed, allowing for the gaps around the edges. If you come out with, say, 50 and one quarter, you would start with a strip ripped to 5/8 of it's width, then have 49 full strips, and end with another 5/8 width piece. That way you don't have 1/4 of a strip at one end.

Also, check that the room is square. If it's not square, you want to plan whether you will lay parallel to one wall and end up with a taper at the other, or split the difference, so you have a little taper at the start and at the end.

For the angled study entrance, typical would be to have an angled transition piece under the door, but lay the flooring in the same direction, just cutting the ends at proper angle to die into the transition.
 
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Old 09-13-16, 08:18 AM
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Is there any point to doing the angled transition piece under the door other than look? Or is to "reset" the point you made in the first paragraph. So you can kind of figure out the room and cut the same amount off of both the starting board and ending board?

I appreciate the advice on kind of laying things out before tying that entire first row down. I think I get everything you're saying. I'm going to have a tough section probably either way though since that family room wall will both feed the other side of the family room but also the dining room. One side might not work out too well. That's hard to plan around.
 
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Old 09-13-16, 09:30 AM
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If you want the floor to flow continuously throughout the first floor....and I'm reading the diagram correctly, I would run a center baseline from the family room through the dining room and then lay the floor in 2 directions. I'm assuming the halldown is part of the first floor. Are you laying the hardwood in the kitchen too?
 
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Old 09-13-16, 09:39 AM
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Here's a picture of an angle transition.
 
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Last edited by JIMMIEM; 09-13-16 at 09:40 AM. Reason: typo
  #9  
Old 09-13-16, 10:40 AM
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Yes the diagram is all the first floor. The hall down and foyer are basically all part of the dining room. It's an open floor plan so that's all one level. There's a support pillar you can see on the floor plan at the corner of the hall down, dining room and foyer. And yes we are going to be laying hardwood in the kitchen, nook and pantry too. That is the plan at least?

Ok so I was understanding the transition right in my mind, but i actually thought you guys were talking about it like this... where the boards would run the opposite direction in the study?

Looks like you replied in my post on the "other" website too. I appreciate the help!

 
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Old 09-13-16, 10:49 AM
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I wasn't...the other posters may have. My suggestions, assuming you want the flooring to flow throughout the first floor and have no transition points was to lay a baseline down the longest 'line' on the first floor which would be from the family room to the dining room. You would lay the floor in both directions from the baseline. This would allow one continuous flow through the first floor. If you want a transition in the doorway it would look like my picture.....you don't need the transition if you don't want it.
 
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Old 09-13-16, 03:53 PM
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Probably a good idea to start in the middle, spline and work out in both directions to control expansion and contraction issues. As Mark said, your flooring should be installed perpendicular to the joist system to prevent possible "waves being visible from deflection between the joists. Here are the guidelines for wood flooring installation. Pay attention to he thickness and material construction of the subfloor. http://tinytimbers.com/pdf/nwfa-install-guidelines.pdf
 
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Old 09-13-16, 04:47 PM
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I'm confused about the direction of the floor joists. Looking at the blueprint do the joists run left to right or top to bottom. I based my suggestion on the joists running left to right......if this is not the case then the Baseline I suggested is running in the wrong direction assuming the flooring will run perpendicular to the joists.
 
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Old 09-13-16, 08:17 PM
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Jim - Thank goodness you asked this cause I thought i had this pretty much figured out and I was awfully confused at this point. The floor joists run from front to back NOT left to right. The front of the house is the bottom in the picture. Where the foyer is...foyer = front.

My plan was to run my wood floors from left to right perpendicular to the joists. With that said where do you stand now on recommendations.

Czizz - It's a brand new house. The subfloor is plywood and everything should be pretty darn square. I know brand new houses don't always necessarily mean that, but nothing has settled or anything like that.
 
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Old 09-14-16, 03:53 AM
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I've painted a lot of new residential construction and while all the floors should be level - I wouldn't bank on everything being perfectly square.
 
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Old 09-14-16, 04:33 AM
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Would it be possible to post a sharper picture of the blueprint....or tell me how to sharpen this one.....I've gone to Photobucket but can't seem to do anything with it. My problem is, based on what I can make out I'm thinking the flooring would be more aesthetically pleasing if it ran from front to back so when you walk in the front door, which I think is at the bottom left, it would be as if you were looking down a bowling alley toward the pins. The long line of the house and rooms seem to run this way too and generally flooring looks better this way instead of looking across the floor boards. But, this would be the same direction as the joists....which is not generally recommended but can be done with a good joist and subfloor system. Of course a diagonal layout would be a good comprise if you like the look and additional work.
 
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Old 09-14-16, 06:25 AM
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Mark - Understood. I'm trying to be hopeful. I'm hoping I don't have to do any crazy tapers and stuff as a first timer.

Jim - Here ya go, but I can tell you I've seen floors laid in this same model and they are left to right. It looks great. As a first timer I don't think i'm gonna tackle diagonal that sounds tough. I think I want to stick with the left to right theme so i'm perpendicular to my joists as a first timer. But I am still very much seeking your guys guidance on everything else. To include the transition to the study, transition to the bath #3 and transition into the nook.

 
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Old 09-14-16, 06:51 AM
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Did the model you saw have all the flooring running in the same direction? Where there any transitions in the doorways or to separate the rooms? Hardwood flooring in the bathroom? What's between the family room, kitchen and nook? The 17 2 1/2 you mentioned....is that in the Family room....it runs from the Study wall to what? As MarkSr said don't expect perfectly square even in a new house......spend a lot of time up front measuring and planning the layout so you will know what adjustments you might need to make before you start.
 
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Old 09-15-16, 08:56 AM
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I'm gonna go by the model again this weekend and check it out.

Another question slightly off topic for you guys. My wife pointed out some random width wood floor that we really liked. It had 3.5" 4" and 4.75" wide planks. When she first pointed it out...I was like oh my lord no way. It'll be complicated enough for us first timers. After talking with you guys I'm wondering if that statement is actually true? Would the variable widths just make it easier in terms of being able to easily make the ends work?

Has anyone installed the random width flooring?
 
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Old 09-15-16, 09:36 AM
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Random widths shouldn't make any difference ..... unless you go brain dead halfway thru the job and try to put wide and narrow in the same row
 
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Old 09-15-16, 09:40 AM
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Hmm I might consider going that way then because than I have a couple different widths that can work out at the end. May save me some time in ripping. Do you advise using some sort of pattern or just keep it random?
 
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Old 09-15-16, 09:43 AM
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I've not paid a lot of attention to random width flooring but you want a pattern. I think it's normally wide,narrow,wide,narrow, etc.
 
  #22  
Old 09-15-16, 10:30 AM
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As MARKSR said the rows will alternate but the boards in a row will all be the same width. I would not let the 'ripping at the end' situation be the reason for choosing to go with random width......it may help in one room but not another. Go with random width because you like what it looks like. When you do random width you will need to figure out many boxes of each width to buy. With fixed width the calculation is easy. But, there is a program available that will do the calculation for you....it was written by Don Bollinger, who also has a book on flooring installation. Ripping flooring boards on a table saw is easy....can also be done with hand power tools but the narrower the rip the harder the job. Good layout planning will help ensure that the pieces you need to rip won't be too narrow.
With the random width you can decide what pattern you want....find some random width installations or check on-line for examples. This is a one-and-done type of project so take your time on deciding.....you won't want a do-over.
 
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