Best way to start this hardwood next to existing hardwood?

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  #1  
Old 09-20-16, 09:17 AM
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Best way to start this hardwood next to existing hardwood?

I am adding a new hardwood floor that will be connecting to an existing hardwood. I am trying to determine the best way to make the connection at the threshold of the existing room. Ideally I would like it to be able to do it without a transition board but would go with a transition if that's what ends up being the easiest and better way to do it?

I am thinking my options are:

1. Start laying at opposite side of room and finish at doorway using a T-Molding transition strip. I would rip the last pieces to fit along the baseboard with a 1/2" expansion gap.

2. Start as I have pictured below? Place one piece up against existing floor's last board which falls in the doorway threshold and start the new floor's first complete row after that? The piece against the doorway threshold extends 1" past the base molding so the first row would also be 1" from the base molding. Can I get away with starting the new floor's first row that far away and use a thicker quarter round to cover that gap?

Here is a pic of what I'm talking about if that helps.
(The green text says: "This would be a piece that would span the doorway threshold like the one before it")
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  #2  
Old 09-20-16, 10:06 AM
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I would undercut the baseboard and the drywall behind it, depending on the thickness of the baseboard. This area would become the expansion gap so that you could rip down the first row of flooring so it would line up with the new board that you are laying in the doorway. I would not start laying from the opposite side of the room and I would not use a wide shoe (quarter round) molding as it would be thicker than the molding around the corner and would not line up with it. Does the last board in the doorway have its groove? If so, then you will need to add a spline/slip tongue to join the first new board that you will be installing. If it has a tongue then the spline/slip tongue would be added to the first new board so that the tongue would face into the room that you will be adding the new flooring to. The baseboard can be cut with a jamb saw or with an oscillating multi tool. The shoe (quarter round) molding will hide the gap. If you decide to do the baseboard/drywall undercutting the wider the gap the wider your first row can be.
 
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Old 09-20-16, 11:04 AM
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Thanks for the info! The last board in the doorway has neither a tongue or a groove. It's just flat. I thought that was strange. Because of that should I just go with the t-transition board and call it a day?
 
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Old 09-20-16, 05:03 PM
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Does the last board without a tongue or groove look like a regular floor board that is missing it's tongue? If so, they installer may have just removed the tongue. You can cut a groove in the edge with the board in place....this would be done with a router and slot cutting or biscuit cutter bit. You could also use a biscuiting tool to cut the biscuit slot. It's your choice. If you have the tools and the desire you can cut a slot in this board and then continue as I suggested in my previous response. This is not that difficult to do.
 
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Old 09-20-16, 06:10 PM
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The flat to flat transition is an issue and would look into the suggestion of a biscuit joint to tie the two floors together similar to a spline transition. I also hate to see that the original floor used 1/4 round molding. I would so like to see you remove the baseboard molding in the new room and rip the base down to marry with the old base molding. You then can hide your expansion under the base and use shoe (much thinner) to finish the install.

Side note, please verify that he subfloor of OSB is a minimum of 3/4" thick as that is the minimum standard for nail down flooring.
 
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Old 09-21-16, 05:41 AM
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Thanks for the tips. Yup, it looks like the board is missing the tongue. My current plan is to do as you suggest with a biscuit joiner. I am going to rip about 3/4" off a board that will fit in the doorway transition and biscuit join this to the existing floor board. I'll leave the tongue side of the board I rip and face that into the room. That will make it so I don't have to cut into the baseboard and I will have the correct smaller expansion gap. As long as it looks good I'll go with it. If it doesn't then I will just biscuit join a full width board to the existing floor and rip the rest of the first row pieces as needed to line up for the first row.

I would love to rip up the base molding and fit the expansion gaps under it but the entire rest of the downstairs was done by the builders using the 1/4 round so I am just going to do the same. The main goal is getting rid of some god awful carpet and replacing with wood.
 
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Old 09-21-16, 06:23 AM
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Your plan will work...should only have to rip 1/2" off the 'transition' board. You wouldn't have to remove the baseboard to cut the bottom 3/4" off of it. You could use an undercut jamb saw, angle grinder, or oscillating multi tool. The quarter round would hide the cut edge so it wouldn't have to be a perfect cut.
 
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Old 09-22-16, 09:27 AM
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So I've decided to reproduce something like
I yanked up the last board of the existing floor and replaced with a new one with a tongue. I am going to use a full length and width piece across the threshold that I will L cut when it extends past the corner. I removed the baseboard and cut away some drywall at the bottom to give me more space against the wall so I don't have to rip a lot off the first row boards. This should leave me almost 2" width of material for the first row boards even with a 3/8 expansion gap. I'll rip down the baseboards before replacing them. I wasn't crazy about working with really thin boards so I am happy with this plan all around. I also wasn't sure how a visible ripped end of a board would look against the threshold so, now that I'm using full piece, I don't have to worry about that either.

Thanks for all the help and input!
 
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