How to hammer in shoe molding?

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  #1  
Old 12-11-16, 01:09 PM
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How to hammer in shoe molding?

We had a botched flooring job where the contractor did not bring nails to the job. Now we have to finish it ourselves.

We got 18 gauge nails, 1.5 inches. Problem is we can't hammer them in. They either bend, or the one I did have success with only goes so far and stops with about 1/4 inch of it still out. We are super frustrated. Someone mentioned we should pre drill holes. Is that true? But how would this solve the problem of the one nail only going so far?

Thanks.
 
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  #2  
Old 12-11-16, 01:16 PM
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Ideally you'd use a nail gun but if you have to nail them in by hand predrilling will help. Remember the shoe gets nailed to the base board, not the floor.
 
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Old 12-11-16, 01:22 PM
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Glue for shoe molding?

We had a terrible experience with a contractor, they did not bring the nails for the shoe molding. Then said they would make do by using liquid nails to attache the shoe molding.

I know nothing about flooring but my first thought was that sounded like a shortcut, rather than the proper way to do it.

Later on the phone he told me he uses glue all the time for shoe molding. Is glue ok to use? Tks
 
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Old 12-11-16, 01:26 PM
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Thanks, but how do you know which drill bit to use?
 
  #5  
Old 12-11-16, 01:30 PM
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You can just chuck up one of your nails and use it. Otherwise pick a drill bit that is the same size or one size smaller than the nails.
 
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Old 12-11-16, 01:33 PM
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I wouldn't glue it, how does he propose to keep the shoe mold tight against the floor/base while the adhesive sets? I can see using an adhesive in hard to get areas [like behind a commode]
 
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Old 12-11-16, 01:42 PM
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Hi you say chuck up you mean cut off the end of the nail? tks
 
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Old 12-11-16, 01:47 PM
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Yea I figured it was a bad idea, and your point adds yet another reason why.
 
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Old 12-11-16, 01:50 PM
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No need to cut the nail, the head of the nail will fit nicely in the drill's chuck. It doesn't take much for the pointed end of the nail to 'drill' thru the shoe molding.
 
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Old 12-11-16, 02:27 PM
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Is your shoe molding 3/4 Round?
Some quarter round is very difficult to nail. Even with a nail gun it's hard to get a good angle and have the brad hit straight into the wood, the brads tend to bend.

A nail gun should do the job. For difficult areas, drill a small pilot hole and use brads and a nail set.
When applying trim around cabinets I will not use a nail set if the nail gun doesn't work.
Use adhesive and keep it clean. A few dabs of hot melt glue will hold the trim in place until adhesive sets.
 
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Old 12-11-16, 04:37 PM
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I have merged your two threads on this issue.
 
  #12  
Old 12-11-16, 07:19 PM
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Get some 4D finish nails. Cut the head off one, put it in a drill and predrill the holes. Hammer the nails in and use a nail set to get the head just below the surface. If you can get a nail gun use a 16 gauge finish nail...18 gauge would work but a tad small, 15 gauge would be a tad big.
 
  #13  
Old 12-13-16, 03:37 PM
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"I have merged your two threads on this issue."

So that's what happened. I was wondering why my post was not showing up. This was two seperate questions and for good reason. As you can see the question about glue has not been addressed much, probably because people did not see it attached in the middle of this thread.
 
  #14  
Old 12-13-16, 04:13 PM
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I have seen some people glue shoe down, but don't know how it lasts long-term.
 
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Old 12-13-16, 04:20 PM
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Ask santa for a finish nailer and small compressor and you'll be done with everything before the day is over!!
 
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Old 12-13-16, 04:33 PM
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Marq, he has a brad nailer. See post 1.

Gluing the shoe is stupid, as mentioned, if you need to push it tight to the floor, glue isn't going to hold it down, it will want to spring up. This question has been answered sufficiently. If your brad nailer isn't driving the nails they are either too long and are hitting concrete that is behind the baseboard or you don't have the pressure on your regulator turned up high enough. Set it at 90 - 100 lbs. Some guns are also finicky about what length nails they will shoot and which they wont. Your gun might prefer 1 1/4 or 1 5/8 for all we know. Look at how they are loaded in the magazine and see if the heads are binding.

Clip the nails that are still sticking out and set them with a nail set.
 
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Old 12-13-16, 04:47 PM
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In case you didn't see my previous post.
The only place I glue down shoe (3/4" hardwood quarter round) is around cabinetry.
Even then it's only in certain areas that I know doesn't have the backing strong enough to accept a nail or a Brad gun.
You can't pound a nail in a weak area, and even a 18 gauge brad nailer might not sink fully into hardwood and then you have problems.

If you're nailing into a wall you should have no problem sinking a nail or a brad.

Edit: after seeing X's post I will add a tip. Hold the gun at a low angle and take one nail at a time. You can't nail quickly. Hold the gun firmly and don't pull back until nailing is complete.
My advice was for a rare situation where a brad won't sink due to reverberation or bouncing.
 
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