Beveling baseboards


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Old 01-31-17, 03:17 PM
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Beveling baseboards

I have laid in a new laminate floor and now wish to install the baseboards. Due to some aspects, I have two different sizes - 5" tall and 7-1/2" tall. Both are too wide/tall to cut a bevel (for joining at the corners) with my 10" table saw. Is there some way to cut these bevels? I'm at a loss as to how to get them cut so they join at the corners. Or am I missing something?
 
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Old 01-31-17, 03:35 PM
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You don't generally miter inside corners... they get coped. Outside corners get mitered. And you generally use a miter saw to install base, not a table saw.

If a table saw is the only tool you have, you would need to use a miter gauge that has a hold down, and a large table or jig to hold the piece perpendicular to the blade, since it will néed to be flat on the table, with the saw blade set at a 45.

Not a real good way to do it. That's why the miter saw was created.
 
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Old 01-31-17, 03:39 PM
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Post some pictures.
All the base molds need to be the same size.
I agree 110% no way would I be using a table saw for trim work unless I was ripping it.
 
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Old 01-31-17, 04:11 PM
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I didn't make myself clear; each baseboard size will be on different walls. Each wall will have it's one size.
I know about miter saws but I thought the height/width of the boards would be outside of the diameter of the blade, therefore couldn't be cut.
I don't understand the terminology; isn't coping just an 'inside' miter?
As I understood mitering, the board sits upright and the blade comes in at an angle, cutting the piece vertically.
I'm getting a whole bunch of 'backend fetch' errors when I try to reply and half of my reply is lost; at least the part that wasn't autosaved.
I'll try again - The saw blade can only cut a little less than half its diameter, so if the piece is wider/taller than that, it can't cut it. Neither one of my pieces are less than 5" so a 10" blade won't cut it through.
I feel like I'm missing something here (just my ignorance, I guess).
 
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Old 01-31-17, 04:15 PM
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Angry

Well, that posted without an error - whew!
 
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Old 01-31-17, 04:18 PM
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You lay the piece flat on the miter saw table and bevel the blade. Not upright against the fence. And a 12" miter saw helps cut wider stock.
 
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Old 01-31-17, 04:39 PM
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I'm really not understanding why there are different heights of speedbase in the rooms. Is there a reason for it? You will need a 12" belt driven saw with a remote motor like Dewalt or Ridgid to cut really tall base in one movement.
 
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Old 01-31-17, 05:10 PM
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A cope starts with mitering the end, then a coping saw is used to cut along the edge, creating a flat end that will mate against the other piece. It's a little more effort to do, but is a lot more forgiving to install and tolerates minor movement and misalignment better than an inside miter would.

http://www.kelleher.com/documents/Coping.pdf
 
 

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