Flattening out a mix of subfloors


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Old 03-06-17, 08:10 PM
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Flattening out a mix of subfloors

We are renovating a house which has been added on to several times and had 4 layers of flooring installed. We've pulled up down to the subfloor, and part of it is particle board over slats, some is just two layers of particle board, and a small portion is original hardwood. None of this is even with one another, and there are low spots in a couple places. Some is being replaced because of water damage anyway, so trying to figure out whether we just just pull almost everything and re-lay OSB or plywood, or is there a good option to fill gaps and flatten it all out.
 

Last edited by Kyle Gray; 03-06-17 at 10:48 PM.
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Old 03-06-17, 08:16 PM
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The good news is that if you have particle board, the decision is much easier... all particle board should be removed. Its not suitable for doghouses.
 
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Old 03-07-17, 01:16 AM
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Yes, the fact that this question is in the hardwood forum is an easy call that all the particle board needs to be removed. Additional layers may be 1/4" with linoleum/vinyl on top or something like that. Tell us what your intentions are as far as finished flooring and we can better help with the support structure needed for said flooring.
 
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Old 03-07-17, 10:17 PM
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Thanks for the input, and between the low spots and mixed materials, I suspected that might be the best route. I'll look forward to prying all that out this weekend.

Planning on going with engineered wood floor or vinyl since there's possibility for a good bit of moisture. (This is a lake house). Would welcome any recommendations on what to put down.
 
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Old 03-08-17, 03:42 AM
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3/8" click lock engineered flooring is easy and fast to install. It holds up to traffic quite well. I would not, as a matter of principle, put any wood product in a wet area, ie. kitchen or bathroom. It seems to be the posh thing to do, and it looks great, but my "physics" mind won't let me do it. I prefer something impervious or replaceable, such as ceramic tile or vinyl in those areas. Being a lake house, you may want to check the support of the floor you have, such as thickness of subflooring, type and spacing of the joists and the total unsupported span of the joists in order to accommodate a tile installation.
 
 

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