What species of wood do I have?

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  #1  
Old 04-18-17, 08:38 AM
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What species of wood do I have?

Hello Everyone,

I'm curious if someone might be able to help me with the best option for my floors. I sanded the finish off of them and used a satin clear polyurethane and am a little discouraged as the the result. The first picture was before when they were sanded and the second is after a single coat of the polyurethane. Can anyone tell me the species of wood and the best way to get an absolute clear coat if that's possible? I'd appreciate any tips!

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Old 04-18-17, 09:09 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

I believe that's white oak. It generally takes 3 coats of poly [sanding and removing the dust between coats] to get a nice slick finish. Oil base poly deepens the colors naturally in the wood while water based poly just gives it a sheen .... but if you've already applied oil poly, switching to water based won't have any effect unless you sand off all of the oil poly first.
 
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Old 04-18-17, 10:34 AM
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I would have said red oak, but it could also be a mix. Also possible that some areas still had a little of the original stain left.

As mark mentioned, more coats are needed to even out the sheen... and I would say that your not being realistic if you think the floor is going to look the same with finish as it does without. The finish brings out the natural color of the wood, which may be very uneven. Thats one reason stains and dyes are used... to give the floor a more even appearance.
 
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Old 04-18-17, 12:25 PM
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Also, IMO, the satin sheen may be a problem for what it sounds like you're trying to accomplish, as it does obscure the grain just a little bit compared to gloss.
 
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Old 04-19-17, 04:30 AM
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Thanks everyone! I thought it was Red Oak too but didnt want to mention it to sway anyones opinion. I think I'll finish with the polyurethane because I really don't want to sand it all again.
 
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Old 04-19-17, 02:01 PM
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Well, you are planning a light scuff sand before the next coat, right? Unfortunately, poly needs that for good adhesion.
 
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Old 04-19-17, 02:06 PM
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The first coat of poly over raw/stained wood needs more than a scuff sand. The poly will raise the grain, more in some areas than others and you want to sand it smooth and remove the dust before applying the next coat. A scuff sand is often sufficient prior to applying the 3rd and final coat.
 
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Old 04-19-17, 03:01 PM
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In addition to a good sanding and vacuuming/tack cloth wiping, you need to improve your application so as to avoid those lap marks. A lambswool applicator on a pole is the way to go.

Spread it thin but work fast and keep a "wet edge".
 
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