Which direction to lay flooring?

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  #1  
Old 04-26-17, 07:28 AM
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Which direction to lay flooring?

Hello,

We are trying to decide which direction to lay our flooring (Pergo Outlast). Its going on the whole main level and we are wondering if it would look best going front to back (like in the photo below) or side to side. Ive posted some photos to give a better idea of the floor plan. Also a bonus photo on the kitchen progress!

Thanks in advance for the help!

https://goo.gl/photos/EeTwGr8rVyUyG3JW9
https://goo.gl/photos/FYuUy6QboTY1xEtFA
https://goo.gl/photos/2697itS1ryf8Rwk79
https://goo.gl/photos/Ukghy4hG4Nh8B3x67
https://goo.gl/photos/58Zd8tsGvs5wED9Y7

https://goo.gl/photos/qWzBAcQXFHeyPKZp6
 
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  #2  
Old 04-26-17, 09:02 AM
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Normally flooring goes opposite direction to the floor joists but for laminate it can go any direction.

Although it may be too late I would really suggest looking into a real engineered wood floor vs the laminates.

I've had laminate flooring and hated it's very existence, laminates are cheap substitutes to real wood and there are so many stories out there of people who regret going that route, myself included!
 
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Old 04-26-17, 04:08 PM
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Laminate is MDF or HDF with a picture of wood painted on it and a coating of Aluminum oxide. Not a warm and fuzzy thought with any moisture. I agree with Marq1 in trying to, at least, go with a good engineered flooring as opposed to laminate.
 
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Old 04-27-17, 03:54 AM
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To answer your question. Typically you want to run the grain with the length of the room. However, depending on the size of the room you may want to go the perpendicular. Also where a window is might make a difference as to how the light hits the floor area. Consider a diagonal pattern. If an adjoining room meets the room it might look odd if they both go in opposite directions.

As to laminated flooring. Today's floor is very good. I've used laminated flooring and have had very good results. It can stand up to very harsh conditions. Is engineered better? Sure. Are you wiling to pay for it? The only caution is using laminated in a wet area. It's a no no. That being said I used laminated in my kitchen and have had water spill and pool on it. If you wipe it up quickly you will have no problems. The al oxide coatings are very hard and scratch resistant. My dogs could not scratch it even run and skidding at full speed on it. Don't let the others sell you short on good quality laminated. Just keep in mind, price will tend to dictate quality.
 
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Old 04-27-17, 04:37 PM
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Depends on the thickness of your subflooring as to whether running the same direction of the joists is warranted or even feasible. With minimal thickness subfloors, you can bet deflection between the floor joist that can cause stress with the click lock feature of the flooring. Running perpendicular to the joists adds strength as the floor is installed offset to the adjacent piece next to it and it spans several joists which adds strength and prevents stress. So, I will disagree with the previous advice of laying the floor any way you want. This goes equally true for vinyl click locks where there is no structural integrity to the product itself and relies completely on the subfloor for support.
 
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Old 04-27-17, 05:16 PM
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So, I will disagree with the previous advice of laying the floor any way you want.
The assumption is that the floor is structurally suited and proper subflooring is used to be able to lay the top floor in any direction. A hallway with the flooring going perpendicular to the direction of the hall would look odd. Same thing with a rectangular living room with a large window that allows sunlight to shine on the floor. If laid on the short run the room would look stubby or "off". If the room is near square and one cannot decide if either direction is correct (and it does not conflict with adjoining rooms at threshold), then a diagonal pattern may give the room a more spacey feel to it.

All this is assumed to be using a wood grain patterned flooring. Otherwise all bets are off.

Also, even though my experience may be limited, I've never heard of a typical house with top flooring used in any direction to have structural problems due to direction of the joist. If so, there are bigger problems to be had other than flooring.
 
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Old 04-27-17, 05:33 PM
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Norm, while we appreciate your input, sometimes experience trumps common sense. I have seen flooring set parallel to the joists that took on an wave like appearance due to deflection between the joists. So, think what you want, I will again disagree and say that flooring should be installed perpendicular to the joists. Most hallways are centrally located which means the joists run naturally perpendicular to the hall. Are there exceptions, yes, but each needs to be field verified before moving forward. Unless you have visited hundreds of homes and evaluated subfloors, I can't see how you can guide someone with this type of installation.
 
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Old 04-27-17, 05:44 PM
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Agreed. I don't mean to belabor the argument. And you and others did tell about the pit falls concerning structure. But nobody except myself is willing to answer the OP's question, which is what looks best. As I stated, the assumption must be made that the joist and or subflooring meet minimal requirements. Your cautions about structure and subflooring is important and well stated with your reply (and certainly necessary as a caution), but again it did not answer the question asked.

By the way my answer is not my opinion, but taken from interior decorators and manufacturers suggested recommendations.
 
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Old 04-27-17, 07:29 PM
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The assumption is that the floor is structurally suited and proper subflooring is used to be able to lay the top floor in any direction.
Care to specify what a proper structurally suited subfloor consists of. I doubt any DIY'er is thinking about the structural integrity of the subfloor when researching an inexpensive way to update their flooring with a product like laminate. You can't just make a blanket statement that vague without directing members as to what is needed to accomplish what you recommend. Your previous posts simply said that you can lay the floor in any orientation/direction based on the layout of the room. More info is needed before that determination can be advised.
 
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Old 04-28-17, 07:46 AM
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I think all the flooring should run in the direction you have it laying in the photo, parallel to the patio slider throughout the house.

If there are structural issues they can be addressed. It looks like you have no excessive joist spans but we can't see a floor plan. My main concern would be is the floor flat.
 
  #11  
Old 04-28-17, 08:13 AM
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Thanks for the comments. Looks like I will be laying the floors front to back as I have the example in my photo.

The sub-floor is mostly flat, I do have to sand down some high spots. Its a 23/32 T&G OSB, so I think its plenty strong to have the Pergo run parallel with the joists.
 
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Old 04-28-17, 05:04 PM
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Guidelines from the National Wood Flooring Association on laying flooring parallel to the floor joist system.

http://tinytimbers.com/pdf/nwfa-install-guidelines.pdf


Chapter 9
Part VI

When solid strip and solid plank flooring is laid parallel with the floor joists, follow one
of these two steps below:

1.Add a layer of minimum (15/32) CD Exposure 1 (CDX) plywood underlayment to the
existing subfloor (as previously recommended).

2.Or brace between truss/joists in accordance with the truss/joist manufacturer's
recommendations and with local building codes. Some truss/joist systems cannot be
cross-braced and still maintain stability.
 
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