Large gap between flooring and wall, too much for baseboard to cover


  #1  
Old 07-25-17, 11:20 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 2
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Large gap between flooring and wall, too much for baseboard to cover

Hello,

I recently bought a house and am remodeling one of the rooms for a nursery. The last thing I need to do is put in baseboards, but the problem is there are no baseboards that are thick enough to cover the gaps between the wall and the floor. This is an issue thoughout the house, where there are many places that the flooring gap is not completely covered by the existing baseboard and quarter round. I haven't gone around the house measuring yet, but I am guessing there the gaps are around the 1.5-2" range in many places. I'm looking for a solution to cover these gaps.

I thought maybe there's a way to fill the gaps, maybe wood filler (would need a lot I think), or something like great stuff foam so I can fill the large gaps with that rather than finding a ridiculously thick baseboard.

I'll try to remember to get some pictures to post tonight. I'm not sure if there's a restriction on posting pictures for new members to the forum.

Any ideas or advice? anyone had a similar issue?
 
  #2  
Old 07-25-17, 03:04 PM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 6,541
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
Your pictures may need to be approved before they are visible as they will get caught up in the spam filter, so be patient.

If the gap is minor, you can shim the bottom of the base molding out just enough to cover the gap. Hard to believe you have a 2" gap at a wall.
 
  #3  
Old 07-25-17, 03:18 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,730
Received 854 Upvotes on 748 Posts
Is it feasible to add a narrow strip of flooring to make up some of the distance?

btw - welcome to the forums!
 
  #4  
Old 07-25-17, 03:50 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 9,745
Received 1,210 Upvotes on 1,098 Posts
You can stack 2-3 different heights of baseboards so that will give you close to 2" and then a final shoe/qtr round, will look very custom.
 
  #5  
Old 07-25-17, 04:51 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 19,281
Received 7 Upvotes on 7 Posts
I can't remember WHERE I saw it, but I remember a place that had basically a piece of 2 1/4(?)/1 7/8(?) base/casing laid flat (with the profiled edge towards the center of the room) then regular base and shoe on top of that in the normal orientation.

I believe it was explained that the rooms had had plaster walls originally and the old flooring had stopped at that point. When the plaster was replaced with sheetrock there was a large and varied gap at the bottom. The above method was used instead of shimming the entire wall or replacing all the flooring.

It looked a bit unconventional, but fit well with the age and design of the home. And those original floors were absolutely gorgeous.
 
  #6  
Old 07-26-17, 02:22 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,730
Received 854 Upvotes on 748 Posts
I remember painting a house that had the base installed as Vic described. It looked odd when I started but not so much by the time I finished the repaint.
 
  #7  
Old 07-27-17, 04:55 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 2
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
So I finally remembered to go and measure the floors, and the majority of the gaps are around 1", but the worst ones are 1.5" or just a hair larger. There are still plenty at 1.5", but if there was some option to address just the spots that were 1.5" without using 1.5" thick baseboards stacked up it could be doable.

I don't mind the idea of baseboards stacked up, but I am trying to do this on a budget due to a baby on the way. Buying a single baseboard is bad enough, let alone having to buy 3 different ones.
 
  #8  
Old 07-27-17, 04:59 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,730
Received 854 Upvotes on 748 Posts
What type of flooring do you have?
 
  #9  
Old 07-27-17, 06:15 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 9,460
Received 47 Upvotes on 43 Posts
If your flooring is the type that needs room to expand and contract be sure to allow for the worst case and do not nail or glue the perimeter.

I like the Gunguy's suggestion to cover the gap with a piece of flat trim and then install the baseboard and shoe on top.

Bud
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: