Direction of Laminate floor

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  #1  
Old 08-21-17, 12:04 PM
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Direction of Laminate floor

I am preparing to do my second laminate job and have come across something I don't have enough experience in, namely - closet doors. I'm trying to figure out which direction to run the laminate so that the closet doors and the entry doors will all work out best. One tutorial said to lay laminate between the two jambs of the closet door and then work away from it. (in line with my drawing this would be up and down lengths.) Another said to lay the laminate 90 degrees to the door jambs. (this would make it run left to right lengths.)

Which would work best? I'm also worrying about how the doors turn out, but since one door goes one way and the other another, one of them will be more of a pain to do than the other.

Would love some input from experiences folks...
(Drawing not showing, prob needs permission from admins....sorry bout that....)

 

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  #2  
Old 08-22-17, 07:33 AM
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I don't think it makes a difference. Obviously you don't want the closet flooring to be perpendicular to the room flooring. In most cases the flooring will go in the direction of the room length. But that is also based on lighting and other considerations, such as other entrance ways and cutouts. Do what looks best.
 
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Old 08-22-17, 05:29 PM
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If on a wooden floor system, the direction of the laminate should be perpendicular to the floor joists. This prevents waves in the floor that can result from deflection in the subfloor between the floor joists. If on a slab, you can decide which way you want the floor to go as it doesn't really matter other than personal choice.
 
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Old 08-23-17, 07:49 AM
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Excellent information! I had never considered the joists! Unfortunately, my other project went WITH the joists, now I feel a fool! I should have considered that. Live and learn. THANKS again!!
 
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Old 08-23-17, 11:32 AM
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Laminate is not a structural product like a wood floor so the direction it gets installed is not as important, with, across, or at an angle to the floor joists, they are all acceptable.

For your closets, are you contemplating a threshold piece, a single piece between the door jambs?

Either way the direction of the flooring should be the same inside or out of the closet!
 
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Old 08-23-17, 04:59 PM
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I know Cizzi and I butted heads on this before, but as Marq has stated it's of little importance. If your floor joist are uneven you would have noticed it on your current flooring. If your joist caused an uneven surface then most any floor would show problems. It's just not that common. Possible, yes, but common no! See my response #2.
 
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Old 08-23-17, 05:59 PM
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Deflection between the joists IS a consideration when installing parallel to the joists. Yes, Laminate is not structural, but the click lock between the planks can not take movement in the parallel direction and not have issues. Have a properly installed 1 1/4" subfloor system and I am OK. Have a minimal 1/2" subfloor system and I would never install and be able to stand by my work. The structure of the floor is built in to the click lock and the stagger between each successive row. This builds strength that works with the subfloor in the perpendicular orientation. This design feature fails when installed on an inadequate subfloor running parallel to the joists. So, install at your own risk.

Norm, I will continue to butt heads on best practices. One thing to sell the item, it is another to install and have to stand by your work.
 
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Old 08-28-17, 01:35 PM
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This brings me now to another question on this same project. The soundproofing underlayment. I WAS planning on running the lengths of foam underlayment along the longest wall (thus cutting issues with having to seal pieces together at the ends) but this means that the laminate will run WITH the foam, and not 90 degrees to it, which seems more appropriate. Or....does this matter?
 
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Old 08-28-17, 02:04 PM
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Direction of the underlayment foam is not essential to the install. It is easier to run parallel as you can lay a section and then add some more foam, lay some more and then add some foam. Perpendicular, you have to put don the whole room of underlayment first and then walk all over it during the install. More likely to tear it up and bunch it up doing it this way. Use duct tape to seal each row of foam underlaymen together unless your underlayment has a self sealing property associated with it.
 
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