expansion gap when one side can't be gapped?

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Old 05-25-18, 03:32 PM
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expansion gap when one side can't be gapped?

Sorry for the title but that's the way it came out of my thinking. Planning hardwood floor install for upstairs bedrooms and hall. Stairs will have nosing matching the hardwood. The master bedroom has double doors so think about the hall flooring continuing from the bedroom and ending at the nosing or the other way around if I start at the nosing. Given the joist placement, the flooring will run parallel to the nosing. Given that, there will not be a gap available for expansion at that point. The other side of the floor will end on a wall so gapping there will not be an issue. The span will be about 14'. Is it okay having the floor flush up to the nosing this way? Thanks.
 
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Old 05-25-18, 06:06 PM
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Yes, Do the hard math so that when you get to the nosing, you are in the correct position to screw the nosing down and plug the holes. Drill, countersink, and pull plugs from some scraps. Make sure you remove the baseboard molding as that will give you more expansion room, undercut the doors, etc. Assume this is nail down and not floating, but let us know.
 
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Old 05-26-18, 06:42 AM
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Thanks for the thoughts czizzi. Yes, it is a nail down of 3/4" solid or engineered (haven't decided on one or the other just yet). It really shows how little we diyers know: never thought about installing the nosing after the flooring!!

A twist on the question: what if the nosing is already down? I guess I could take it out and reinstall but otherwise, could I start at the nosing side and work back into the room? Are there any issues with this method?

Another question I have is about the wood itself. I have been offered a 5" solid 3/4" red oak floor at a pretty good price. I am a bit leery about buying it as I have read a lot about cupping in wider nail down boards and I don't look forward so much to having to glue and nail. Am I right to worry about 5" boards cupping, etc.? To complicate things, I contacted the manufacturer about the product and they told me they don't make it any longer. I asked why and she said "there wasn't any demand" for it. This seems a bit odd as everywhere you look people are installing wider boards. Thoughts?
 
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Old 05-26-18, 04:37 PM
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Have done 5" oak floating floor over a slab, that one was only 3/8" thick and in 5 years has had no issues. I keep in regular contact with this customer, so I have been able to see what has been going on. So would feel confident with 3/4" thick provided proper floor prep was performed. What is the subfloor made of and how thick is it?

Most stair nosing has a groove in it, and the flooring is nailed through the tongue so setting the nosing first will not work with the rest of the floor unless you insert a spline into the nosing and reverse the installation of the wood.

But as stated, do the math, how will 5" boards hit when you get to the threshold of the room across the hall? Will you be able to bridge that gap easily or will it result in a sliver cut against the walls on both sides. Using boards that are not as wide, gives more leeway to make transitions.
 
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Old 05-26-18, 07:36 PM
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Subfloor is 5/8" plywood over 2x8 joists 16" oc. I had flake board down but it was only 5/8" and not many manufacturers okayed that. Understand your need for a spline to turn the boards around. Will measure things out as you suggest and see how it plays out. Still scared about that 5" flooring...
 

Last edited by edee_em; 05-26-18 at 07:37 PM. Reason: Add info
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Old 05-27-18, 12:00 AM
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5" boards are very common, I have them in my current house.

Only issue with wider boards is you really have to nail them good,

Half the installation force as a typ narrow board.

PS, you will never be able to measure and install to an exact width. Every board goes down a little wider than 5", you simply can not install at a perfect 5" width so do not assume you will hit that location without trimming.
 
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Old 05-27-18, 06:18 AM
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Marq1, thanks for the reply but can you explain this bit a little more for me, please: "...you really have to nail them good, Half the installation force as a typ narrow board."
 
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Old 05-27-18, 10:52 AM
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Typ 2 1/2 boards would have 2 rows of nails in the same area where the 5" will have a single.

I just nail every 6" with the wider planks where the thinner planks can get away with 8" spacing.

As for the increase in width, every row come out 1/32 to 1/16 wide despite really knocking them together, across 20 rows it adds up so just be aware that hitting a dead nuts location is not going to happen and you may need to trim.
 
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