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wondering about using screws to secure top stair nose for new flooring install

wondering about using screws to secure top stair nose for new flooring install

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  #1  
Old 08-25-18, 04:40 PM
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wondering about using screws to secure top stair nose for new flooring install

To use only adhesive, only screws, or both, that is the question.

As part of an installation of engineering wood flooring, I recognized that I need to replace the original stair nose at the top of a stairway so that the new flooring would be flush with nose. [note; the old floor covering was carpet, which simply draped over the original stair nose]. As originally constructed, the stair nose at the top of the stairway was "flush" with the sub floor. With the new hard flooring (as opposed to carpet), I realized I need to somehow raise the nose to make it flush with the new floor surface.

I trimmed off part of the original nose [it's laying on the step in the photo]. I discovered that it was not perfectly flush with the sub-floor but this was not an issue with carpet. To correct this issue and create a flat surface on which to place the new nose piece, I cut some pieces of wood shims and bonded them to the remaining part of the old nose. See attached photo.

The underside of the nose piece only has about 2" of area that will contact the surface on which it lays. I am concerned that using adhesive only might not provide a strong enough bond to assure that the nose would never come lose. And, if that happened, I think it could possibly cause someone to fall by stepping on that nose as they began to descend the stairway. So, I am thinking about using some screws (would choose black screws for appearance). Interested in opinions on this.
 
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Old 08-25-18, 07:46 PM
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Note regarding the photo: a short section of the nose board is shown in the middle of the photo to help visualize the size of the new nose.
 
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Old 08-26-18, 09:10 AM
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I would have installed a landing tread before installing the flooring, not that narrow strip like in your picture.
https://www.woodstairs.com/what-is-landing-tread/
 
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Old 08-26-18, 10:56 AM
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What I have is a Stair Nose Molding (shown at https://www.homedepot.com/p/Zamma-St...2511/203596763) . Is that not the same thing as the product shown on the web page you posted?

I bought that product because it's the same thickness as the flooring.
 
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Old 08-26-18, 11:08 AM
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I agree with Joe, you should probably use solid wood, stained and finished to match the floor, cut the right width to give you the correct amount of nosing hanging over the stair riser below. It will need to be rabbeted to fit over the edge of the subfloor, so the front will be a full 3/4 - 1 1/8" thick, (depending on the wood you use) while the portion that rests on the floor will be cut thinner. It would be secured with glue and finish nails. And if you have a floating floor you would need an expansion joint where the two meet. This is generally a t-molding, but the wood tread could also be rabbeted or dadoed to receive or lap over the laminate floor with just a minimal lip 1/8" tall or so.

the piece you bought doesn't quite look wide enough to provide any nosing. And if the rest of the floor is floating, gluing down the nosing does not allow for any expansion and contraction there.

If you have a floating floor, the only good way to use your existing moulding is to glue it down with PL Polyurethane, leave a space between that moulding and your floor, then place a transition (t-moulding) between the two to cap the seam.
 
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