where to start new flooring

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Old 11-02-18, 09:46 AM
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where to start new flooring

I'm ready to start my first flooring project but I'm a bit stumped on the best location to actually start. Attached is a scaled floor plan, I'll be putting down a floating floor made of laminate planks 6 1/8" by 47 1/4". The planks will be orientated parallel with the right wall. I would like to have this entire floor continuous without any T molding, but I'm a bit concerned about the pinch points at the wall openings and at the end of the kitchen peninsula.

what do you guys think? Will I be alright without T molding at the pinch points? Where would you start laying the flooring and which direction would you go?
 
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Old 11-02-18, 11:09 AM
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I would snap a chalk line parallel to the right wall through the 72" opening. Check the distance to the peninsula to see if it is parallel. If it isn't, you may want to adjust that chalk line (will mean cutting a taper on your first row so that things look straight around the cabinets. Then start in that upper right corner, working left to right.

You shouldn't have any problem with pinch points as long as you fully undercut all your jambs and casing (use an oscillating saw with a wide blade, rest it on a scrap of flooring as you undercut the jambs) and stay away from everything the prescribed amount. The trouble you may have without a transition on the 57" opening is getting everything to line up correctly as you work around the peninsula toward the 57" opening. Plan to put color matched 1/2 x 3/4 baseshoe around everything.

You will need a bullnose transition to cover the cut edge of the floor at the stairs. I would recommend you make that out of solid wood, stained and finished to match... lip it out so that it is 3/16" thick where it lays over the floor.... and maintain your expansion gap where it meets your notch. Glue and nail that piece down. Your floor should be free to slip and slide under the notched part.
 

Last edited by XSleeper; 11-02-18 at 05:31 PM.
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Old 11-02-18, 12:42 PM
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Floating floors can go any direction and personally Id go left to right since the greatest distance of view is front to back!
 
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Old 11-02-18, 12:57 PM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
I would snap a chalk line parallel to the right wall through the 72" opening. Check the distance to the peninsula to see if it is parallel. If it isn't, you may want to adjust that chalk line (will mean cutting a taper on your first row so that things look straight around the cabinets. Then start in that upper right corner, working left to right.

You shouldn't have any problem with pinch points as long as you fully undercut all your jambs and casing (use an oscillating saw with a wide blade, rest it on a scrap of flooring as you undercut the jambs) and stay away from everything the prescribed amount. The trouble you may have without a transition on the 57" opening is getting everything to line up correctly as you work around the peninsula toward the 57" opening. Plan to put color matched 1/2 x 3/4 baseshoe around everything.

You will need a bullnose transition to cover the cut edge of the floor at the stairs. I would recommend you make that out of solid wood, stained and finished to match... lip it out so that it is 3/16" thick where it lays over the floor.... and maintain your expansion gap where it meets your notch. Glue and nail that piece down. Your floor should be free to slip and slide under the notched part.
are you talking about the upper right hand corner of the peninsula then working toward the right wall?
 
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Old 11-02-18, 02:43 PM
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I think there's a little more information I forgot to add. The kitchen area and the left side of the peninsula will have the most traffic and the flooring here at the walls/cabinets will be the most visible. I would say it's most important that the flooring looks square here, compared to anywhere else. The right side of the peninsula has a large counter top overhang for seating. The top right "room" is the dining room which won't get used much. The bottom right room is the living room and you aren't going to see where the floor meets the walls in many locations because of all the furniture. The floor edges will be pretty visible in the foyer.
 
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Old 11-02-18, 04:17 PM
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floating floor made of laminate planks
Actually I was waiting for somebody else to jump on this but will give my opinion.

Skip the laminate material, despite what is shown on TV in real life its krap, spend a little more on real or engineered wood and you will not be disappointed.
 
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Old 11-02-18, 05:32 PM
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The upper right hand corner of your picture. You mentioned you are running the flooring parallel to the wall on the right... and I mentioned snapping a chalk line next to that wall... that chalk line will represent the front of your very first row. Adjust it as needed to be parallel to the cabinets.... then taper that first row that is next to the far right row as needed.
 
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