Before I begin (Hardwood Install)

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Old 11-28-18, 07:45 AM
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Before I begin (Hardwood Install)

So I have never laid down hardwood flooring but am pretty handy and worked in a wood shop for many years in my younger life. I just bought some skipped planed ash flooring from the local lumber mill in town that is going to go great in my house with the exposed barn beams. There is 3 different widths just because I thought it would look cool, 2.5", 4" and 6". Since i have never done this before but have watched and read many videos and forums I feel pretty confident that I can do this but i still have questions since there always seems to be a little variety in peoples answers.

I am putting the flooring on the second floor but most of it is over a finished unheated garage. Do I need to put down a vapor barrier or retardant? If so what is a good quality product?

What is the best glue I should be using?

Do the boards need to be running perpendicular to my joists? I feel like it would flow better in the room if they ran parallel but I want to make sure the job is done correctly without any issues in the future.

Thanks for the info and if there are any websites that I can be looking at please suggest them as well.

Thanks!
 
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Old 11-28-18, 08:15 AM
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Im going to assume you have a insulation in the floor and that most likely has a vapor barrier so you should be good.

Flooring, with the exception of laminate, should always go perpendicular to joists.

Never done glue down so will defer to others!
 
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Old 11-28-18, 03:42 PM
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Nail down or floating is the preferred method of installation. A 15# felt paper under the flooring for noise suppression and squeak prevention. If floating, a 3 in 1 underlayment is required. Perpendicular to the joists will give you a stronger floor.

What is your subfloor made of? How thick?

Must remove baseboard moldings, and prepare to undercut door jambs and casings. Need to plan your install very carefully so that when you come to obstacles such as closets, walls and doorwas, you don't end up with a sliver cut on your flooring.
 
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Old 11-28-18, 06:28 PM
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Is this flooring T & G?
Where they all jointed to be the exact same width?
 
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Old 11-29-18, 06:48 AM
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Yes they are tongue and groove boards and they are multiple widths. Do you think 16 or 18 gauge nails would be best?
 
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Old 11-29-18, 07:02 AM
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czizzi

So you are saying I should not use glue with the wider sized planks? What size nail would be best for ash flooring? Subfloor is 3/4 inch plywood of 16 on center joists.
 
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Old 11-29-18, 07:17 AM
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Should use the flooring cleats!
 
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Old 11-29-18, 07:21 AM
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Agreed a floor nailer is best although I have put down small amounts of flooring use my 16 guage nailer with 2" nails. Not sure an 18 gauge nail would offer much holding power.
 
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Old 11-29-18, 08:52 AM
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Sorry, I don't know all the flooring lingo . I was going to use the flooring cleats at 2 inch length but wasn't sure if i should be using a 16 or 18 gauge. Some people say the 16 gauge can cause the tongue to splinter.

Thanks for the help!
 
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Old 11-29-18, 01:06 PM
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I'm not sure what diameter the cleats are for a floor nailer but it most certainly isn't 18 gauge. They aren't the same type of nails used by a finish nail gun.
 
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Old 11-29-18, 04:29 PM
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As far as I know the cleats come in different lengths, 1 1/2 to 2 but have never seen them in different gauge or thicknesses.
 
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Old 11-29-18, 07:38 PM
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There are a select number of hardwood laminates that recommend you nail through the groove as opposed to the tongue. If yours is one, then follow that direction. For all others, you nail with cleats through the tongue at an angle into the subfloor. Glue is never recommended in these situations. If concerned with your wider boards, nail cleats more frequently. In my experience, that is not needed.
 
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Old 12-11-18, 08:23 AM
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One last question as I am about to begin laying the flooring this week. I ripped up the carpet and the particle board to expose my sub floor. I immediately noticed a draft coming up in the joints of my sub floor and I was wondering if I should caulk these gaps to eliminate the draft? Like I said it is over a finished unheated garage. Not sure if the felt paper is enough of a barrier to stop the air leaks. Please let me know...thanks again!
 
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Old 12-11-18, 08:27 AM
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The felt should be enough. What is on the ceiling below? that is where the draft and insulation issues should be addressed.
 
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Old 12-11-18, 08:52 AM
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If concerned with your wider boards, nail cleats more frequently.
Having learned the hard way after installing 6" wide flooring found that the recommended spacing is 5-6" vs 8-10" spacing for narrow boards.

eliminate the draft
Would agree, if you feel a draft you have an air infiltration issue that needs to be fixed beyond the flooring!
 
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Old 12-11-18, 09:33 AM
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the ceiling below is sheetrock, i will check again when I get home if it was a draft of just the wood feeling cold, it has been in the teens up here in the northeast so maybe I am mistaken.
 
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Old 12-14-18, 09:15 PM
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Lay down and staple 15# felt paper. Buy or rent a flooring nailer and use L cleats, 16 or 18 gauge cleats. Install flooring perpendicular to the floor joists with properly secured 3/4 or better plywood or OSB. If you need to reverse direction use a slip tongue. Pull all the base molding and leave a gap at the edges, 1/4". Place all your flooring in the space for at least two days prior to installing so it can acclimate to the space. No glue needed.
 
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Old 01-02-19, 05:17 AM
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So i just go finished laying my floor and I am surprising happy with how it turned out since it was my first time laying hardwood. Now I am on to the sanding, staining and finish aspect.

Since this a skipped planed ash I wanted to stain it a medium brown color like the photo I attached. Any recommendations on a brand and color stain? I know the saw marks will come out darker so I don't want the whole board to be a dark stain.

Finally, is there really any other option than Bona Traffic HD when it comes to a quality finish? I know it is a little pricey but if it is a lot better than the rest I will definitely spend the extra.

Suggestions are really appreciated!!!

Thanks!
 
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Old 01-02-19, 09:11 AM
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It's always a good idea to stain some scrap boards first - gives you a better idea of what the finished floor will look like. Better to stain multiple scrap boards with different stains than put the wrong stain on the floor.
 
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