Few questions regarding 3/4" oak install

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Old 12-22-18, 11:57 PM
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Few questions regarding 3/4" oak install

Hey experts, I'm in the middle of a small flooring job and wanted some opinions before proceeding. I have refinished a few hardwood floors, and installed a few laminate floors, but this is my first hardwood install. I've almost finished racking the room, and before anything is fastened, I decided to pump the brakes and make sure I visited this site.

I recently had the carpet replaced, and I'm wondering if they went a bit too far with the carpet for my transition. It's pretty much too late to fix if I botched this part, as the cuts on the opposite wall have all been made...but should I have cut back the carpet a bit and extended the flooring more towards the door jam, or do you think it will look fine once the transition strip is down?

Secondly, even though at first glance it seems like overkill, everything I read online and the manufacture recommended a 3/4" gap at the walls. The drywall was not placed high enough to allow expansion underneath so that I could measure to the studs, so it's gapped to the drywall. Where in the world do you find trim thick enough to cover that gap? Even with shoe moulding I'm worried that I may see gaps.


Once I've completely racked the flooring and I'm happy with the layout, do you have any suggestions for intelligently/efficiently taking the flooring back up in order to nail the floor down without creating a cluster #[email protected]! and losing my layout?



Lastly, and this is another 'too late now' question, I decided on Somerset prefinished, and it wasn't cheap...to say the least. I figured you get what you pay for, right? So how upset should I be that more than a few boards showed defects from their staining process. I was able to hide a few of these in the closet, but there were many like this...my opinion, any more than zero is a problem. I don't expect real wood to be perfect, but this isn't the wood, this is their process, and the lack of quality control bothers me. Is this pretty much expected regardless of manufacturer, or should I raise a stink with the vendor?


Thanks!
 
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Old 12-23-18, 02:07 AM
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First, yes there should be a threshold piece installed in the door to provide a clean break to the carpet,

https://www.doityourself.com/forum/a...1&d=1545556011

For the gaps, I use 3/8" shims to provide the correct spacing for shoe/qtr molding.

If that gap is too great you need to shift the planks and start with a half piece so you will finish with aprox a half piece.

Honestly I never lay out the entire room, just set up the starter pieces based on measurements and install.

Stain, have never had any issues, maybe some bad boards but there is always a piece or two, just trim off the bad spot and work it into the floor.
 
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Old 12-23-18, 09:52 AM
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Hey Marq1, thanks for the reply.

I wasn't planning on using a plank for the transition, but rather a transition strip...something like this that I can stain to match.


I may change my mind though, as your example does look very clean...my only concern is messing up the carpet, a mistake there would be no fixing.

You bring up something I've been wondering about though. Every install guide warns about buckling due to expansion like it's the plague, yet I see installs like your pic above all the time, including in my own home on the first floor...how doesn't that create a problem with expansion?
 
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Old 12-23-18, 10:41 AM
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Buckling isn't normally an issue at the end of the boards, it's more of an issue when the sides are too close to the wall. Wood tends to expand/contract over the width not the length.
 
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Old 12-23-18, 03:41 PM
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buckling due to expansion like it's the plague
So that brings up a slightly painful experience.

The floor you see was installed last winter, and by summer it had literally pulled itself off the floor requiring a complete reinstall.

The lesson learned, last fall was very cool and dry, the flooring was acclimated but when the warm humid summer came, it swelled and buckled.

A big contributor was the wide planks, every floor that I have installed was 2 1/2" boards, this was 6", and now I understand they require different installation techniques.

Bottom line I will never install this type of floor other than during the summer when it's warm and humid.

Since reinstalling, no issues, but this winter I can definitely "hear" the difference when the humidifier was turned on and some moisture in the air!
 
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Old 12-23-18, 06:31 PM
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Oh that sucks! Here I am installing in the dead of winter in Wisconsin, so it's bone dry now, but will be very humid 6 months from now. It's variable width, as you see in the pics, with the widest planks at 4". Now I'm glad I went with the full 3/4 gap along all 4 walls...fingers crossed! I'm going to wait another week before nailing it down to make sure it's acclimated. I read somewhere that the biggest concern is the moisture delta between the subfloor and the flooring, which causes one to move much more than the other...does that ring true based on your experience?
 
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Old 12-23-18, 06:40 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
Buckling isn't normally an issue at the end of the boards, it's more of an issue when the sides are too close to the wall. Wood tends to expand/contract over the width not the length.
Is that true regardless of the cut? ie. flat, quarter, plain sawn, etc?

BTW, marksr, you also helped walk me through that drywall salvage project I did...you're all over the place! Are you one of those renaissance guys who can do it all? Either way, I definitely appreciate your help, again. That goes for both of you. With any luck I'll have some success photos to share later...if not, I'll have some great "don't be this guy" photos instead
 
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Old 12-24-18, 12:33 AM
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moisture delta between the subfloor and the flooring, which causes one to move much more than the other
I dont believe so, the wood was sitting in the house for almost 5 weeks before I started around Thanksgiving so everything would have had the same moisture content.

This was first time with wide planks, every other jobs was narrow planks, some done in the winter. and had no issues.

The gaps around the perimeter had nothing to do with it, it was across the entire floor.

I would at a min get the humidifier cranked up!.
 
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Old 12-24-18, 03:51 AM
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marksr, you also helped walk me through that drywall salvage project I did...you're all over the place! Are you one of those renaissance guys who can do it all?
I wouldn't go that far, I'm just a poor boy that learned long ago that it's cheaper to diy than hire someone plus there is a lot of pride and satisfaction in having done it yourself. I only have a few small rms with hardwood [done at different times] and have long ago forgotten what time of yr I put them down.
 
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