Not sure what to do next... help.

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-25-19, 09:56 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 156
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Not sure what to do next... help.

Hello DIY Community! I wanted to scuff my wood floors just a little bit, so I can apply new poly. However, I guess since not all the pieces are even, I was sanding away the color of the corners of some raised pieces. Here's an example:

Name:  woodfloor3.jpg
Views: 86
Size:  188.4 KB

The problem is I don't know what I'm looking at since I don't know what the previous owners did. And I don't know how to tell if it's hardwood or laminate. For those of you who are experienced, can you tell what's my situation with the picture?

A. Did I simply remove a top level stain?

Or.

B. Did I actually remove the real color of the wood?

What will happen when I apply new poly? Will the white spot go away and the natural colors come back? Or will it continue to have this discoloration? Do I get a stain that's close to my color, then spot stain it, then apply poly after? I'm hoping you guys don't tell me I have to sand my entire floor white now. LOL! But I'll take the truth.

Here's another wider picture showing how other pieces are affected as well.

Name:  woodfloor2.jpg
Views: 83
Size:  88.1 KB
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-25-19, 10:07 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,796
Received 285 Votes on 261 Posts
Looks like real oak, or at least an engineered wood veneer floor, judging by the beveled edges. You sanded through the finish (might have been a factory applied aluminum oxide finish) and into the wood, removing the stain in the process. You will want to lightly rub on just a little stain before you try to poly. I would recommend a little can of Minwax "special walnut" or if you think it has just a hint of red in the brown, try "Provincial." Either would be really close. Wipe it on... then with a clean cloth, wipe off all the excess. The color will remain.

Its pointless to do this at this point but to get a feel for what it will look like without stain and with just poly, wipe it with a rag and paint thinner to see what it will look like wet. It might be a good idea to do this on the entire floor anyway... you should use a tack cloth (clean rag that doesn't leave lint behind that you have made damp with paint thinner) to pick up any dust before you apply your poly.

You will want to allow a good 8 hrs or so after you stain before applying any poly. Then you LIGHTLY and quickly scuff sand the floor with 220 grit, then clean the dust again with a clean tack cloth before applying another coat of poly. You always sand lightly between coats. Apply the poly as thin as you can, keep a wet edge as you apply it, work quickly and don't over work it.
 
  #3  
Old 04-25-19, 11:25 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 156
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you XSleeper! Will follow your instructions as closely as possible.
 
  #4  
Old 04-25-19, 11:58 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 156
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
BTW, is Acetone and Paint thinner the same thing?
 
  #5  
Old 04-26-19, 12:45 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 4,813
Received 142 Votes on 132 Posts
Before doing anything you really need to identify beyond a doubt what your working with or you may create a bigger mess.

Somewhere, like a air duct opening, or by removing a trim piece, or a baseboard shoe/qtr round, you need to be able to see the side of the product to confirm!

Assuming it's wood and you actually went through the finish you now have stained wood under the original finish and areas that have been sanded that your going to attempt to re-stain, meaning the colors may not match and the entire floor may need to be sanded to stain evenly.

If its laminate it may be a loss!
 
  #6  
Old 04-26-19, 04:06 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,424
Received 156 Votes on 138 Posts
Acetone is a hot thinner/solvent, paint thinner is normally mineral spirits or naptha.

It looks like you did more than a scuff sand. When touching up stain you are often better using a stain that is a shade lighter than the same stain originally used. For some reason those bare areas are often prone to stain a little darker.
 
  #7  
Old 04-26-19, 05:58 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,796
Received 285 Votes on 261 Posts
Definitely do NOT use acetone!!!
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: