Help, replacing flooring in 1970's house

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Old 01-15-20, 07:36 PM
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Help, replacing flooring in 1970's house

I'd like some help with info so I can make the right choice, I'm replacing all the flooring throughout my newly purchased 1970's house. I've removed pet stained carpet from 3 bedrooms, a hallway and a 14 step staircase, then of course the zillion staples left behind. Next was a tile floor in the kitchen, the large 16x18 pieces were tough to break up and led to a surprise layer of awesome mustard color linoleum. I finally have everything gone and I'm down to the plywood subfloor in every room. I bought laminate flooring from LL, hired installers and wasted 2 days with them saying they didn't know why but the pieces would not stay together. Bottom line, the floor is not level. I'm now going to install 3/4 x solid hardwood; I've been told I can simply install it to the subfloor, I've heard I need to apply a primer before a floor leveling compound followed by the hardwood flooring, lastly that I can skip the primer and go to the leveling compound and flooring. I clearly want to do this right so I'm asking for advice or ideas on what would be the correct steps to take for the best outcome.

Thank you in advance
 
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Old 01-15-20, 08:02 PM
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A few questions...

you say the subfloor is "plywood". How thick is the plywood subfloor?

And you do know what particle board is, dont you? I hope the subfloor isn't particle board... it was popular in the 70s. It's not suitable for anything other than the dumpster (total tearout).

you say the subfloor isn't level. (And you mean FLAT... it doesn't have to be level.) How bad is it? Because if you are installing a 3/4" wood floor, your installation instructions will tell you how much variation the floor can tolerate. (Such as ~3/16" in 8ft radius)

It's hard to give any recommendations sight unseen, since every subfloor is different in how you might go about preparing it. Some subfloor issues may be structural, so without knowing how bad the subfloor is, where it's bad, why its bad, etc... it's hard to give advice.

and I hope your linoleum didnt contain asbestos.
 
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Old 01-15-20, 08:41 PM
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Hi and thanks for responding.

1. Yes I know what plywood is, and it's 3/4 thick.
2. No it's not partical board.
3. The plywood subfloor which isn't flat can tolerate a variation up to 3/16" in 10ft radius
4. The subfloor is not in poor condition, it's solid and has no areas where it sinks when one walks on it. It was only found to not be flat after a second expert came to try and determine the problem.
5. No the linoleum did not have asbestos, it was paper backed

So what I am interested in hearing about is does a primer need to be painted on the plywood before putting down the leveling compound; or can one use a leveling compound directly on the plywood. Lastly is there a preferred leveling compound for use with plywood and hardwood flooring?

Again, thank you for your time.
 

Last edited by pdstorace; 01-15-20 at 08:49 PM. Reason: Didn't respond to one question
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Old 01-15-20, 08:56 PM
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Your questions could have many answers, since much of that comes down to personal preference.

Whether or not you need a primer depends on the application instructions on the product you choose to use as your floor leveler. Personally I would not suggest you use anything that is cement based or that advertises itself as "self leveling". Instead, I'd use something that is acrylic and that remains flexible... such as Dap Flexible Floor Patch & Leveller. Apply it with a trowel or drywall knife after you outline the areas that need it, putting on roughly 1/8" at a time... too thick and it will have a hard time curing. It's not a fast dry product but it works well if you have just a few dips that need filling.
 
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Old 01-16-20, 03:31 AM
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If the pet stains soaked into the subfloor I would coat those areas with a solvent based primer to insure the urine odor won't return.
 
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Old 01-16-20, 08:06 AM
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before putting down the leveling compound
You mention leveling compound but have not elaborated what this is.

If your 3/4" wood your installing is nail down you have to be very careful that the pour down leveling compounds are compatible with nail down construction.

IMO there are better ways to manage level issues, felt paper all the way to shingles.
 
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Old 01-16-20, 09:09 AM
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Hi Marksr,

Thanks for responding, I already "painted" the floor and 2 feet up the walls with Kilz to be sure to cover any cat spray. That was a worry so took care of it, thanks.
 

Last edited by pdstorace; 01-16-20 at 09:15 AM. Reason: noted in wrong location
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Old 01-16-20, 02:58 PM
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Oil base Kilz, correct? I wouldn't trust latex Kilz to seal it long term.
 
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