Bathroom Hardwood to Tile Remodel

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Old 11-12-20, 08:42 AM
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Bathroom Hardwood to Tile Remodel

We've decided to install a new toilet in our main bathroom, which has also lead to "Well honey while your at it why don't you replace the flooring as well."

So here's the task, we currently have Hardwood flooring from our kitchen that runs into the bathroom as well. The boards are perpendicular to the door. I am trying to figure out the best method of cutting a straight line in the doorframe to transition from hardwood to tile. My first thought was a circular saw cut to the correct depth (on wood subfloor) but the saw will obviously come up short when it runs into the doorframe on each side. I'm looking for any suggestions to make a nice clean straight cut for a smooth transition from the wood in the kitchen to the newly installed tile in the bathroom.

Thanks everyone!

 
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Old 11-12-20, 09:32 AM
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I would remove the door and it's jamb which will give you a little more room. Then I'd use a circular saw with a fine tooth blade like you mentioned for the bulk of the cut. Then use an oscillating saw to finish the ends of the cut. You could also use a reciprocating saw for the ends but it's harder to control and do a nice cut.

Don't forget that it is not good to install tile over wood. Plan on installing a tile backer product like cement board or Hardie Backer on top of the bathroom subfloor before tiling. Also make sure your bathroom's subfloor is thick enough and stiff enough for tile. Tile is less forgiving than wood and any flexing can cause cracked tile or grout joints.
 
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Old 11-12-20, 10:01 AM
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Thanks for the tips, I didn't think about that. How would you go about accounting for the height differential between the wood and the tile. I suspect the addition of a 1/2" cement board will cause some issues in that area.
 
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Old 11-12-20, 11:34 AM
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If height is a concern then I would use 1/4" Hardie Backer if you are concerned about the thickness. The cement board or Hardie is not there for floor strength. It is a masonry material that the thinset will bond well with.
 
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Old 11-12-20, 04:24 PM
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Best option would be to remove the wood floor, but I fully understand that is difficult! I would make the cut just outside the jam, install a lime stone, or your preference of matl inside the door jamb then tile in the bathroom.

That will eliminate any height differences, allow you to make an easier cut that would then butt against the threshold!
 
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Old 11-14-20, 04:26 PM
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So the plan is to cut a straight line between those screwdrivers. Remove all the 3/4 hardwood, install 1/2Ē HardieBacker, then install 1/4Ē tile on top of that, wait, grout, install toilet. (Should I go with 1/4Ē Cement board to account for thinset or is that pretty negligible, the hardwood is 3/4Ē)

I could use a few more suggestions on the transition from wood to tile. I would love to keep it flat without having to use any sort of reducer/transition piece that creates any sort of hump. Iím concerned that butting perpendicular wood to tile might not work or look well. Thatís even assuming I get a nice clean unsplittered cut... I also read somewhere that you should use caulk instead of grout on the transition.
 

Last edited by Jwolfe1987; 11-14-20 at 05:03 PM.
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Old 11-14-20, 05:32 PM
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This is the sort of thing that Schlueter Reno-T is made for.
 
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Old 11-15-20, 03:15 PM
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The cut went very well and Iím leaning towards just using a matching caulk between the wood and tile. I have removed everything and found lineoleum under the hardwood. I pulled that too because i knew there was some water issues near the toilet.

Need some suggestions on preparing the subfloor for HardieBacker. You can see in the picture that there is water damage near the toilet. How do I go about replacing that? I donít see any screws for the subfloor... with the size of the room Iíd be tempted to just replace the whole of it. It wouldnít even take a full sheet. I consider myself competent but I am very much a rookie when it comes to construction.

Final note, before realizing I probably need to replace the subfloor I bought 1/4Ē hardie and have 1/4Ē tile. Iím expecting the two layers of mortar (under the board and under the tile) to get me to 3/4Ē to match the hardwood. Sound right?


 
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Old 11-15-20, 03:43 PM
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Can you post a picture looking closer at the toilet flange and the floor in that area. From your photo the toilet flange looks suspect but it could just be the picture.

Take a screwdriver and poke at the floor around the toilet flange and then jab the screwdriver into the subfloor in an area that wasn't water damaged. That will give you an idea what water damaged wood feels like but the screwdriver will penetrate further in rotten wood. If the wood is at all soft around the toilet flange now is the time to replace the subflooring.

Remove the base molding. That will make it a lot easier to drop your sheets of tile backer into position and the base molding will have to be moved with the new finished flooring height.

Also, I would go ahead and remove the vanity if you are up to it. After disconnecting the plumbing inside the top can be popped free. Usually it's only held on with caulk between it and the cabinet. There is usually only a few screws or nails holding the cabinet in place. I remove any fasteners I can see then pull/lift on the cabinet to feel for any fasteners I missed. Then you can lift the cabinet out whole and have a nice open floor to work with. That will make it easier because your tile backer and tile can run under the vanity so you won't have to trim the tile to fit up next to the vanity. And, in the future if you decide to switch out the vanity you can make the change without having to redo the floor.
 
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Old 11-15-20, 04:01 PM
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Certainly adds more work to a project thatís getting longer lol but I like your idea about the vanity. I assume the vanity would then just sit right on top of the tile. No need for Quarter round, just caulk the edge?
 
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Old 11-15-20, 04:57 PM
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I would probably set the vanity on top of the cement board and tile around the vanity.

And it almost looks to me that your rotten osb may be an underlayment layer on top of another subfloor... in the photos, it appears that you can see the edge of the osb butting up to the side of the bottom plate. This would be very good news. If you have a floor vent, remove it and see if you can see a cross section of the subfloor. Or clean out the crap around the toilet flange and see if you can see the layers.

Possibly you can get away with just removing/replacing all the OSB if there is a subfloor underneath it that is still intact.
 
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Old 11-15-20, 06:21 PM
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XSleeper I think youíre right. It does appear to be an underlayment. Might just set my circular saw at 1/4Ē and cut on the rot and pull it up. Itís all glued so Iím hoping to only remove the rotted wood.
 
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Old 11-15-20, 06:28 PM
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There ya go! ......

That flange looks pretty rusty and thin... hope you're replacing it.
 
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Old 11-16-20, 06:06 AM
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Yes, those toilet flanges with a stamped sheet metal ring can have a short life. It looks like the toilet flange should be replaced. Which isn't so bad if you're already pulling up the floor sheeting.

I should have been clear about tiling under the vanity. Yes, you can tile and grout the whole way if you happen to have the tile lying around. I normally put tile backer under the entire room then tile at least a few inches under the vanity. I also save my cut tile scraps and set them around the back and side wall as spacers to support the vanity. The bit of tile under the vanity means you don't have to cut or trim tile to match up to the vanity and it leaves some wiggle room in case you get a new vanity in the future that is a slightly different size.
 
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Old 11-16-20, 06:30 AM
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It’s all glued so I’m hoping to only remove the rotted wood.It’s all glued so I’m hoping to only remove the rotted wood.
Underlayment should never be glued to the subfloor! You are about to find out why.
 
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Old 11-16-20, 07:23 AM
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I appreciate all your help. When I get home from work I'll be cutting a square section of the rotten OSB then start pulling it back. I expect it to be a nightmare. Probably use the multi tool to remove chunks of glue and board then a sander to flatten everything out before replacing with new 1/4" OSB. And yes I will be replacing the toilet flange as well. A simple change in toilets has turned in to something!

I'm also not looking forward to removing all of that leftover linoleum paper. Any tips on that? I assume that has to go so that I have a solid surface for the mortar before laying the Hardiebacker.

Pilot Dane - I may just tile all the way under if I remove the Vanity. We only needed about 20 Square feet of Tile but the boxes come in 15 so I have an extra 10 square feet that could easily fill that space. I noticed in my bathroom upstairs that they ran the tile up the vanity at the bottom, filling in the few inches below the cupboard space. If I feel inclined I may do the same.
 
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Old 11-16-20, 06:19 PM
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Things have taken another turn for the worse.
 
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Old 11-16-20, 06:21 PM
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Aw geez, is that particle board?
 
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Old 11-16-20, 07:20 PM
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I think itís 3/4 OSB. Now the process of finding the nearest joist past all the rot.
 

Last edited by Jwolfe1987; 11-16-20 at 10:11 PM.
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Old 11-22-20, 11:10 AM
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The good news is I have a solid floor in. Iím not entirely pleased with my underlayment OSB cut. I was off to the left for some reason on my measurements. But hereís the real issue - I used an oatey replacement ring under the toilet flange. The spacers I have to go on top of the flange donít sit flush because where the metal ring overlaps it is higher AND and oatey spacers are the opposite direction of the oatey ring... what the heck.


 
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Old 11-22-20, 11:45 AM
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Thats good. Looks your joists must run right / left as you look into the bathroom, so you oriented the plywood correctly. But the screws in your flange are too small... hope you plan to replace those with larger bugle headed wood screws.

And dont quote me, but I think that if you intend to use a spacer, you should have replaced your flange completely with a new one... the new one could have sat right on top of your completed subfloor.

About all you can do now is put your PVC spacer on bottom, (clean and sand the existing flange then silicone it to the existing flange.) Offset the screws so they don't interfere... ( the slots in the pvc flange don't matter, you can even turn them 90 degrees)then put the metal ring on top, predrill holes through the pvc and use the larger screws.
 
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Old 11-22-20, 12:18 PM
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Yes I was going to get larger screws. I actually have access to the plumbing still through the basement. But I donít have a clue how to replace the whole flange.
 
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Old 11-22-20, 12:27 PM
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Yeah, it doesn't appear easy. You would need to replace all those elbows in that photo. I would need to see more of the plumbing to have a clue... maybe back up and snap one more photo. Its nice you have access from below. I would definitely replace it... there isn't anything holding your plumbing right now but the glue joints.

Your goal would be to use one like this.
 
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Old 11-22-20, 12:48 PM
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Had another thought. Correct me if this wonít be stable enough but Iíve thought about getting new 1/4Ē and cutting it to match the plywood. The spacer would set inside the current flange and screw in on top of the two layers of flooring.

 
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Old 11-22-20, 01:16 PM
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Yes, that would help somewhat. But ideally, your original flange pictured in post 22 should have subfloor under it. Right now, if you step on it, all that weight is being put on the pipe and the pipe hanger pictured in post 24. But in order to do that you would have to replace a lot of fittings. So I'm guessing you probably don't want to get into that.
 
 

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