Looking for opinions on where to start install


  #1  
Old 11-07-22, 03:55 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 23
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Looking for opinions on where to start install

Hi,

I have a small hardwood flooring install on the horizon, but I'm struggling to plan the install.

My original plan was to start along the bottom rail (in red). The hardwood is prefinished with a beveled edge, so I don't want to have to rip any boards to fit against this as there won't be any trim here to hide the cut edge and I'm worried about the appearance. I would have to place the groove edge against this and work away from the bottom rail. That idea seems well enough right up until I start thinking about fitting the bullnose piece (in blue).



The bullnose piece is cut to accept the tongue side of the flooring as shown in the example below. If I go with the plan above, I would be mating it with the groove side instead...is that ok? I'll probably have to rip the bullnose piece to the correct width anyways.



If there are better ways to go about this, I'm all ears!

Thanks for reading and let me know if I failed to explain, I can elaborate where needed.

Edit: One more question...first time installing bullnose like this. Do you glue it, or counter sink nails and just wood fill to hide?
 

Last edited by DividedRy; 11-07-22 at 03:57 PM. Reason: Adding additional question...
  #2  
Old 11-08-22, 12:37 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 9,935
Received 1,052 Likes on 954 Posts
So you have two features your trying to meet, the bull nose and the trim board where the balusters sit. Chances of them all aligning up is slim, one or the other will most likely have to be ripped to fit.

No problem that's the fun of installing floors.

For the bull nose going grove to grove is just the use of a spline to fill both grooves.

It would just be face nailed into the sub floor.

The another aspect you need to consider, how do all the boards stack up across the hall. That needs to be looked at so the start and finish strips are the same width.

Ripping the flooring along the baluster trim board is not a problem, you just have to rip to width, rip the bevel (if needed) sand and re-stain, a common installation.

Oh, and final item. Don't use wood fillers, get a wax pencil to match, makes those nail holes disappear!
 
The following users liked this post:
  #3  
Old 11-08-22, 09:00 AM
sam floor's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: May 2010
Location: floor installer
Posts: 1,087
Received 29 Likes on 24 Posts
Follow Marq's advice. He covered it all.
 
The following users liked this post:
  #4  
Old 11-08-22, 05:04 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 23
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks, gents!! I think I'll go with the edge to edge spline approach. As Marq mentioned, the bull nose will need to be ripped anyways, barring a miracle, so routing a groove should be no problem.

I plan to address the strip width at the opposite ends of the hall just via layout...the boards come in 3 widths (example from previous job below) so with a little bit of Tetris playing I'm hoping to find a pattern that fits just about right.



Oh yeah, one more question. Do you think underlayment is necessary here? 2nd floor, so no moisture issues and the sub is cork...not perfectly level in all places, but close.

As always, thank you for the advice! Marq, I think you've helped on just about every thread I've started, this diy hack greatly appreciates your continued contributions, cheers!
 
  #5  
Old 11-09-22, 12:41 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 9,935
Received 1,052 Likes on 954 Posts
This is a second floor so your totally inside the conditioned living space so there would be no moister to deal with, does it help with sound transmission of leveling of uneven floors, maybe, but any benefits are miniscule!

For leveling, pieces of roofing felt all the way up to shingles are easy and cheap.
 
  #6  
Old 11-15-22, 02:12 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 23
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks, Marq! So I failed bigly on my original 'plan', not sure what I was thinking. If I drank I would at least have an excuse...

So there is a really ugly lip that was at one point covered by carpeting. I created a riser to cover the busted plaster behind, but I made it to fit under the lip, leaving the lip completely exposed and visible...how I didn't consider this before wasting the wood and time I'll never know.





My only idea, which I'm looking for opinions on, would be to saw off that lip (once I figure out how to get those nails out) so that the sub floor is flush with the plaster underneath, then create a new riser board in the shape below that would hide everything. I'm not sure I have many other good options, but that's where you come in Would your approach be the same?




 

Last edited by DividedRy; 11-15-22 at 02:42 PM.
  #7  
Old 11-15-22, 04:19 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 9,935
Received 1,052 Likes on 954 Posts
Sometimes you can only look forward so far. It's only one step so nothing that cant be fixed.

I think your approach is exactly what needs to be done, the only suggestion would be to trim it out something like this, it will give the existing trim something to butt up against and eliminate that long thin section.


 
  #8  
Old 11-15-22, 04:59 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: United States
Posts: 23
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Yeah, I think you're right. I had actually considered extending the right side out as you've diagramed as to sit on top of that 45 degree trim, but was worried about making the panhandle too big as it will protrude out a bit more from the wall than the trim piece that's out of view on the right. It will probably look just fine once finished.

As always, many thanks!
 
  #9  
Old 11-15-22, 11:37 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 9,935
Received 1,052 Likes on 954 Posts
It's the view of a project where every detail seems to be critical and few months from now it's all kind of forgotten.

I think having the stair riser there so the trim is not ending in space will give it a more finished look.
 
The following users liked this post:
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: