Bathroom Floor


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Old 05-12-23, 08:48 AM
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Bathroom Floor

You can see my posts in the Plumbing Forum concerning a toilet flange that was raised above the floor by half an inch. I have decided to just leave it raised up. and take out the Tile, rock agregate tile support and the half inch plywood subfloor. I would like to put in a new subfloor in the entire space (which will be less than 6X8') If I replace the 1/2" Plywood that is already there I have choice of either putting in a piece of thicker plywood 3/4" and putting in a half inch thick piece (s) of cement board on top of lt or using the half inch original plywood (new board) and putting in a 3/4th inch thick piece of Advantech board. I have heard that there is a tile available that interlocks like a jigsaw puzzle that does not require all the tile cutting tools and seam joint grouting that ceramic tile does. Any advice on replacing this floor is welcome! (I have a plywood spacer that I made 25 years ago to bridge the gap between the tile floor and and the toilet base that has remained unbelievably solid (It hid the leak from view until the floor caved in below it lol)
 
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Old 05-12-23, 10:41 AM
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I would work it out so the top layer is all one continuous sheet without seams if possible. That will help insure the flattest, smoothest base for your new flooring. If you can't do that then the specific materials and what's on top of what doesn't matter so much. It's that top surface you need to be concerned about and keeping it smooth and flat.

If you are going to do anything other than tile (carpet, vinyl, snap together flooring, hardwood...) I would make the top layer Advantech. If you are considering anything (tile) that gets mortared or thinset in place then I would use cement board or Hardie Backer as the top layer.
 
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Old 05-12-23, 11:56 AM
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Thanks Dane,
There is going to have to be a seam somewhere, since everything I have to buy is going to be in 4X8 sheets from what I have seen so far. I think I know where that will be based on the the 2X10 floor joists I have seen intersecting so far. The Advantech is the right thickness to raise what will be the actual pre flooring base to what is there now without me having to take out ALL of the half in plywood that is under everything right now. Have a great day!
 
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Old 05-12-23, 01:03 PM
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After you get the Advantech down I like the get something sorta long and straight like a level. I set it on the floor and slide it around. If it catches on a seam or rocks on a high spot I sand the high part down. If you see gaps of light underneath you may need some filler.
 
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Old 05-12-23, 01:13 PM
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10-4 on sanding down the high spot or using filler on the low ones. I called the local Lowes concerning the Smartcore snap fit tile. I questioned the sales associate on what to use to cut and trim the "tiles" He told me any fine toothed power saw would work. Then I asked him how they fastened to the Advantech. He said they are not fastened to the floor. If that is true, I am somewhat mystified but you tell me lol
 
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Old 05-12-23, 04:18 PM
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Interesting.... I haven't seen that before. It locks together like wood flooring.
If no grouting how watertight is it ?
The reviews weren't very positive.
Smartcore installation - video
 
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Old 05-12-23, 06:45 PM
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Good question. I think I will get a quote from a tile installation company.
 
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Old 05-12-23, 09:27 PM
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It's like any other LVT floor. Waterproof to an extent. Floors aren't bathtubs so don't count on it tokens subfloor dry if you have a flood. It's waterproof from minor spills that get cleaned up fairly promptly.

There is a learning curve when it comes to installing them. The videos make it look easier than it is.
 
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Old 05-13-23, 08:52 AM
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Since my "thing" is small engines, my confidence level on tile, flooring, and sweating BIG copper pipes is just not that high. No substitute for experience lol Can two pieces of cement board be attached on top of each other to get a 3/4" thick piece? It doesn't look like I can get it here locally.
 
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Old 05-13-23, 02:43 PM
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Not sure what you're doing with cement board... subfloor should be plywood or osb.
 
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Old 05-13-23, 04:22 PM
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If you take a quick look at post #2 in this stream, the Pilot suggests cement board for anything that requires mortar or thinset to waterproof. (like tile) I am trying to get my working floor height back to what it is now (where the toilet leak didn't destroy the flooring underneath it. Right now I have a toilet pipe flange sticking up with nothing beneath it except one lateral 2x10 that the flange is nailed to. The leak destroyed the wood supporting the rock like material that the old original tile was glued to in a 2' square area around the flange. I have cut and built more 2X10s to support the toilet base in this area. I plan to put back in what was originally there (half inch thick plywood and then put waterproof cement board over that and over the rest of the floor in the room) This new cement board should support a complete set of new ceramic tiles sealed with grout etc.
 
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Old 05-13-23, 07:44 PM
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Well either you're confused or I am. I thought you said: "I called the local Lowes concerning the Smartcore snap fit tile."

The product you mentioned above (in post 5) is LVT... its not tile. LVT like Smartcore tile is a floating floor, its not glued down, it's not set in thinset, it's not ceramic tile. Therefore it gets laid on a smooth plywood subfloor, or over the top of a smooth existing floor of some other type.

Did you change your mind and now you are putting in ceramic tile?

And my point in questioning the cement board is that your subfloor needs to have the strength to resist deflection. Cement board does not do that. So for instance, 1/2" plywood with 2 layers of cement board is going to be weak and will be prone to sag or bend... especially around a toilet. You'd need minimum 3/4 plywood as the subfloor, before adding any fillers on top. And for ceramic floor tile you usually need minimum of 1 1/4". So my point is, no matter what floor you are putting down, don't use 2 layers of cement board over 1/2" because that 1/2" plywood is not strong enough and cement board has no strength as a subfloor... (i.e. no span rating).

If you are doing ceramic tile, put down 3/4 plywood, followed by 1/2" plywood, followed by 1/4" cement board if that is what you need to match your existing height.
 
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Old 05-13-23, 08:28 PM
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When he said "get a quote from the tile company" I think he's considering traditional tile now.
 
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Old 05-14-23, 08:33 AM
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10-4 on Pete's assessment, as after looking into fitting up a snap together floor which may have waterproofing issues, I think the smart thing to do here is have new tile installed. I agree with the X man about the strength issues with 1/2 inch plywood going down first. (That is what they used when it was built 60 years ago, and THEN they put down some kind of adhesive rock like material over that. (3/4" thick) The ceramic tile is bonded to the rock material and the broken tiles are bringing the rock up with the tiles. I have added 2X10's under the toilet area where there weren't any, and I probably need one more toward the front wall to support my new sub floor (s) If I put in 3/4" plywood first, The whole bathroom floor, rock base and tile (not to mention a vanity with faucets and a drain I use every morning) should be removed and replaced. All of this will have to line up with the door, and a toilet flange that was put in too high in the first place. (Confused? that would be me lol)
 
 

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