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Treadmill leveling and vibration reduction (suggestions?)

Treadmill leveling and vibration reduction (suggestions?)

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  #1  
Old 07-04-13, 06:38 AM
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Treadmill leveling and vibration reduction (suggestions?)

I picked up a used (barely) Bodyguard Treadmill T240 from a co-worker for pocket change. Wasn't really in the market for one, but the unit is reasonably higher end and was spotless (the belt was still shiny).

Anyway, I've been running on it for a week and a bit (and hurting, haven't ran in 15+yrs). One issue I'm having is I'm not very light footed (not near breaking 200lb, just kind of heavy footed running). The treadmill rocks or shakes a bit with my running (probably not great for it). This not only adds to the noise level, but vibrates my tablet I use for music (concert videos) along the book holder.
The floor is a slightly (~1%) sloped concrete in the unfinished basement.

I'm thinking of using a mat (similar to the wife's yoga mat) under the front rollers and a piece under the back legs.

Could anyone see an issue with this or have a better solution?
The front rollers must be able to roll as I do use the elevation a lot.


Side note: I'd probably use a dollar store sleeping mat as I would never hear the end of it if I used the wife's yoga mat.
 
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  #2  
Old 07-04-13, 06:47 AM
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I doubt a mat will make a lot of difference...I'm sure it would rapidly compress in the contact areas and then you are back to square one. Cheap to try it though. Might be problematic when you use the incline.

Even though that's not a $300 WalMart special, it's still a home use unit, though heavier duty than most.

I'd check and tighten everything if you haven't already, lube the belt/running surface (lube kits available online for cheap), and put your tablet on a wall mount or music stand kinda thing.
 
  #3  
Old 07-04-13, 06:54 AM
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I figured it would be worth a shot.
Even if it does compress, it can't (shouldn't) totally disappear, so there should be a hint of dampening. Maybe by then, I'll be a little less heavy footed too. The wheels are metal, so there is no give between them and the concrete floor.
For the tablet, I'm going to put a strip of foam tape (~2mm thick stuff). That should keep the tablet from sliding.
I did note that it slides to the left. This is the general direction I figure the floor is sloped. Rotating the unit isn't much of an option. The basement is very low (unfinished) ceiling. On incline, I'm actually head between the joists a bit. Can still run at 15% without issues, just if I turn it, I will only have a ~2ftx2ft area to keep my head.
 
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Old 07-04-13, 07:10 AM
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I will double check all the nuts and bolts in the chassi tonight when I get home.
I know the stand with the computer and railings is tight as I had to reassemble this when I got it home (wouldn't fit in the van assembled). My 4yrs old double checked my work when I was done.
 
  #5  
Old 07-04-13, 11:03 AM
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You can try a layered approach. Most machines only have four contact points with the ground which will compress most foams. What if you put down a soft mat and then a piece of plywood or steel plate for the feet. This would spread out the weight so the foam doesn't compress down to nothing but still allow the foam to absorb some shock & hopefully noise. If you want to get really fancy you can layer foams & rubber of different hardnesses.
 
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Old 07-04-13, 11:07 AM
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I was thinking some sort of hard rubber as well. Like the sole of a sneaker? I have no clue where you could get it.
 
  #7  
Old 07-04-13, 11:25 AM
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Thanks guys.
I'll see what I can come up with using these ideas. Will make sure not to use too thick of a material(s) or too soft. Don't want to allow the unit to actually move back and forth when I run, just absorb a bit of the shock.
 
  #8  
Old 07-13-13, 02:09 AM
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Not sure if you thought of this Mike but how about car floor mats or those mats you put down to protect a carpet from an office chair. Anyway I saw this and thought I would give the suggestion.
 
  #9  
Old 07-14-13, 09:35 AM
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Not sure if you thought of this Mike but how about car floor mats or those mats you put down to protect a carpet from an office chair. Anyway I saw this and thought I would give the suggestion.
Interestingly enough, this is what I did, which did help. Probably should have updated the thread with this info.
I picked up 2 floor mats from the dollar store (cost me $2 each, apparently not much is a dollar anymore).
Placed one under the front rollers so when fully raised, it would still be on the mat, and the other under the back legs.
This reduced a lot of the vibration. The remander probably could be reduced with myself learning to run not so heavy footed.

That being said, I won't be on it again for a couple months. I tore something bad on the inside of my one knee this weekend at the dragon boat races. Sounds odd to injure a knee in a boat race, but I did. To make matters worse, lost that race by 0.2 of a second. Got second place.
 
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