Termite control


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Old 07-05-12, 07:07 AM
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Termite control

I own a commercial building with concrete walls and raised slab. Just found termites going up walls and creating mud runs.. They are also outside under rotten wood laying along building. I have just installed the advanced compressed termite baits outside and will wait a few weeks to put the bait in once I see some activity. Inside I have also sprayed areas around the cracks in the floor where they were coming up and along sills where they are eating wood with Bifenthrin. Is there anything else I could use to help. I also have Dominion 2l to use if needed... Thanks
 
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Old 07-07-12, 07:02 AM
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Some ideas/thoughts:

Biifenthrin is labeled for termites, but it is a repellent as well as toxic to them. Bifenthrin is very good for general insect control, and we use a lot of it for that. The termite industry has moved to non-repellents for soil treatment. Examples of non-repellent active ingredients are: fipronil, and imidacloprid (such as Dominion). The idea is to let the termites into the treated zones, they sense nothing and many more termites are exposed that way. Since subterranean termites go back to the nest periodically, they introduce the toxicant to the colony through a transfer effect.

Donít use bifenthrin or any repellent anywhere near the bait stations as you will be working against your baiting strategy.

The bifenthrin will wear off soon indoors where you sprayed unless you applied a large volume. I wouldnít retreat with a non-repellent at this point until you see evidence of mud tubes again.

If/when new mud tunnels appear, donít destroy them but treat them with a surface spray, just enough to wet them. Also treat the gap where tunnel originates. Let it run in as long as the gaps take it. Be aware of location of water wells on property, or even within the structure, as we sometimes have here in the northeast.

The rotten wood outside: Maybe you moved it already, but if not then donít and consider doing this. Spray the wood, soak it, with a non-repellent and let the little fellas eat it. Also, bait stations would be good there. Liquid soil treatment needs to get below the surface for more effectiveness. Consider a 10 to 25 gallon sprayer, make a trench in soil perimeter, and flood it. If soil is to compact to absorb, use re-bar and pound holes down and flood.

Keep us posted with any additional info.
 
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Old 07-10-12, 11:52 AM
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Thanks for the info... I installed the termite bait units with the wood in them last week out side. I will be getting the actual baits(diflubenzuron) soon. I know we have termites outside. Should I actually wait until they hit the wood in the units or just put baits in 3 of them...
So with regard to the imidcloriprid..should I soak the area as well as the baits too then...or just let the baits do their job?
 
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Old 07-11-12, 02:03 PM
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I have little hands-on experience with termite baiting; we are fipronil/imidacloprid users in the tradtional soil treatment manner. I donít think it would hurt to treat near the stations with a non-repellent. Sometimes the termites never hit the wooden stakes. I favor liquid soil treatments as it is pro-active, as opposed to waiting for termites to do what I want them to do, as in a passive baiting strategy. Non-repellent termiticides and baiting programs can and do work together.
 
 

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