Carpenter bees


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Old 06-29-13, 06:52 PM
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Carpenter bees

Anyone know how to get rid of carpenter bees
 
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Old 06-30-13, 04:04 AM
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I have successfully, and first hand, had the opportunity to use one of the new (or not so new) carpenter bee traps. You can find them on the internet, or observe the pictures and build your own. Super simple and they work. Now, you can't put the traps out in the yard and expect them to come to it, so placing them in the area where you observe the bees is imperative. You can go to ebay and put carpenter bee trap in the search engine for a gaggle of them. You must use pine lumber and no pressure treated, as the bees know the difference.
 
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Old 06-30-13, 04:17 AM
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I hadn't heard of the traps What I've been doing is using a duster to spray sevin dust into the holes they bore. This kills any bees in the hole and their offspring. The bees tend to return to their place of birth to lay their egggs. Started doing this 4-5 yrs ago and and last year I only saw 1-2 carpenter bees but there seems to be more this year

I had always heard they wouldn't bore painted/stained or PT wood but have seen otherwise, I think maybe it slows them down but it certainly doesn't stop them
 
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Old 06-30-13, 05:14 AM
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I had the success with my homemade traps, and visited a client who has a "sometimes" home on the lake (from Florida), and he had two hanging from his eaves right next to the bee holes. The bees were laughing at his traps. I took one down and noted it was southern pine pressure treated. I think they like a SPF better, since it is softer, and less the PT.
 
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Old 06-30-13, 05:58 AM
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Pretreating the wood with Timbor or Bora Care will also help.
It kills them by dehydrating them, not poisoning them.
I'm surprised no ones suggest just plugging the hole. Not going to work. That's going to leave the larvae alive in the hole and it's going to just bore another hole to get out, and does nothing to protect the rest of the wood.
 
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Old 06-30-13, 06:08 AM
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I've heard that you are supposed to plug the hole after you dust but I've had decent success without plugging them ..... especially on my barn - too many holes

Sevin dust isn't the recommended insecticide but it's a whole lot cheaper and seems to be effective as the more expensive powder tailored made for carpenter bees - I don't remember the recommended powder's name
 
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Old 06-30-13, 07:55 AM
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Thank you all for all your help
 
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Old 06-30-13, 10:19 AM
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Any insecticide dust will work well in carpenter bee holes. I use Tempo D, but Sevin is cheap and available. You can also mix sevin with water and spray on wood although it will leave a white film, if that matters on that site.
 
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Old 07-20-13, 01:08 PM
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Saw them for the first time ever in March. We moved into this property in December. I was seeing these big, fat, clumsy bumble bees that kept charging me and I had no clue what I was looking at until I started seeing holes and did the research.

Initially I had an exterminator out and he sprayed all my exterior wood structures with a deltamethryn-based liquid, one of their popular tools nowadays. It worked well as a repellent but because it soaked into the wood the bees can't pick enough of it up to kill them. I was still sitting there watching them explore every inch of my deck looking for a spot the exterminator missed.

Eventually I picked up two 11 dollar traps from Amazon and a canister of 7 dust from Home Depot. I put the traps up and started blowing the dust into the tunnels as far as i could with a handheld puffer every couple weeks. I saw the activity drop to almost zero within a few weeks and started finding bees in the traps or lying dead on the ground.

In my opinion getting Seven or some other dust into the holes is Key, and I wouldn't bother with any exterminator who doesn't do this. It sits on top of the wood rather than soaking into it, so they pick it up and carry it in to the larvae, and it wont get washed out of there by the rain. The bees you see charging at you in April and May are dead within weeks. They mate, drill, lay a bunch of eggs in those tunnels, and then die. The baby bees hatch and come out to feed briefly in late summer or early fall then go back into tunnels to hibernate until next March. This is why I wouldn't plug any holes until fall even though alot of experts say you can do it a few days or a week after you treat them. You want the babies to come out and touch the poison and die. Otherwise if you seal in any living larvae that were unaffected by the treatment, when they hatch they will tunnel through your patches or make new holes next to them.

Do all 3 this year, repellent spray, dusted tunnels, and traps, and then call an exterminator as soon as things thaw out next year. Get a repellent spray on all exterior wood and be ready to dust any new holes you find. I would be surprised if it is a big issue again the 3rd or 4th summer.

For prevention, never store lumber or branches anywhere near the house. If you have had one infestation somewhere specific it is more likely they will be attracted to it again in the future. Paint or Stain all exterior wood structures. (They hate paint and stain but for some reason can stomach sealant.) If you cannot paint or stain something it should get a thorough preventative spray at least once per year by mid or late march. If the exterminator uses the good stuff it remains potent for 60-90 days outdoors regardless of weather, which covers the average life-cycle of a generation of these things.
 

Last edited by eharri3; 07-20-13 at 04:08 PM.
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Old 07-20-13, 03:24 PM
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Dusting the holes is a key element. There is an aerosol that may be more user friendly than powder in some situations is ďTri-DieĒ.

Also on some structures Iíve noticed that only certain wooden elements are attacked. I urge people to see if thatís the case at their house and treat (or donít treat) accordingly.

Good advice eharri3
 
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Old 07-21-13, 06:21 AM
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To give an idea, I first started seeing them in late March/ Early April. Between the first generation naturally dying off naturally and being killed by the treatment, things died down in early to mid June. Now over a Month later I am just starting to find dying bees again. These are the newly matured ones who crawled out of the tunnels past my poison to get out. If I had sealed the tunnels back in June right after I treated them and missed some of these bad boys I might have more holes.
 
 

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