Termite Treatment Versus Wholesale Pollution

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Old 09-15-19, 05:10 AM
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Termite Treatment Versus Wholesale Pollution

(summarized) Dig trench around perimeter of house. Pour termiticide solution into trench. So as termites commute from home (the nest) to work (the wood frame of the house) they pass through the termiticide and die.

"Glycol" is a powerful termiticide. It is a component of common automotive antifreeze. So I did just that, poured (inexpensive) antifreeze into the trench.

Meanwhile people are cautioned not to dump antifreeze indiscriminately as it is a pollutant.

(You finish the story, if you please.)

(Another pair of dueling proverbs, OT here)

1. Pour a little antifreeze into drains and toilets to prevent freezing damage.
2. Don't pour antifreeze down the drain; it is a pollutant.
In an earlier lifetime I did #1 along with draining the pipes when going on vacation in winter which was often, after once having a heating system fail and pipes freeze.
 
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09-15-19, 06:50 AM
PAbugman
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"Glycol" is not a termiticide.
Antifreeze of any sort, and there are various levels of toxicity depending on its purpose, is also not a termiticide and anyone using it as such is violating the label and the "Federal labeling" act as well as "FIFRA" and state pesticide regs as well. Using antifreeze as a termiticide may be construed as a haz mat event depending upon how aggressive the state wants to be and should be disclosed in future real estate transactions.

The safest way to treat for termites is to follow "good manufacturing practices" as established by the pest control trade associations and by following the labels for termiticide treatments as they are determined by chemists, entomologists, chemical engineers, etc and eventually given approval by EPA and the respective state agencies. The USDA field tests for termites/termiticides in Mississippi provide much data too.
 

Last edited by PAbugman; 09-15-19 at 09:37 AM. Reason: correction
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Old 09-15-19, 05:19 AM
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In plumbing fixtures, you use RV antifreeze which is less toxic.

The biggest thing is you don't want to have the antifreeze exposed where animals and children can ingest it as it is toxic.
 
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Old 09-15-19, 06:50 AM
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"Glycol" is not a termiticide.
Antifreeze of any sort, and there are various levels of toxicity depending on its purpose, is also not a termiticide and anyone using it as such is violating the label and the "Federal labeling" act as well as "FIFRA" and state pesticide regs as well. Using antifreeze as a termiticide may be construed as a haz mat event depending upon how aggressive the state wants to be and should be disclosed in future real estate transactions.

The safest way to treat for termites is to follow "good manufacturing practices" as established by the pest control trade associations and by following the labels for termiticide treatments as they are determined by chemists, entomologists, chemical engineers, etc and eventually given approval by EPA and the respective state agencies. The USDA field tests for termites/termiticides in Mississippi provide much data too.
 
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Last edited by PAbugman; 09-15-19 at 09:37 AM. Reason: correction
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Old 09-15-19, 10:02 AM
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You said you poured termiticide in the trench. Then in the next paragraph you said you poured antifreeze in the trench. Which is it? Did you do both?

I believe termiticides work because the termites don't detect it. They come in contact with the poison and carry it back to the nest which eventually kills the colony. If you treat the area with something they can detect they avoid the poison and can find another path into your home.
 
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Old 09-15-19, 10:35 AM
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I put antifreeze in the trench (to act as the termiticide).
 
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Old 09-15-19, 01:28 PM
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I hope the trench is covered so no animals can get to it.
 
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Old 09-16-19, 06:57 AM
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A typical house here in the northeast, with basement and/or crawl space, not a slab, usually requires between 100 & 150, sometimes 200 gallons of termiticide applied in a trench but also vertically using a soil rod to get the termiticide up and down along the foundation walls. Drilling spaced holes in concrete sidewalk, patio, etc along the house is also required to "rod through" the holes. Simply pouring it into a trench can't be counted on to get the termiticide deep enough, though sometimes it does work especially if the soil is porous.

I can't imagine that you used that much anti-freeze or anything close to that. In any case, termiticide is cheaper than anti-freeze so it makes no sense.

Please make sure the trench and anti-freeze is covered with clean, dry soil as the sweetness of anti-freeze will attract and poison animals. Even tiny amounts are quite toxic.
 
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