Termaticide injection equipment


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Old 10-18-21, 11:53 AM
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Termaticide injection equipment

Planning to do some termaticide injection and wondering what is the best gear for this work? Willing to pay for good stuff that works.

TexasFire
 
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Old 10-18-21, 12:49 PM
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I assume you are talking about boring through concrete slabs or into CMU blocks to inject insecticide. For a very small project you can use a pump style garden sprayer. I made my own portable 5 gallon rig with a pump. I used a bucket for the reservoir, a 12vdc pump like used in RV water systems, a 3s lipo battery for power, switch, flexible tubing and some rigid brass tubing. Everything was less than $100 so I don't mind that I won't reuse anything for other projects because of its chemical exposure.
 
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Old 10-18-21, 08:39 PM
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Iím wanting to inject in the dirt to avoid digging a trench. I assumed that was a suitable alternative from what Iíve read as long as you have the right equipment.
TexasFire
 
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Old 10-24-21, 07:02 AM
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What you want is called a "soil rod" for termite treatments. I'm pretty sure that the labels call for a trench, and we always did a trench and then "rod through" the trench. We used "grubbing hoes" or "mattocks" to make the trench. Be aware that this trench does not have to be deep or wide. It has to be able to contain any runoff as sometimes when "rodding" the termiticide will follow the path of the least resistance and come back up beside the rod into the trench. In that case you need to go deeper, or move the rod left or right, etc. As you insert the rod and push it deeper, you have to have flow already started otherwise the soil will clog up the application tips. Another reason to have a trench to contain the termiticide. Besides, it's always a good idea to "flood" the trench when done rodding to help make the continuous chemical barrier. The flooded trench will absorb into the soil and actually into the previously made rod holes It's a good idea.

Now, all that said, if you are in Texas, how deep to the footer of the structure. Do you have a basement/crawl space? If it's a slab and relatively porous soil, then a trench flooded with the proper amount of termiticide per linear foot, usually 4 gal per 10 linear feet per foot of depth to footer may be all you need.

These are examples of soil rods.

https://www.google.com/search?client...rmite+soil+rod
 
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Old 10-26-21, 01:57 PM
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Thanks for the info. Those rods in the link you provided look like theyíd do the job. What type of pump feeds these applicators?

TF
 
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Old 10-26-21, 01:58 PM
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I will be using Taurus SC and the application rate is 4 gallons of solution for 10 feet as you mentioned.

TF
 
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Old 10-27-21, 05:52 AM
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Good choice of termiticide for subterranean termites (and ants).

Termiticide shouldn't be applied/injected at high pressure as we want it to stay where we put it. Too high pressure and it can get into the trenches in place for water/sewage/electric lines and move off site. Be aware of water wells nearby just for this reason.

12 volt pumps can work if the soil is loose/porous enough. Slow and low pressure. Typically, a "diaphragm" pump.

110 volt motors/pumps are what I started with. They work well if you have a steady source of electricity at the job site(s), including a generator. Very low maintenance, reliable. Typically, a "roller" pump.

Gasoline engine/pumps are professional grade and are what I ended up using later in my career as I sold my customer list to a local company and went to work for them. Good for doing a lot of jobs in one day when you are driving from one to the other. Skid mounted unless you build your own. Skid mounted are expensive, into the thousands of dollars but if in the business, it's a good way to go.

For a DIY applicator, I'd go with the 110 volt pump as it is simple and powerful enough. You will need a pressure regulator on the pump discharge side which will give you low to high pressure better than the 12volt. More durable than 12 volt.

Tractor Supply type stores sell good 110 volt pumps, pressure regulators, at least they used to.
 
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Old 10-27-21, 10:03 PM
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Great info. Thanks!

TF
 
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Old 10-28-21, 05:26 AM
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Check out 12v marine/rv water pumps. They develop low/medium pressure and most have a built in pressure switch that turns them off if there is an obstruction and the pressure rises. Mine turns off at 80 psi. The pump I choose lists a 1 gallon per minute maximum flow rate but with the tubing I used it's about 1/2 gal/hr but it's easy to put a valve inline to control the flow rate.
 
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Old 10-28-21, 07:33 AM
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Pilot: Does that pump have a bypass/recirculator capability? If not, then the pump will shut off as soon as the operator stops the flow by releasing the handle on the soil rod as the operator has to do when lifting out of the soil, moving laterally, etc. The bypass/recirculator routes the chemical back to the tank when the operator stops the flow at the tool and routes it back to the tool when operator engages the handle again. The bypass device is also where the pressure is increased or decreased. There is a lot of "on/off" when treating so bypass back to the tank is necessary.

The pump will pump at a constant, consistent pressure all the time, whether soil rod is engaged or not. When bypass is adjusted for more pressure to the soil rod there will be less bypass to the tank. When bypass is adjusted for less pressure to the soil rod, there will be more bypass to the tank. Either way, if you could add the pressure at the soil rod to the pressure at the bypass, it will equal the pressure (or gpm) of the pump. It's just a question of where you are directing the flow.

Sidenote: the bypass flow to the tank also keeps the insecticide agitated and mixed.

 
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Old 10-28-21, 08:31 AM
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Pumps like that do not have a bypass. There is an internal pressure switch to turn the pump off when it hits about 80 psi. I attached a power switch to the base of my wand so it's convenient to quickly turn off. I have the pump & lithium battery mounted to a 6.5 gallon beer brewing bucket which is marked in 1 gallon increments. Then I measure out a 10ft length of trench and dispense the appropriate amount. It also works for injecting through holes in concrete slabs.

The pumps are designed to cycle on and off repeatedly during normal operation so turning it on and off doesn't seem to have harmed it. So far it has held up well but I don't do it commercially. It is just for my personal use. I have about $30 in the whole system. Even with the current prices the pump is only $21 on Amazon and it makes a very small & portable system for smaller jobs.
 
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